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As always, these flighty, beautiful birds are an excellent challenge for the bird photographer.

Here's an old one I found while looking for something else. An Australian Raven messing with us at lunch. I haven't seen one come so close before, anywhere.

 

Missnoma is right, it looks wise perhaps more than grumpy, so I changed the title.

 

[Previous title: DON'T ... mess with me, you ... insect!]

On Saturday evening I went along with the family to a special members event at the Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG). The rainforest gully walk has been kitted out with low wattage LED lighting funded by the 'Friends of the Botanic Gardens' and Saturday night was the first time they were showing it off.

 

I had brought my tripod and camera with me … I decided on a single lens for the night: my Nikkor 20mm f/2.8D … a little jewel of a lens. I wanted something quite fast and wide and my tripod enabled the longer exposures you see here.

 

Lushpup Images | Lushpup Blog

An over the shoulder look and some detail in his back feathers ..

 

...taken during the wander at the gardens with Stephen on Wednesday ..

Blechnum patersonii, ANBG rainforest gully, Canberra

The bottlebrush is one of the most popular bushes in Australia and as well as being grown in gardens it is planted along nature strips throughout many of our cities and townships. Gorgeous!! One reason it is so popular is that it attracts our native birds. The bottlebrush comes in a variety of reds, pinks and yellow/cream shades

 

The flower spikes of bottlebrushes form in spring and summer and are made up of a number of individual flowers. The pollen of the flower forms on the tip of a long coloured stalk called a filament. It is these filaments which give the flower spike its colour and distinctive 'bottlebrush' shape. The filaments are usually yellow or red, sometimes the pollen also adds a bright yellow flush to the flower spikes.

 

Each flower produces a small woody fruit containing hundreds of tiny seeds. These fruits form in clusters along the stem, and are usually held on the plant for many years. The seeds are usually not released from the fruits for several years, but in some species the fruits open after about a year. Fire also stimulates the opening of the fruits in some bottlebrushes.

 

The new leaves of many bottlebrushes are very ornamental. The leaves are often coloured and, in some species, they are covered with fine, soft hairs.

 

www.anbg.gov.au/callistemon/index.html

 

Do view large.

I have the misting fog irrigation system at the Australian National Botanic Gardens to thank for this one ... I was in the rainforest gully section when the mist jets came on further up the gully and rolled its fog toward me ... the way it played with the late afternoon sunlight made me gasp. No textures added here ... though it is a 3-frame HDR to try and capture the stairs which were in almost complete darkness. The scene reminded me of a dream I had ... still does.

 

This'll likely be my last image post for a couple of days as I'm taking apart my main workstation later tonight in preparation for a new motherboard and processor I'll install tomorrow ... then a total reinstall of the OS and hopefully ready for work later tomorrow ... though in my experience they always seem to take a lot longer than they should ... anyways, the laptop will still be up and I'll be able to comment and otherwise distract myself ... most likely you'll not notice any difference at all... :-)

 

Do You Dream In Colour?

Taken into the afternoon sun - always luv this effect!!

The native flannel flowers are so delicate and soft!

My mum used to luv them as they reminded her of the Edelweiss of her homeland.

The current seasons crop in the bush around the house are rather small this season so far.

www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2002/actinotus-helianthi.html

 

A Have a great day!! ;))

Dryandra sp.

The Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) are located in Canberra and are administered by the Australian Government's Department of the Environment and Heritage..

The botanic gardens are the largest living collection of native Australian flora, the mission of the ANBG is to study and promote Australia's flora. The gardens maintains a wide variety of botanical resources for researchers and cultivates native plants threatened in the wild..

History of the Gardens.

When Canberra was being planned in the 1930s, the establishment of the gardens was recommended in a report in 1933 by the Advisory Council of Federal Capital Territory. In 1935, The Dickson Report set forth a framework for their development. A large site for the gardens was set aside on Black Mountain. In September 1949, the Ceremonial planting of first trees by Prime Minister Ben Chifley and Director of Kew Gardens, Sir Edward Salisbury took place. Development of the site, facilities and collection progressed and the Gardens were officially opened in October 1970 by Prime Minister John Gorton..

The Gardens has tenure over 90 hectares on Black Mountain. About 40 hectares are currently developed as the Botanic Gardens. Plans for the development of the remaining land are on hold until funds are available.

at the Australian National Botanic Gardens

Happy New Year to one and all, from the land of green and gold - where the sun never sets, and there's a grape on every tree ...

 

The flower seen in this image is the Australian Kangaroo Paw.

See:

www.anbg.gov.au/anigozanthos/

  

I stumbled across this beautiful discarded Waratah on the shore this evening and decided to find a place for it in my shot.

The Waratah is a native australian plant particularly to the southeastern region of Australia (New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania) and is the floral emblem of New South Wales.

Some more info: www.anbg.gov.au/emblems/nsw.emblem.html

(A 'long' 30 sec exposure shot for the weekly theme)

 

Australian National Botanic Garden, Canberra, Australia.

Fungus fly (Tapeigaster sp.) on coral fungus (Ramaria sp.) ANBG eucalypt lawn, Canberra

Australian National Botanic Gardens - Gippsland Water Dragon or Australian Water Dragon

 

The Australian Water Dragon (Physignathus lesueurii), which includes the Eastern Water Dragon (P. l. lesueurii) and the Gippsland Water Dragon (P. l. howittii) subspecies, is an arboreal agamid species native to Eastern Australia from Victoria north to Queensland. Australian water dragons are extremely shy in the wild, but readily adapt to continual human presence in suburban parks and gardens. They are fast runners and strong climbers. When presented with a potential predator, they seek cover in thick vegetation, or drop from an overhanging branch into water. They are able to swim totally submerged, and rest on the bottom of shallow creeks or lakes for up to 90 minutes to avoid detection.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gippsland_Water_Dragon

 

The Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) are located in Canberra and are administered by the Australian Government's Department of the Environment and Heritage.

 

The botanic gardens are the largest living collection of native Australian flora, the mission of the ANBG is to study and promote Australia's flora. The gardens maintains a wide variety of botanical resources for researchers and cultivates native plants threatened in the wild.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_National_Botanic_Gardens

 

www.anbg.gov.au/gardens/index.html

© All Rights Reserved - No Usage Allowed in Any Form Without the Written Consent of Connie Lemperle/ lemperleconnie

 

Link to Cincinnati Zoo..............kookaburra

 

www.cincinnatizoo.org/

 

Also a new group to join for anyone who has Ohio Zoo pictures!

www.flickr.com/groups/ohio_zoos/

 

Also check out Zoos Around the World group!

www.flickr.com/groups/zoos_around_the_world/

 

Just posting some random shots of people and kids enjoying the Cincinnait Zoo! This shot was taken during the zoo's bird show. My camera broke toward the end of the show. I was maybe clicking too fast trying to get some in flight shots.

 

My camera looks like it's broken and would be too expensive to fix. I'm not sure how I'm going to replace it at the moment. I need to win the lottery!

Hope everyone has a great week!

 

Please no invites!

 

An Australian bird. They can be trained easily. The wild kookaburras will come and eat out of your hand once they trust you

  

www.anbg.gov.au/birds/birds.html

Yellow Robins are charmingly confiding, this one was in deep cover at the botanical gardens where I went hunting the other day for rufous fantails.

 

Found some fossicking around in a mixed feeding flock that included all of the usual suspects as well as the RFs:

- Rufous Fantail x3

- Grey Fantail x4

- E Yellow Robin x1

- Scarlet Robin x1

- Brown Thornbill x2

- White-browed Scrubwren x2

- Superb Fairywrens x4

- White-browed Treecreeper x1

 

Species being what they are, I ended up with no good photos of the Rufous Fantails because they were skittish, busy and hid a lot, but a couple of nice photos of Yellow Robin who kindly posed for a comparatively long time.

 

This robin dedicated to Carla!

Some staggeringly beautiful eucalyptus flowers at anbg. Pierre will laugh to know that I forgot to take a note of the ID, but will get it next time. I might try to take a photo looking straight at this flower too, but this is difficult as they hang just above ground level. This is a full size crop.

The sun made a brief appearance this afternoon and we took the opportunity to go for a walk. This is one of the flowering wattles we noticed.

 

© All Rights Reserved. This image may not be copied, reproduced, published or distributed in any medium without the expressed written permission of the copyright holder.

(Explored) Today I went to a beautiful location in Yaegl Country - Brooms Head - up here on the North Coast. I was here yesterday and it was raining.

I read that Pigface - the plant in the foreground - has the botanical name Carpobrotus glaucescens - see the the full story here: www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2005/carpobrotus-glaucescens.....

and extract is here :

"Derivation of the name:

 

Carpobrotus - comes from the Greek ‘karpos' (fruit) and ‘brota' (edible thing) and refers to the edible fruits."

 

That's why I called it "Edible Thing" rather than Pigface.

 

This is also the first time that I used the "Big Stopper" - a 10 stop filter by Lee,

11mm

f/9

3s

ISO 200

RAW adjustments in ACR

 

Have a good weekend everyone.

 

These little Silvereyes were looking irresistable as they tucked into the berries. So irresistible that I forgot to look at what the bush was, however thanks to Tattters and Ozymiles for identifying it as a Callicarpa pedunculata - 'Velvet Leaf'.

 

After lunch at the gardens I spent more than an hour mit Kamera wandering in beautiful autumn weather amongst the birds and bushes.

 

The gardens are a great hang-out for regular and itinerant birds. Some of the more famous residents are the family of White-winged Choughs that infest the outoor part of the cafe restaurant. Normally they threaten by flying onto or near your table, or swooping 10cm above your head, or lining up on a branch only a metre or two away to look disturbingly Hitchcockian. They will regularly take food from your plate if you leave the table, or even if you look away for too long. But today I had an Anzac biscuit still in my hand on the way to my mouth, when a Chough flew across the table at warp speed right between the two of us, elevation 1 foot, and grabbed the thing out of my hand. According to staff this is a new phase of the war; new measures are required. The Americans are suggesting twenty thousand more troops, I'm not sure.

Red and Green Kangaroo Paw, Anigozanthos manglesii was proclaimed the floral emblem of Western Australia on 9 November 1960.

 

another unique flower to this region.

 

for more details check this site out...

www.anbg.gov.au/emblems/wa.emblem.html

~1cm in length. It was soft and it was moving a bit.

Best viewed @ large size

 

Scrophulariaceae - Southeastern Australia

Derwentia

Shown: Detail of flowers

 

For detailed description and distribution map, visit:

www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2003/derwentia-perfoliata.html

 

Additional views:

farm4.static.flickr.com/3662/3596330029_ff1af0c067_b.jpg

farm3.static.flickr.com/2458/3596923693_b951c0024c_b.jpg

farm4.static.flickr.com/3604/3597791702_bd555735f2_b.jpg

farm4.static.flickr.com/3610/3597816286_93d589011c_b.jpg

 

Photographed in San Francisco Botanical Garden - San Francisco, California

A wattle-less Red Wattlebird feeds on this banksia ericifolia..

National Botanic Gardens water monitor by the main pool, I'm about 15cm away from the lizard

The Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) are located in Canberra and are administered by the Australian Government's Department of the Environment and Heritage..

The botanic gardens are the largest living collection of native Australian flora, the mission of the ANBG is to study and promote Australia's flora. The gardens maintains a wide variety of botanical resources for researchers and cultivates native plants threatened in the wild..

History of the Gardens.

When Canberra was being planned in the 1930s, the establishment of the gardens was recommended in a report in 1933 by the Advisory Council of Federal Capital Territory. In 1935, The Dickson Report set forth a framework for their development. A large site for the gardens was set aside on Black Mountain. In September 1949, the Ceremonial planting of first trees by Prime Minister Ben Chifley and Director of Kew Gardens, Sir Edward Salisbury took place. Development of the site, facilities and collection progressed and the Gardens were officially opened in October 1970 by Prime Minister John Gorton..

The Gardens has tenure over 90 hectares on Black Mountain. About 40 hectares are currently developed as the Botanic Gardens. Plans for the development of the remaining land are on hold until funds are available.

Swainsona galegifolia

 

On the billabong bush path, mid September.

 

Probably the time I got the tick stuck on my head, sitting amonst the long grass.

We don't go there till next Autumn, as the big browns take over for the summer.

 

From below, I can see more clusters of fire engine red popping up around the hillside, but I've got enough pics of these anyway for now.

 

Have found an orange version of these somewhere else.

 

www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml?pc=dig&pn=6957&size=3

 

Trimmed a tiny off.

Looks nice viewed in large.

 

Enjoy your weekend x

 

Look at my old wise look. This bird reminds me of merlin the happy wizard.

I cant get enough of this bird they are way cool on my list of birds. Shot taken ANBG's ACT

Lens baby meets bottle brush. . .

Likes what it sees. . .

a slight breeze, the music of the bees. . .romance is in the air!

 

www.anbg.gov.au/callistemon/

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