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yesterday in the garden, The Netherlnds

© Geoff Smithson. All Rights Reserved.

 

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The Peacock butterfly has reddish wings, each with a single, large peacock-feather-like eyespot – used to scare predators. It is one of the commonest garden butterflies, found throughout lowland England and Wales. It is rarer in Scotland. Several seen today, along with Comma, Small Tortoiseshell and male Brimstones.

The Peacock butterfly has brownish-red wings, each with a single, large peacock-feather-like eyespot – used to scare predators. It is one of the commonest garden butterflies, found throughout lowland England and Wales. It is rarer in Scotland. This worn example was seen in my garden on 15th October 2020.

Garden, Groningen, The Netherlands

Thank you all who fave and comment on my photo'/video's,much appreciated.And thank you all for looking.

I was surprised to find when I identified this butterfly that it was a peacock butterfly, Aglais io with its wings closed. The drab colouration of the underwings is such a contrast to the patterns on the upper wings shown in the first comment. It is resting on a common nettle, Urtica dioica.

 

The caterpillars of peacock butterflies feed on common nettles. The adult butterflies feed on the nectar of a variety of flowers.

 

Taken in a field managed for conservation at the smaller of the two Rytons in Shropshire, England.

 

Thanks for visiting. Thanks especially to those who have taken the time to leave a comment or fave.

In our garden

7th April 2020

A splash of colour to brighten the day!

Near Dunkeld this afternoon.

Out for a stroll in the Hertfordshire countryside, I happened upon a patch of creeping thistle (Cirsium arvense) bordering an open grassland. There were dozens of peacock butterflies (Aglais io) and other species feeding and willing to pose for the camera.

Even the “dark side” of the Peacock butterfly is beautiful if you get close enough

Peacock Butterfly searching for nectar at Kilnsea Wetlands. (686)

Bajos del Toro Amarillo - Costa Rica

dagpauwoog, garden, The Netherlands

One of the more common butterflies we see around here. For some reason, this variety seem to stay close to the ground, often seen just sitting in the grass

 

Hope your week is going well.

Aglais io

Paon-du-jour

Tagpfauenauge

La mariposa pavo real

Dagpåfugleøje

occhio di pavone

Páfiðrildi

Summertime. Garden, Groningen, The Netherlands

In Kilmacurragh 23 Jul 2018

 

Another one from Corton Suffolk.

A Peacock Butterfly showing off it's four "eyes". If startled, a resting Peacock will flash open it’s wings to reveal the eyespots to deter potential predators. Taken at Staveley.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fav my images.

Seen at a Local Nature Reserve near Hull,

The Peacock's spectacular pattern of eyespots evolved to startle or confuse predators, make it one of the most easily recognized and best-known species.

FREE ALL HEALTHY WILDLIFE THEY HAVE RIGHTS.

 

Taken handheld with manual focus, great fun running around trying to capture the perfect moment.

Taken at Hexham, Northumberland

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