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I had put some crushed nuts down on the path for the birds, not expecting this little guy to come popping out within 5 minuets and start to run in and out stashing them 😊. Let’s hope he doesn’t think he’s a house mouse and decide to come into the house, 🏠 or I won’t be very happy 😆

 

Field Mice / Wood Mice:-

 

Also referred to as a wood mouse, the field mouse has a sandy brown coat and a white/grey underbelly. The field mouse has large back feet to help with the spring in their step and a long tail that matches the length of their bodies.

 

Field mice facts:

 

What’s the lifespan of a field mouse?

Due to wise predators and exposure to dangerous environments, a field mouse lifespan is usually around 1 year. In good conditions, however, the field mouse can live up to 3 years.

What do field mice eat?

Field mice eat seeds from trees, fruits, berries, nuts, fungi and will also tuck into a snail or two.

Do field mice hibernate?

Field mice do not hibernate; they stay active throughout the winter but will find a cosy spot indoors and journey outside for food – if food inside is in short supply.

Eating some seeds we put out for it in Cornwall

We were sat beside our pond this afternoon and this little Wood Mouse came out from amongst the wildflower patch and scurried across and disappeared into our log pile.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fave my images.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

  

Field Mice / Wood Mice:-

 

I had put some crushed nuts down on the path for the birds, not expecting this little guy to come popping out within 5 minuets and start to run in and out stashing them 😊. Let’s hope he doesn’t think he’s a house mouse and decide to come into the house, 🏠 or I won’t be very happy 😆

 

Also referred to as a wood mouse, the field mouse has a sandy brown coat and a white/grey underbelly. The field mouse has large back feet to help with the spring in their step and a long tail that matches the length of their bodies.

 

Field mice facts:

What’s the lifespan of a field mouse?

Due to wise predators and exposure to dangerous environments, a field mouse lifespan is usually around 1 year. In good conditions, however, the field mouse can live up to 3 years.

 

What do field mice eat?

Field mice eat seeds from trees, fruits, berries, nuts, fungi and will also tuck into a snail or two.

 

Do field mice hibernate?

Field mice do not hibernate; they stay active throughout the winter but will find a cosy spot indoors and journey outside for food – if food inside is in short supply.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

I layed on the floor and had to bring the focal length in as he got so close, this is a ground eye view of my first woodmouse

 

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

Ratolí de bosc_Ratolí de rostoll

 

_DSC6610_NKD500_VallbonaMSolero

The brown fluff above the brown dirt. CUTE!

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

Wood mouse a frequent visitor to the garden making the most of the birds messy feeding

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

Found a new Wood Mouse under my hide shed

Cheeky mouse looking for a snack in my greenhouse among the pots.

As we were sat on a log in a wooded area, this little Wood Mouse came scurrying past us and paused just long enough for me to get this shot. They have very long tails - longer than their bodies!

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fav my images.

Hiding from the meerkat. I can only imagine how fast its heart must had been beating...

 

Rapidité et astuce pour la survie. Après 10 minutes, je peux imaginer sa peur ...

Yuk Tony, I don't think much to your sandwiches! lol

As I was sat in the garden today I noticed this little Wood Mouse scurrying across the back of the raised bed with half an apple that I had put out for the birds - (I have a store of windfalls from my apple tree) - so I managed a few shots of it feeding on the apple.

 

Published in the Northern Echo 30-03-2020.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fave my images.

For macro mondays 'made of wood'

 

This tiny mouse was made by a local wood turner and usually lives on one of our bookshelves, but it was time for a photo shoot out in the woods today :)

Abandoned by parents in our garden, neighbour’s cat probably got them. I’m feeding him up ready for Winter !

Another image of the Wood Mouse that I photographed in our back garden eating one of my windfalls that I split in half for the birds.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fave my images.

Last of the mice photos

Gedeckter Tisch für das Waldmäuschen - Vogelfutter ist auch für Mäuse was Feines

Wood Mouse in the garden, stocking up for winter

Wood Mouse collecting/storing food from under the bird feeders this morning

Field Mice / Wood Mice:-

 

Also referred to as a wood mouse, the field mouse has a sandy brown coat and a white/grey underbelly. The field mouse has large back feet to help with the spring in their step and a long tail that matches the length of their bodies.

 

Field mice facts:

 

What’s the lifespan of a field mouse?

Due to wise predators and exposure to dangerous environments, a field mouse lifespan is usually around 1 year. In good conditions, however, the field mouse can live up to 3 years.

What do field mice eat?

Field mice eat seeds from trees, fruits, berries, nuts, fungi and will also tuck into a snail or two.

Do field mice hibernate?

Field mice do not hibernate; they stay active throughout the winter but will find a cosy spot indoors and journey outside for food – if food inside is in short supply.

Felt very lucky today. This is the first time I've ever seen a little wood mouse in the wild. I took LOTS of shots lol :-))

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