new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Actias+luna

Actias luna

Ordine: Lepidotteri

Queste farfalle che abitano le foreste del Nordamerica sono tra i più grandi Lepidotteri del mondo, le ali sono dotate di lunghi prolungamenti che la rendono simile ad un aquilone. La loro lunghezza sfiora i 15 cm, il loro nome deriva dalle caratteristiche macchiette sulle ali a forma di luna. Questa specie di Lepidotteri possiede un olfatto molto sviluppato; nella stagione degli amori le femmine emettono un odore che attira i maschi: grazie alle potenti antenne questi sono capaci di captarlo anche a 6 km di distanza. Dopo l'accoppiamento le femmine depongono grappoli di uova, dalle quali nasceranno bruchi dalle teste voluminose. Questi cresceranno fino a raggiungere i 7cm di lunghezza e muteranno colore col passare del tempo

****INFORMAZIONI RACCOLTE IN INTERNET***

 

I would be hard-pressed to think of a more lovely or magical-looking moth than this magnificent luna moth. You can tell this is a male luna moth by looking at those frilly antennae, which are noticeably larger in males when compared with females. I hope he found a mate and they went on a honeymoon last night!

Let's just say they're huge. This one was sunning on this silt fence near Little River, North Georgia

 

Have a good Saturday night everyone - hope you can get out soon!

Luna moths are not only one of the largest moths in North America - this one was as big as my hand - they are also one of the loveliest. June is the month when most of the giant silkworm moths emerge from their wintering cocoons here in northern Iowa. Luna moths have a very short life span, a day or two at most and they don't even have mouthparts for feeding. Wouldn't it be magical to see one of these luna moths flying on a full moon night!

The Luna Moth is a lime-green, Nearctic Saturniid moth in the family Saturniidae, subfamily Saturniinae. It has a wingspan of up to 114 mm (4.5 in), making it one of the largest moths in North America. This male is captive bred and emerged on 22 April 2015.

 

Thanks for your visit and any comment you make on my photographs – it is greatly appreciated and encouraging!

 

© Roger Wasley 2015 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

This spectacular moth is found in North America from east of the Great Plains in the United States to northern Mexico and from Saskatchewan eastward through central Quebec to Nova Scotia in Canada. There have been sightings as far south as central Florida.

 

Ex-pupa, emerged 08.08.2014. Captive bred.

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

This is the same big Luna I posted yesterday on my walking stick. These wings are probably 6 inches open like that. May appears to be the month for these magical tailed moths. North Georgia

 

Happy Moth Monday!

 

Tourbière du Parc Coeur Nature, Saint-Narcisse, Québec – Canada

I was hiking the other day in Red River Gorge and I consumed part of my luck for the rest of the year because I saw a Luna Moth. They are not considered endangered as yet, however they are rare in some areas.

The adult lives only a week, which further reduces the chance of meeting one.

It was healthy and happy flying from tree to tree, I slowly approached it and, surprisinghly, it paused giving me the chance to take a few shots. The few moments made me forget that I was drained, close to the end of a hike which felt most like swiming uphil in 100 degF water.

~~~

Luna Moth (Actias luna):

-Nearctic moth in the family Saturniidae, also known as giant silk moths

-Typical Wingspan 114 mm (4.5 in), can exceed 178 mm (7 in), one of the largest in North America

-One generation per year in Canada, two-three generation per year further south in US

-Elongated tail role is to scramble the echolocation detection used by bats, kind of like flares for military aircrafts :)

-Due to its beauty, the luna moth is not considered a pest, in fact, the use of pesticides, loss of habitat, and pollution are some of the reasons it is endangered. (the Spruce)

Luna moth is a Nearctic moth in the family Saturniidae, a group commonly known as giant silk moths. It has lime-green colored wings and a white body. Wingspan of roughly 114 mm (4.5 in), but can exceed 178 mm (7.0 in), making it one of the larger moths in North America.

Luna moth in Landsford Canal State Park, South Carolina. USA

Next to Catawba river.

This is the first time I've ever spotted one of these beautiful creatures in the wild, it having just happened to have alit on a tree in the yard shortly after emerging from metamorphosis and still unable to fly freely.

 

Adult moths of these species live only about a week and do not eat but rather subsist entirely off fat stored while in their caterpillar stage.

 

It can be identified as a male by its large antennae.

 

Shot on Pentax K-1 with SMC Pentax-FA 50mm f/2.8 macro.

This is the first time I've ever spotted one of these beautiful creatures in the wild, it having just happened to have alit on a tree in the yard shortly after emerging from metamorphosis and still unable to fly freely.

 

Adult moths of these species live only about a week and do not eat but rather subsist entirely off fat stored while in their caterpillar stage.

 

It can be identified as a male by its large antennae.

 

Shot on Pentax K-1 with SMC Pentax-FA 50mm f/2.8 macro.

The Luna moth (Actias luna) is a Nearctic moth in the family Saturniidae, subfamily Saturniinae, a group commonly known as giant silk moths.

Actias Luna Moth (and me).

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actias_luna

 

This lovely new Luna moth dried its wings on the outside corner of my garage window today. I took several photos but they all include the old window frame...not a spectacular nature pose that we would all hope for ;) So, I just kept part of the frame and part of me in the photo. Why not? Breaking all the composition rules, again...

 

I always liked this melancholy song about love at first sight:

...yes, she caught my eye, as I walked on by...and I don't think that I'll ever see her again. But we shared a moment that will last till the end. Your beautiful, your beautiful...it's true.

 

Jame Blunt: Your Beautiful

www.youtube.com/watch?v=nX1VeFBo9AQ

(Actias luna). Anderson County, Texas.

 

I still have plenty of West Texas photos to post, but I'm taking a short break to post a few recent images from my part of the state.

 

Caro spotted this beautiful male Luna Moth, our first of the season, on an outing to a spectacular rich forest near the western edge of the Pineywoods. It was the icing on the cake to an incredible day in the woods.

Luna Moth (Actias luna)

 

After reading about them I feel fortunate that my husband spotted this one on a tree out front. They only live up to one week....so sad for such a beautiful creature. It's common in eastern North America but seldom seen due to its short lifespan. It was enormous in size...extending out beyond my outstretched hand. When they emerge from the cocoon their wings are very small and it takes 2 hrs for them to enlarge as the moth pumps bodily fluids through them. Perhaps that's what this one was doing as it never moved while we watched it for a long time!

 

Member of Nature’s Spirit

Good Stewards of Nature

Ex-pupa, emerged 09.08.2014. Captive bred.

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

Female Luna Moth Photographed with my Canon 100mm macro lens alive and healthy on Black Velvet, May 27th

It was a treat to find both a Luna moth and a Luna cat within minutes of each other!

Chaney and I couldn't believe our luck today, as we found THREE Luna Moths! One was at a gas station, and two were on the trails at Splinter Hill Bog...it's rare for us to come across them in the woods, so to commemorate this remarkable day, I'm posting two of them...

This is the first time I've ever spotted one of these beautiful creatures in the wild, it having just happened to have alit on a tree in the yard shortly after emerging from metamorphosis and still unable to fly freely.

 

Adult moths of these species live only about a week and do not eat but rather subsist entirely off fat stored while in their caterpillar stage.

 

It can be identified as a male by its large antennae.

 

Shot on Pentax K-1 with SMC Pentax-FA 50mm f/2.8 macro.

Luna Moth (Actias luna)

The "Luna moth"

La mariposa nocturna "Luna"

7758 Actias Luna- Luna Moth

 

Suffolk County, NY

With an adult form lasting just one week, I count myself very lucky to have seen two Luna moths on separate trips to Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Both took my breath away with regard size and beauty.

 

As with all Saturniidae moths, adults lack mouth parts and spend their short time busy with the mating process.

 

Wingspan 12 cm

 

The luna moth (Actias luna) is a lime-green, Nearctic Saturniid moth in the family Saturniidae, subfamily Saturniinae. It has a wingspan of up to 114 mm (4.5 in), making it one of the largest moths in North America. ( Wikipedia ) ( Found on my patio )

******************************************************************************

Le papillon lune (Actias luna) est un lépidoptère nocturne appartenant à la famille des Saturniidae. Il est caractérisé par une coloration verte pâle et à la présence d'ocelles sur les ailes antérieures et postérieures. Cette espèce se retrouve dans les milieux boisés et semble préférer les forêts bien drainées. Les adultes sont attirées par la lumière. Par son apparence exotique et unique, il est particulièrement populaire. ( Wikipédia ) ( Retrouvé sur mon patio )

While driving down the dirt road into the Upper Delta, Chaney braked abruptly and shouted 'LUNA!!!' I assumed she'd spotted a caterpillar until I glanced out the window and saw the moth! A nice find to start the day, and I then found a Luna caterpillar as our hike began!

Actias Luna

 

Suffolk County, NY

It was a treat to find both a Luna moth and a Luna cat within minutes of each other!

We saw this beautiful Luna Moth in the butterfly house at London Zoo at a "Sunset Safari" event.

 

The Luna Moth is a light-green moth that has long, curving tails on its hindwings and distinctive eyespots on all four wings. It is nocturnal, and can be found in deciduous hardwood forests in North America, from Canada to Northern Mexico. The Luna moth has a wingspan of 7.5-10.8 cm. Males and females are similar in appearance, but the antennae of the males appear more feathery.

 

The Luna moth starts life as a tiny egg that hatches into a plump lime-green caterpillar with tiny orange spots along the sides. This slow-moving caterpillar eats the leaves of the white birch, alder, persimmon, sweet gum, hickory, walnut, or sumac trees. After eating and growing, the caterpillar builds a brown, tent-like cocoon, and eventually emerges as a fully-grown adult. The adult Luna moth does not eat; it only mates and reproduces.

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 52 53