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Gold in the Sierra Nevada Foothills

Placer County, California

 

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The skies are nearly black as summertime thunderstorms build in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in Northern California. You can see the silvery mist of rain showers here and there within the background.

 

I loved to take my golden retriever to this field near my home. He would really do his thing by pointing and flushing birds. I'm not a hunter and I didn't train him to do it. It was just in him. There was a pond nearby, and he would take off running to investigate the duck families that lived there. After a swim and one of those convulsive shakes that dogs do to dry-off, it was back into the fields for him. An hour later, I had a tired and smelly dog at home, but I wouldn’t have had it any other way. My pup passed away in 1999 at the age of 12 ½.

 

This photo was taken in 1991. The field shown in the photo is now covered wall-to-wall with tract homes. Only the memories remain of my dog and this magical place.

 

View the "before and after" photo collage here

Iowa Hill Road

California Gold Country

Placer County, California

 

The sign leading into this remote area in California's Gold Country warns, "Primitive Road". I don't know that it's primitive, but it is narrow (one lane) and if you happen to drive off, there are places where you can drop more than 500 feet into the American River below. Speaking of gold, there are still people digging, panning and dredging here, even today!

 

California's Gold Country is a vast area along the west side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. It is, of course, famous for the Gold Rush of 1849.

 

The famous "Cape Horn Promontory", a historic area of the original North American Transcontinental Railroad can be seen at the extreme upper edge of the photo, just left of center. That area of the rail line is some 1,300-1,400 feet above the valley floor.

1977 The first Apple Computer goes on sale. Quebec adopts French as the official language. Jimmy Carter is elected as the President of United States and the first oil flows through the Trans Alaskan Oil Pipeline. The precursor to the GPS system in use today is started by US Department of defense. Elvis Presley Dies from a heart attack aged 42.

 

British Public sector trade unions including Firefighters strike for wage increases over the 10% ceiling imposed by the British government. The first ever Quadraphonic concert in London by Pink Floyd. The first commercial flight Concord London to New York. NASA space shuttle makes its first test flight off the back of a jetliner. Voyager I and Voyager II are launched unmanned to explore the outer solar system.

 

When Britain's fire crews walked out on national strike, members of the public were advised to take matters into their own hands. Although the armed services, with their so-called "Green Goddess" fire engines, were drafted in, they were seen by many as a last line of defence.

 

As the strike took hold in the encroaching winter of November 1977, people were encouraged to keep buckets of sand and water at home. And at a time when many still relied on open fires for heating, householders were advised to have their chimneys cleaned. The London Fire Brigade issued its own 11-point safety guide, advising checking for smouldering cigarettes and leaving only essential electrical appliances like fridges plugged in. The strike began on 14 November and lasted for nine weeks, running through to the New Year. At the time fire fighters worked a basic 48-hour week, for which they were paid an average of £71.10, which amounted to £3,700 a year.

 

The fire fighters finally agreed to settle for a 10% pay rise with guarantees of future increases and they went back to work on 16 January.

 

Silver Jubilee of 1977

 

The Queen’s first biggie was the Silver Jubilee of 1977. The two previous monarchs had not reached this milestone; the Queen’s father King George VI died after only 15 years and two months on the throne and her uncle Edward VIII did not even make it to a year.

 

Britain in 1977 had recently experienced power cuts, a forerunner of the Winter of Discontent.

 

No wonder the country was in the mood for a party. But celebrations were different then. Children’s parties used to consist of jelly and ice-cream and Pass The Parcel; now they want a cabaret show and expensive goody bags. Similarly, the Diamond Jubilee involves a cast of thousands and many hours of airtime each day over the better part of a week. The Silver Jubilee coverage consisted of less than seven hours in total, mostly on Jubilee day itself, with not a single celebrity in sight – unless you count Margot (actress Penelope Keith) from The Good Life presenting Jubilee Jackanory.

 

The Royal Family was smaller 35 years ago so the Queen had to carry out all her own Jubilee engagements.

 

She went on a royal progress through Britain, much of it by car, so that she could be seen by as many people as possible, even if time did not allow for a walkabout in every town. Late in Jubilee year, a newspaper published a picture of her looking weary, with the comment “Well she IS 51.” And now here she is doing just as much at 86.

 

The tide was already turning in 1977 as that was the first year when foreign cars outsold British ones.

 

In Silver Jubilee year leisure for most people meant watching your newly-acquired (but in many cases rented) colour TV. There were only three channels – BBC1, BBC2 and ITV – but somehow there was always something worth watching. The Professionals was a favourite, starring Martin Shaw (sporting a bubble perm) and Lewis Collins and their Ford Capri, as was The New Avengers, a revival of the Sixties series, starring Joanna Lumley and her Purdey hairdo, a modern take on the pudding bowl. Roots, the ground-breaking mini-series tracing a black man’s family history from capture in West Africa, was broadcast in April 1977. Morecambe and Wise ruled the comedy roost. A staggering 28million – half the population at the time – watched their 1977 Christmas show, a figure unlikely to be exceeded.

 

Sadly the same might be said of Britain’s Wimbledon hopes. No one has really come close since Virginia Wade won in Silver Jubilee year in front of the Queen.

 

Before videos and DVDs, people still went to the cinema and in December 1977 everyone wanted to see Star Wars, a new kind of fantasy film about “a galaxy far, far away”, that spawned the genre that now includes The Lord Of The Rings and even Harry Potter. Meanwhile the pop world was fragmenting. On one side there was glam rock and disco; on the other, punk. The Sex Pistols’ snarling version of God Save The Queen was released in Jubilee week and their manager Malcolm McLaren said it was proof that there were “barbarians at the gate”.

 

They never made it through. The popularity of the Royal Family surged in Silver Jubilee year just as it had in Diamond Jubilee year.

 

We are not the same country we were in 1977. But perhaps we are not entirely different either.

 

Cost of Living

 

In 1977, 56 per cent of Britons owned one car or more, 74 per cent owned a washing machine. 50 per cent of people had central heating in their homes. Computers, DVD and CD players were non-existent. A couple with two children had an average net income of £363 a week. A single pensioner received an income of £180 a week. We spent 25 per cent of our income on food. We spent 10 per cent of our income on leisure and holidays. In 1977, 93 per cent of men aged 25-54 were in work. However female employment in the same age group was 59 per cent. 26 per cent of jobs were in manufacturing.

 

Despite the vast majority of adults thinking that things were better in the 1970s, figures from that era suggest that life was not easy.

 

1977: Star Wars fever hits Britain

 

Thousands of people were flocking to cinemas in the UK to watch the long-awaited blockbuster, Star Wars - a movie which is already setting US box offices alight. Bracing the cold weather, young and old queued from 0700 GMT in London at the Dominion, and Leicester Square cinemas, to snatch up non-reserved tickets which were otherwise booked until March.

 

Star Wars, which was first released in America seven months ago, has taken audiences by storm and outstripped last year's blockbuster Jaws to gross $156m (£108m) at the box office. Carrie Fisher, Sir Alec Guiness and little known Harrison Ford star in this fairytale set in space. Produced by Gary Kurtz, written and directed by George Lucas who directed American Graffitti, the U-classified sci-fi film is a classic epic of good versus evil. It has enthralled audiences under a dazzle of special effects with wizards, heroes, monsters in "a galaxy far, far away".

 

The 900 people involved in the film included giants, dwarfs, artists and the man who built machines for James Bond. Many of the optical special effects were developed in California by Industrial Light and Magic, a George Lucas company. The on-stage special effects were put together at Elstree studios in Britain. Filming took the cast to Tunisia, Death Valley California, Guatemala and the EMI soundstage at Elstree.

 

The build-up and hype has led to store wars over Star Wars with products including T-shirts, sweets, jig-saw puzzle, watches and food to name but a few. Mr Lucas has published a paperback version and Marvel comics have produced a special edition to meet the thirst for Star Wars' merchandise. But for those queuing today nothing will satisfy them but a chance to see the film itself - easy targets for touts trying to sell £2.20 tickets for £30.

 

1977 The Murders of the Yorkshire Ripper

 

5 February – 28-year-old homeless woman Irene Richardson is murdered in Leeds, at almost the exact location where prostitute Marcella Claxton was badly injured nine months ago. Police believe that this murder and attempted murder may be connected, along with the murders of Wilma McCann, Emily Jackson and the attempted murders of at least three other women.

 

Near the body, the police discovered an important clue. The killer had driven his car onto the soft ground of Soldiers Field. The police were able to determine the tire marks as being two India Autoway tires, a Pneumant, and an Esso 110, all cross-ply. With a rear track width of between 4' 1 1/2" and 4' 2 1/2", the number of vehicles that it could apply to was twenty-six, including Ford Corsairs. A staggering 100,000 vehicles in West Yorkshire would have to be checked, and before the killer changed any of his tires.

 

23 April - Prostitute Patricia Atkinson is murdered in Bradford; she is believed to be the fourth woman to die at the hands of the mysterious Yorkshire Ripper.

 

Patricia Atkinson, aged 32, a prostitute, was the second murder victim in 1977 by Peter Sutcliffe. To the police, the Leeds killer had now expanded his territory to include Bradford. A blood sample showed that Patricia Atkinson had consumed about twenty measures of spirits. The police also found a bloody foot print on a bottom bed sheet from a size seven Dunlop Warwick wellington boot, which matched the foot prints found at the Emily Jackson murder scene. It was clear, from this, and from the injuries sustained, that the Yorkshire Ripper had now expanded his territory to include Bradford. As well, for what would be the only time, he had committed a murder indoors.

 

26 June – 16-year-old shop assistant Jayne McDonald is found battered and stabbed to death in Chapeltown, Leeds; police believe she is the fifth person to be murdered by the Yorkshire Ripper. About 30 yards into Reginald Street, near an adventure playground, Sutcliffe struck Jayne MacDonald with the hammer on the back of the head. After she fell down, he then dragged her, face down, about 20 yards into the corner of the play area. Her shoes made a "horrible scraping noise" along the ground as he dragged her. He hit her again with the hammer and then pulled her clothes up and stabbed her several times in the chest and in the back.

 

The slaying of a young girl, not connected to the prostitute trade, an "innocent", brought not only national attention to the case, and outrage from the public not seen in the earlier murder cases, but also caused Chief Constable Ronald Gregory to appoint his most senior detective, Assistant Chief Constable George Oldfield to be in overall charge of the escalating Ripper murder investigations. Peter Sutcliffe claims to have been shocked when he saw the newspaper headlines that Jayne MacDonald had not been a prostitute as he had assumed.

 

Jayne's father, Wilf MacDonald, a former railwayman, was to die two years after her murder, never having recovered from the ordeal of her murder.

 

10 July – Bradford woman Maureen Long, 42 is injured in an attack believed to have been committed by the Yorkshire Ripper in the West Yorkshire city.

 

Maureen Long had remembered going to the cloak room at the club, and walking towards the city centre. She also remembered his white Ford with the black roof. But the description of her attacker that she was able to provide - white, well-built man, aged 36 or 37, about 6ft. 1in. tall, puffy cheeks, thickish eyebrows, collar-length wiry blond hair, with noticeably large hands - relieved Peter Sutcliffe of some of his worries about being caught. His only concern was the description of his car by the nightwatchman. In August he sold the white Ford Corsair to Ronnie Barker. When it broke down, Sutcliffe reluctantly took it back, stripped the car down, and redistributed the spare parts around the replacement car he had bought in September 1977, a red Ford Corsair.

 

10 October – Missing 20-year-old prostitute Jean Jordan is found dead in Chorlton, Manchester, nine days after she was last seen alive. Police believe that the Yorkshire Ripper may have killed her; the first crime outside Yorkshire which the killer has been suspected of.

 

Jean Jordan, also known as Jean Royle, and a prostitute, was killed on October 1 1977 as the Yorkshire Ripper expanded his territory to include Manchester. The events of the murder resulted in the Yorkshire Ripper leaving a clue that could be (and was) directly traced to him. Sutcliffe would also return to the body nine days later to try and recover the incriminating £5 pound note evidence, and when he failed, would carry out the worst attack and mutilations on any of his victims.

 

The handbag had not been found on October 10th, as it was just outside the police search area. The £5 note, which Peter Sutcliffe had been searching for on his return visit to Manchester, had finally been found. The incriminating note, the police discovered, had been from a batch issued in pay packets days before the murder.

 

Unfortunately, the five day delay in its discovery, coupled with the delay caused by the fact the body had not been discovered before Sutcliffe returned to it, and other factors, such as the delay by the police it announcing its discovery and the serial number, meant that too much time had passed to further narrow the search for its owner by any public input (see £5 Note Clue for information about the hunt for the owner of the note).

 

28 October – Police in Yorkshire appeal for help in finding the Yorkshire Ripper, who is believed to be responsible for a series of murders and attacks on women across the county during the last two years.

 

14 December – 25-year-old Leeds prostitute Marilyn Moore is injured in an attack believed to have been committed by the Yorkshire Ripper.

 

Marilyn Moore, a 25-year-old prostitute, survived an attack by Peter Sutcliffe, and provided one of the best photofits of the suspect from a known Ripper victim. As well, a clue found at the scene tied this attack to the Irene Richardson murder. Her description of the car was that is was a dark coloured or maroon vehicle, about the size of a Morris Oxford. Sutcliffe was, in fact, driving his red Ford Corsair. The police found an important clue in the tire track evidence that they found at the scene of the attack on Marilyn Moore. The tire tracks where consistent with the tire track evidence found at the Irene Richardson murder scene, the same India Autoway cross-ply tires were on the front wheels. There was no doubt that the Yorkshire Ripper had been the one who had attacked Marilyn Moore.

 

1977 Timeline

 

January–June – The United Knigdom holds the Presidency of the Council of the European Union for the first time.

 

January – The Ford Fiesta goes on sale in the UK.

 

1 January – The Clash headline the gala opening of the London music club, The Roxy.

 

3 January – Roy Jenkins, the Home Secretary, announces he is leaving the House of Commons to become President of the European Commission.

 

6 January – Record company EMI sacks the controversial British punk rock group the Sex Pistols for their behaviour on ITV's Today Show, whose presenter Bill Grundy was also dismissed by his employers for inciting them.

 

10 January – Clive Sinclair introduces his new two-inch screen television set, which retails at £175.

 

29 January – Seven Provisional Irish Republican Army bombs explode in the West End of London, but there are no fatalities or serious injuries.

 

4 February - Fleetwood Mac's Grammy-winning album Rumours is released, featuring songs that include "The Chain", "Don't Stop", and "Go Your Own Way".

 

Police discover an IRA bomb factory in Liverpool.

 

5 February – 28-year-old homeless woman Irene Richardson is murdered in Leeds, at almost the exact location where prostitute Marcella Claxton was badly injured nine months ago. Police believe that this murder and attempted murder may be connected, along with the murders of Wilma McCann, Emily Jackson and the attempted murders of at least three other women.

 

10 February - Elizabeth II visits American Samoa.

 

The three IRA terrorists involved in the 1975 Balcombe Street Siege in London are sentenced to life imprisonment on six charges of murder.

 

11 February – Elizabeth II visits Western Samoa.

 

13 February – Anthony Crosland, Foreign Secretary, is seriously ill in hospital after suffering a stroke.

 

14 February – Elizabeth II visits Tonga.

 

16–17 February – Elizabeth II visits Fiji.

 

17 February – George Newman, chairman of Staffordshire County Council, is sentenced to 15 months in prison for corruption.

 

22 February – David Owen, 38, becomes the youngest post-Second World War Foreign Secretary, succeeding the late Anthony Crosland, who died 3 days earlier.

 

22 February – 7 March – Elizabeth II visits New Zealand.

 

28 February – State Opening of the Parliament of New Zealand, by Elizabeth II.

 

1 March – James Callaghan threatens to withdraw state aid to British Leyland unless it puts an end to strikes.

 

7–30 March – Elizabeth II visits Australia.

 

8 March – State Opening of the Australian Parliament, Canberra by Elizabeth II.

 

12 March – The Centenary Test between Australia and England begins at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.

 

14 March – The government reveals that inflation has pushed prices up by nearly 70% within three years.

 

15 March – British Leyland managers announce intention to dismiss 40,000 toolmakers who have gone on strike at the company's Longbridge plant in Birmingham, action which is costing the state-owned carmaker more than £10million a week.

 

17–23 March – The Prince of Wales visits Ghana.

 

19 March – The last Rover P6 rolls off the production line after 14 years.

 

23 March – Government wins a vote of no confidence in the House of Commons after James Callaghan strikes a deal with the leader of the Liberal Party, David Steel.

 

23–25 March – Elizabeth II visits Papua New Guinea.

 

29 March – Income tax is slashed to 33p in the pound from 35p in the budget.

 

31 March – Elizabeth II visits Muscat.

 

April – Mike Leigh's comedy of manners Abigail's Party opens at the Hampstead Theatre, starring Alison Steadman.

 

2 April – Red Rum wins the Grand National for the third time.

 

8 April – Punk band The Clash's debut album The Clash is released in the UK through CBS Records.

 

11 April – London Transport's Silver Jubilee buses are launched.

 

18–30 April – The Embassy World Snooker Championship moves to the Crucible Theatre, Sheffield, and attracts television coverage for the first time.

 

23 April - National Front marchers clash with anti-Nazi protesters in London.

 

Prostitute Patricia Atkinson is murdered in Bradford; she is believed to be the fourth woman to die at the hands of the mysterious Yorkshire Ripper.

 

29 April – British Aerospace is formed to run the nationalised aviation industry.

 

30 April – Mid Hants Railway reopened.

 

3 May – HMS Invincible is launched at Barrow-in-Furness by Elizabeth II.

 

5 May - Silver Jubilee review of the Police at Hendon by Elizabeth II.

 

Conservatives make gains in local council elections, including winning the Greater London Council from Labour.

 

7 May - 3rd G7 summit held in London.

 

Prime Minister of Canada Pierre Elliot Trudeau does a pirouette behind the back of Elizabeth II.

 

The 22nd Eurovision Song Contest is held in London. With Angela Rippon as the presenter, the contest is won by Marie Myriam representing France, with her song "L'oiseau et l'enfant" ("The Bird and the Child").

 

13 May – The Silver Jubilee Air Fair is held at Biggin Hill.

 

15 May – Liverpool F.C. are English league champions for the tenth time.

 

17 May – Elizabeth II commences her Jubilee tour in Glasgow.

 

18 May - The UK is among 29 signatories of a Convention on the Prohibition of Military or Any Other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques.

 

Elizabeth II visits Cumbernauld and Stirling.

 

19 May – Elizabeth II visits Perth and Dundee.

 

21 May – Manchester United win the FA Cup for the fourth time by defeating Liverpool 2-1 at Wembley Stadium in the final. It is their first major trophy since they won the European Cup in 1968.

 

23–27 May – Elizabeth II visits Edinburgh.

 

25 May – Liverpool win their first European Cup by defeating the West German league champions Borussia Mönchengladbach 3-1 in the final in Rome.

 

27 May - Elizabeth II opens the new Air Terminal Building at Edinburgh Airport.

 

Prime Minister James Callaghan officially opens the M5 motorway, which is now complete with the opening of the final stretch around Exeter, 15 years after the first stretch of the motorway (beginning near Birmingham) was opened.

 

28 May – Climax of Windsor Silver Jubilee celebrations: Elizabeth II visits the town on her Jubilee tour.

 

30 May – A gala performance for the Silver Jubilee is held at the Royal Opera House, London.

 

6–9 June – Jubilee celebrations are held in the United Kingdom to celebrate twenty-five years of Queen Elizabeth II's reign, with a public holiday on 7 June.

 

17 June – Wimbledon F.C., champions of the Isthmian League, are elected to the Football League in place of Workington in the Fourth Division.

 

20 June - Anglia Television broadcasts the fake documentary "Alternative 3". It enters into the conspiracy theory canon.

 

Seventeen people are arrested during clashes between pickets and police at the Grunwick film processing laboratory.

 

26 June – 16-year-old shop assistant Jayne McDonald is found battered and stabbed to death in Chapeltown, Leeds; police believe she is the fifth person to be murdered by the Yorkshire Ripper.

 

4 July – Manchester United manager Tommy Docherty is sensationally dismissed by the club's directors due to his affair with the wife of the club's physiotherapist.

 

7 July – The first episode of the BBC documentary series Brass Tacks is aired, featuring a debate as to whether Myra Hindley should be considered for parole from the life sentence she received for her role in the Moors Murders in 1966.

 

10 July – Bradford woman Maureen Long, 42 is injured in an attack believed to have been committed by the Yorkshire Ripper in the West Yorkshire city.

 

11 July - Gay News found guilty of blasphemous libel in a case (Whitehouse v. Lemon) brought by Mary Whitehouse's National Viewers and Listeners Association.

 

Don Revie announces his resignation after three years as manager of the England national football team.

 

12 July – Within 24 hours of resigning as manager of the England national football team, Don Revie accepts an offer to become the highest paid football manager in the world when he is appointed manager of the United Arab Emirates national football team on a four-year contract worth £340,000.

 

14 July – Manchester United appoint Dave Sexton, manager of Queen's Park Rangers and previously Chelsea, as their new manager.

 

23 July – Chrysler Europe launched the Sunbeam, a three-door rear-wheel drive small hatchback similar in concept to the Ford Fiesta and Vauxhall Chevette.

 

29 July – Finance Act abolishes the collection of tithes.

 

August – Government introduces voluntary Stage III one-year pay restraint.

 

10 August - The Queen visits Northern Ireland as part of her Jubilee celebrations under tight security.

 

Kenny Dalglish, 26-year-old Scotland striker, becomes Britain's most expensive footballer in a £440,000 transfer from Glasgow Celtic to Liverpool.

 

11 August – Cricketer Geoff Boycott scores the 100th century of his career for England against Australia at Headingley, Leeds.

 

12 August – 19 September – Union-Castle Line RMS Windsor Castle (1959) makes the line’s last passenger mail voyage out of Southampton for Cape Town, the last major British ship to operate in the regular ocean liner trade.

 

13 August – Battle of Lewisham: an attempt by the far-right National Front to march from New Cross to Lewisham in southeast London leads to counter-demonstrations and violent clashes.

 

15 August – Rioting breaks out in Birmingham during demonstrations against the National Front.

 

17 August – Ron Greenwood, general manager of West Ham United, who guided the East London club to FA Cup and European Cup Winners' Cup glory as their team manager during the 1960s, accepts an offer from the Football Association to manage the England team on a temporary basis until December.

 

23 August – A new, smaller, £1 note is introduced.

 

September – Ford launches the second generation of its popular Granada model.

 

6 September – Car industry figures show that foreign cars are outselling British-built ones for the first time. Japanese built Datsuns, German Volkswagens and French Renaults are proving particularly popular with buyers, although British-built products from Ford, British Leyland, Vauxhall and Chrysler UK are still the most popular.

 

16 September – Rock star Marc Bolan, pioneer of the glam rock movement at the start of the 1970s with T. Rex, is killed in a car crash in Barnes, London, two weeks before his 30th birthday. His girlfriend Gloria Jones, the driver of the car, is seriously injured.

 

19 September – Manchester United, the English FA Cup holders, are expelled from the European Cup Winners' Cup after their fans rioted in France during a first round first leg game with AS Saint-Etienne (which ended in a 1-1 draw) five days ago.

 

26 September - Freddie Laker launches his new budget Skytrain airline, with the first single fare from Gatwick to New York costing £59 compared to the normal price of £186.

 

UEFA reinstates Manchester United to the European Cup Winners' Cup on appeal. However, they are ordered to play their return leg against AS Saint-Etienne at least 120 miles away from their Old Trafford stadium.

 

3 October – Undertakers go on strike in London, leaving more than 800 corpses unburied.

 

10 October – Missing 20-year-old prostitute Jean Jordan is found dead in Chorlton, Manchester, nine days after she was last seen alive. Police believe that the Yorkshire Ripper may have killed her; the first crime outside Yorkshire which the killer has been suspected of.

 

14 October – Fourteen people are injured in a bomb explosion at a London pub.

 

25 October – Michael Edwardes succeeds Richard Dobson as chief of British Leyland.

 

27 October - Former Liberal leader Jeremy Thorpe denies allegations of attempted murder of and having a relationship with male model Norman Scott.

 

Never Mind The Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols is released in the United Kingdom, and the Sex Pistols perform on a boat on the River Thames shortly afterwards, only for the police to wait for them and several arrests occurred, including that of Malcolm McLaren, the band's manager at the time.

 

28 October – Police in Yorkshire appeal for help in finding the Yorkshire Ripper, who is believed to be responsible for a series of murders and attacks on women across the county during the last two years.

 

14 November – Firefighters go on their first ever national strike, in hope of getting a 30% wage increase.

 

15 November - The Queen becomes a grandmother for the first time when Princess Anne gives birth to a son.

 

The first SavaCentre hypermarket, a venture between J Sainsbury and British Home Stores, opens at Washington, Tyne and Wear.

 

22 November – British Airways inaugurates regular London to New York City supersonic Concorde service.

 

3 December – The England football team fails to achieve World Cup qualification for the second tournament in succession.

 

10 December - James Meade wins the 1977 Nobel Prize in Economics jointly with the Norwegian Bertil Ohlin for their "Pathbreaking contribution to the theory of international trade and international capital movements."

 

Nevill Francis Mott wins the Nobel Prize in Physics jointly with Philip Warren Anderson and John Hasbrouck van Vleck "for their fundamental theoretical investigations of the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems".

 

12 December - Chrysler Europe announces its new Horizon range of five-door front-wheel drive hatchbacks, which will be built in Britain as a Chrysler and France as a Simca. It will give buyers a more modern alternative to the Avenger range of rear-wheel drive saloons and estates.

 

Ron Greenwood signs a permanent contract as England manager, despite England's failure to qualify for next summer's World Cup. The appointment is controversial, as there had been widespread support for Brian Clough of Nottingham Forest to be appointed.

 

14 December – 25-year-old Leeds prostitute Marilyn Moore is injured in an attack believed to have been committed by the Yorkshire Ripper.

 

16 December – The Queen opens a £71million extension to the London Underground which runs to Heathrow Airport.

 

21 December – Four children die at a house fire in Wednesbury, West Midlands, as Green Goddess fire appliances crewed by hastily-trained troops are sent to deal with the blaze while firefighters are still on strike. 119 people have now died as a result of fires since the strike began, but this is the first fire during the strike which has resulted in more than two deaths.

 

22 December – The Queen's first grandchild is christened Peter Mark Andrew Phillips.

 

25 December – The Morecambe & Wise Christmas Show on BBC 1 television attracts an audience of more than 28 million viewers, one of the highest ever in U.K. television history.

 

27 December – The much-acclaimed Star Wars film, which has been a massive hit in the United States, is screened in British cinemas for the first time.

 

Inflation has fallen slightly this year to 15.8%, but it is the fourth successive year that has seen double digit inflation.

 

Colour television licences exceed black and white licences for the first time in the U.K.

 

Lynsey De Paul teamed up with Mike Moran as the UK entry for Eurovision in 1977, staged at Wembley Conference Centre, and finished in second place with Rock Bottom.

 

Music Events

 

1 January – The Clash headline the gala opening of the London music club, The Roxy.

 

22 January – Maria Kliegel makes her London début at the Wigmore Hall, with a programme of Bach, Kodály, and Franck.

 

26 January - Fleetwood Mac's original lead guitarist, Peter Green, is committed to a mental hospital in England after firing a pistol at a delivery boy bringing him a royalties check.

 

27 January – After releasing only one single for the band, EMI Records terminates its contract with the Sex Pistols.

 

4 February - Fleetwood Mac's Rumours is released; it goes on to become one of the best-selling albums of all time.

 

15 February – Sid Vicious replaces Glen Matlock as the bassist of the Sex Pistols.

 

10 March – A&M Records signs the Sex Pistols in a ceremony in front of Buckingham Palace. The contract is terminated on 16 March as a result of the band vandalizing property and verbally abusing employees during a visit to the record company's office.

 

2 May – Elton John performs the first of six consecutive nights at London's Rainbow Theatre, his first concert in eight months. John keeps a low profile in 1977, not releasing any new music for the first year since his recording career began eight years previously.

 

7 May – Having been postponed from 2 April because of a BBC technicians' strike, the 22nd Eurovision Song Contest finally goes ahead in London's Wembley Conference Centre.

 

11 May – The Stranglers and support band London start a 10-week national tour.

 

12 May - Virgin Records announces that they have signed the Sex Pistols.

 

7 June – The Sex Pistols attempt to interrupt Silver Jubilee celebrations for Queen Elizabeth II by performing "God Save the Queen" from a boat on the River Thames. Police force the boat to dock and several arrests are made following a scuffle.

 

12 June - Guitarist Michael Schenker vanishes after a UFO concert at The Roundhouse in London. He is replaced for several months by Paul Chapman until he appears again to rejoin the group in October.

 

15 June – The Snape Maltings Training Orchestra makes its London debut at St John's, Smith Square.

 

25 June – The Young Musicians' Symphony Orchestra of London, conducted by James Blair, gives the belated première of William Walton's 1962 composition Prelude for Orchestra.

 

6 July - During a Pink Floyd concert before a crowd of 80,000 at Olympic Stadium in Montreal, Bassist Roger Waters having become increasingly irritated by a fan until he exerts his frustration by spitting on him. The incident becomes the catalyst for the group's next album, The Wall.

 

22 July – The first night of The Proms is broadcast by BBC Radio 3 for the first time in quadraphonic sound.

 

26 July – Led Zeppelin cancels the last seven dates of their American tour after lead singer Robert Plant learns that his six-year-old son Karac has died of a respiratory virus. The show two days before in Oakland proves to be the band's last ever in the United States.

 

1 September – World première at the Royal Albert Hall in London of the expanded version of Luciano Berio's Coro.

 

16 September – T.Rex frontman Marc Bolan is killed in an automobile accident.

 

27 October - The Sex Pistols release their controversial album Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols, which would be their only studio album.

 

Number-one singles

 

Wings - Mull Of Kintyre

Abba - Name Of The Game

Baccara - Yes Sir I Can Boogie

David Soul - Silver Lady

Elvis Presley - Way Down

The Floaters - Float On

Brotherhood Of Man - Angelo

Donna Summer - I Feel Love

Hot Chocolate - So You Win Again

The Jacksons - Show You The Way To Go

Kenny Rogers - Lucille

Rod Stewart - I Dont Want To Talk About It

Deniece Williams - Free

Abba - Knowing Me Knowing You

Abba - The Name of the Game

Manhattan Transfer - Chanson DAmour

Leo Sayer - When I Need You

Julie Covington - Dont Cry For Me Argentina

Johnny Mathis - When a Child is Born

David Soul - Dont Give Up On Us

 

Television

 

Mike Yarwood's 1977 Christmas Show tops the list of most-watched Christmas programmes.

 

27 March – Jesus of Nazareth, a British-Italian television miniseries dramatizing the birth, life, ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus based on the accounts in the four New Testament Gospels debuts on British television, starring Robert Powell as Jesus.

 

28 March – Yorkshire Television and Tyne Tees Television launch a nine-week breakfast television experiment. It is credited as being the United Kingdom's first breakfast television programme, six years before the launch of TV-am and the BBC's Breakfast Time. Both programmes run at the same time, with Tyne Tees, Good Morning North, and Yorkshire's Good Morning Calendar. Both programmes finish on Friday 27 May.

 

22 April – The original series of motoring programme Top Gear begins as a local magazine format produced by BBC Midlands from its Pebble Mill Studios in Birmingham, presented by Angela Rippon and Tom Coyne. In 1978 it is offered to BBC2 where it airs until 2001. In 2002 the series is relaunched in a new format.

 

7 May – The 22nd Eurovision Song Contest is held in London. With Angela Rippon as the presenter, the contest is won by Marie Myriam representing France, with her song "L'oiseau et l'enfant" ("The Bird and the Child").

 

6 June-9 June – Television viewers in Britain and around the world watch live coverage of the celebrations of the Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II, while the soap opera Coronation Street features an elaborate Jubilee parade in the storyline, having Rovers' Return Inn manageress Annie Walker dress up in elaborate costume as Queen Elizabeth I. Ken Barlow and "Uncle Albert" play Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing respectively.

 

20 June – Anglia Television broadcasts the fake documentary "Alternative 3". It enters into the conspiracy theory canon.

 

7 July – The first episode of the BBC documentary series Brass Tacks is aired, featuring a debate as to whether Myra Hindley should be considered for parole from the life sentence she received for her role in the Moors Murders in 1966.

 

7 September – The Krypton Factor makes its debut on ITV.

 

18 September – The occasional ITV bloopers programme It'll be Alright on the Night is first aired.

 

1 October – Ian Trethowan succeeds Charles Curran as Director-General of the BBC.

 

26 November – Southern Television broadcast interruption: Just after 5.10pm in the Southern Television ITV region, a hoaxer hijacks the sound of Independent Television News from the IBA transmitter at Hannington, Hampshire, and broadcasts a message claiming to be Asteron of the Ashtar Galactic Command. Thousands of viewers ring STV, ITN or the police for an explanation; the identity of the intruder was never confirmed.

 

25 December – Both the Mike Yarwood Christmas Show and The Morecambe & Wise Christmas Show on BBC 1 attracts an audience of more than 28 million, one of the highest ever in U.K. television history.

 

Scum, an entry in BBC1's Play for Today anthology strand, is pulled from transmission due to controversy over its depiction of life in a Young Offenders' Institution (at this time known in the U.K. as a borstal). Two years later the director Alan Clarke makes a film version with most of the same cast, and the original play itself is eventually transmitted on Channel Four in 1991.

 

Colour television licenses exceed black and white licenses for the first time in the U.K.

 

BBC1

 

2 January – Wings (1977–1978)

15 February – Take Hart (1977–1983)

12 April – Citizen Smith (1977–1980)

7 July – Brass Tacks (1977–1988)

7 September – Secret Army (1977–1979)

17 October – Des O'Connor Tonight (1977–2002)

 

ITV

 

11 January – Robin's Nest (1977–1981)

8 May – King of the Castle (1977)

18 May – A Bunch of Fives (1977–1978)

6 September – You're Only Young Twice (1977–1981)

7 September – The Krypton Factor (1977–1995, 2009–2010)

18 September – It'll Be Alright On The Night (1977–present)

30 December – The Professionals (1977–1983)

Foresthill Bridge

North Fork of the American River

Placer County, California

 

The Foresthill Bridge over the North Fork of the American River is located near the town of Auburn, California, USA. The US Bureau of Reclamation commissioned the design and construction of this bridge during the 1970's in anticipation of the completion of the Auburn Dam. The bridge was constructed to replace the original road (visible just above the river) from Auburn to Foresthill. That road would have been submerged as much as 550-ft below the surface of Auburn Reservoir, however, uncertainties about earthquake faulting were discovered in the area of the dam, so construction was stopped and has never been restarted.

 

This photo was taken at a distance of 3,700 ft (0.70 miles) from from the bridge. It's not often that you have to back up that far to get a full frame shot of your subject at 28mm focal length (45 mm film equivalent)!

 

Bridge Factoids:

- The Foresthill Bridge is 730-ft tall as measured from the bridge deck to the American River below.

- It is the highest bridge crossing in California, the third highest in the United States, and the ninth highest in the world.

- The bridge is approximately 2,000-ft in length.

- Construction was completed in 1973 at a cost of nearly $13 million.

- The footings for the two prominent concrete towers are about 100-ft by 100-ft wide and founded as much as 80-ft below ground due to poor rock quality on the slopes of the hillside.

- The bridge is often used by BASE Jumpers as a parachuting platform.

- A stunt for the movie "XXX" was shot here; it included the launching of a Chevrolet Corvette convertible over the edge of the deck with a BASE Jumper in the vehicle.

- An episode of "Stunt Junkies" was filmed here featuring a parchute jump from a helicopter above the bridge followed by a "swooping" of the bridge deck, cut-away of the main chute, a new free-fall over the bridge railing and a BASE jump chute deployment thereafter -- all in one continuous stunt!

 

I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to research seismic deficiencies and to work on potential seismic retrofit strategies for this structure before the County temporarily terminated retrofit work due to a lack of funding.

 

Very cool automated 360-degree virtual tour of this area is located

here

 

Original caption based upon personal and public information.

Wells Fargo & Co. Express

Constructed in 1853

Photo taken September 2006 at a Structure Age of 153 Years

French Corral Mining Camp / Gold Town

Nevada County, California

 

The gold mining camp named French Corral was established in 1849. It is located about 8 miles northwest of Nevada City in the northern reaches of California’s “Gold Country”. As with most mining camps of the gold rush era, the name came ready-made from the local terrain and inhabitants - here, from the presence of a French settler who had a horse corral in the area. The earliest western long distance phone line passed through French Camp in 1878 to connect mining sites throughout the region. The 60 mile line was constructed at a cost of about $6,000, an average of $100 per mile. The Wells Fargo building is the last remnant of French Corral from the Gold Rush era.

 

If only this location had an ATM!

 

The location of this photo has been mapped on Flickr.

 

I wish I had been able to get a "perspective", or more 3D view of the building. With the only lens I own (28-135 zoom), I could not move left or right (blocked by trees), forward (would only capture part of the building) or backward (private property). A good wide angle lens would have sufficed nicely. I have many ideas for a reshoot when I get back there someday with a wider array of photographic equipment. Note the hefty 1.5 stop underexposure bias ... I was trying to preserve the color and detail in the bright areas without losing too much in the shadows. Even after adjustment, it gives the entire exposure a dark hue, but the color and saturation are better than I usually get in exposures without bias.

South Yuba River Bridge

Old Highway 49 Bridge across the South Yuba River

Nevada County, California

 

The rising popularity of the automobile in the 1920’s created a need for new roads and bridges. The State of California began building this rainbow-arch style concrete bridge in October 1921 and completed it in early 1922. Prior to this time, traffic to North San Juan or Downieville crossed the river at the existing Purdon’s Crossing Bridge about five miles upstream, or at the Jones Bar Bridge, which was dismantled in 1918, one mile downstream. In 1993, the California Department of Transportation built the present Highway 49 Bridge. The old bridge continues to service pedestrian traffic.

[Note: historical description is from a State informational kiosk at the site].

 

Location

39°17'53.21"N, 121° 5'21.33"W

39.29811,-121.08926

 

You've GOT to see the flood photo at this location by viewing the following link:

 

www.flickr.com/photos/moodyweaver/80015122/

 

South Yuba River Bridge (II)

Old Highway 49 Bridge across the South Yuba River

Nevada County, California

 

The rising popularity of the automobile in the 1920’s created a need for new roads and bridges. The State of California began building this rainbow-arch style concrete bridge in October 1921 and completed it in early 1922. Prior to this time, traffic to North San Juan or Downieville crossed the river at the existing Purdon’s Crossing Bridge about five miles upstream, or at the Jones Bar Bridge, which was dismantled in 1918, one mile downstream. In 1993, the California Department of Transportation built the present Highway 49 Bridge. The old bridge continues to service pedestrian traffic. [Note: historical description is from a State informational kiosk at the site].

 

Location

39°17'53.21"N, 121° 5'21.33"W

39.29811,-121.08926

American River Confluence

Middle Fork and North Fork of the American River

Placer County, California

 

This photo was taken at the confluence of the North Fork (background) and Middle Fork (foreground) of the American River near Auburn, California, USA. Just a few miles upstream from this location, gold was "first" discovered by James Marshall at Sutter's Mill in the river town of Coloma, California. That event set-off one of the greatest gold rushes in history. Gold panners still work this area today.

Iowa Hill Bridge

Iowa Hill Road at the North Fork of the American River

Placer County, California

 

The Iowa Hill Bridge is a twin of the Yankee Jims Bridge about 4.5 miles downstream. This is California gold country made famous by the Gold Rush of 1849!

 

Even on the day I shot this photograph, there were miners still working their dredges, sluice boxes and gold pans for the valuable placer gold that still exists in the hills and waters of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Gold seekers are warned to obey posted mining claims and private property. No claim jumpers allowed!

 

The Bridge

 

The 150± foot long, one-lane steel cable suspension bridge was constructed circa 1928 to serve as a reliable all-season link between the gold towns of Colfax and Iowa Hill, California. Cables are anchored into bedrock and supported by short steel towers resting on stone masonry piers at each end of the structure. This historic bridge has been closed to vehicular traffic, but remains servicable for pedestrians and cyclists. A new bridge for vehicular traffic has been constructed just downstream.

 

Location

 

39° 5'59.76"N, 120°55'29.38"W

39.09993,-120.92483

 

Local History

 

The town of Colfax was originally settled in 1851 as a supply depot and transportation crossroad for gold miners who came to California as part of the 1849 Gold Rush. A decade later the country was entangled in the Civil War. As a result, the Lincoln administration backed construction of a transcontinental railroad which they viewed as an investment to keep western states and territories from seceding from the Union, as well as a vehicle to provide wealth and resources to the North. Colfax found itself on the original transcontinental railroad alignment, and just a few miles from one of the most challenging topographic and geologic hurdles on the entire route – the Capehorn Promontory, a rail grade hewn from solid rock more than 1,300 feet above the North Fork of the American River. Colfax, originally known as Illinoistown, is named in honor of Schuyler Colfax who, in 1868, was elected vice-president of the United States on the Republican ticket headed by Ulysses S. Grant.

 

Gold was discovered in the vicinity of Iowa Hill in 1853 and by 1856 the local gold production was estimated at $100,000 weekly. The total value of gold produced near Iowa Hill has been estimated at $20,000,000 (see current dollar equivalents below). The town was destroyed by fire in 1857 and again in 1862, but each time the town was rebuilt with more substantial structures. The last fire to destroy the town occurred in 1920. [Note: Iowa Hill information is from California State Historical Marker No. 401].

 

Interesting

 

In 2005 dollars, the $100,000.00 weekly gold haul from 1856 Iowa Hill is worth:

$2.29 million weekly using the Consumer Price Index

$1.80 million weekly using the GDP deflator

$16.69 milliion weekly using the unskilled wage

$29.68 million weekly using the nominal GDP per capita

 

In 2005 dollars, the $20,000,000.00 total haul of gold from 1856 Iowa Hill is worth:

$458 million total using the Consumer Price Index

$361 million total using the GDP deflator

$3.34 BILLION total using the unskilled wage

$5.94 BILLION total using the nominal GDP per capita

 

Links to other items of related historical interest:

 

Chinese-American Contribution to the Transcontinental Railroad

Joe Henderson runs a powerful team of 22 malamutes that can pull several thousand pounds of supplies loaded onto a "train" of 3 sleds - enough supplies for 4 months of unsupported arctic travel.

LOCATION:

 

Sitka is located on the west coast of Baranof Island, fronting the Pacific Ocean on Sitka Sound, in southeast Alaska. It is 95 miles southwest of Juneau and 185 miles northwest of Ketchikan.

 

CLIMATE:

 

The climate of Sitka is maritime, with relatively warm winters, cool summers, and heavy precipitation. January temperatures range from 23°F to 35°F; summer temperatures vary from 48°F to 61°F. Average annual precipitation is 94 inches.

 

CULTURE AND HISTORY:

 

Now primarily a non-native community, Sitka is also home to Tlingit and Haida Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts. Russian and native influences, arts, and artifacts remain a part of the local culture. Sitka was originally inhabited by a major tribe of Tlingit Indians, who called the village Shee Atika. The site was named New Archangel in 1799, as the capital of Russian America. During the mid-1800s, Sitka was the major port on the North Pacific coast, with ships coming from many nations. Furs destined for European and Asian markets were the main export, but fish, lumber, and ice were also exported to Hawaii, Mexico, and California. After the purchase of Alaska by the United States in 1867, Sitka remained the capital of the territory until 1906, when the seat of government was moved to Juneau.

 

A Presbyterian missionary, Sheldon Jackson, started a school in the village, and in 1878 one of the first canneries in Alaska was built in Sitka. In the early 1900s, gold mines also contributed to its growth. During World War II, the town was fortified, and the U.S. Navy built an air base on Japonski Island, across the harbor. After the war, the Bureau of Indian Affairs converted some of the buildings to be used as a boarding school for Alaska native children. The U.S. Coast Guard now maintains the air station and other facilities on the island. A large pulp mill began operations in 1957.

 

ATHABASCAN INDIANS (ATHABASKAN) - There are eleven Athabascan-speaking groups in Alaska: the Tanaina (Dena’ina), Ingalik (Deg Het’an), Holikachuk, Koyukon, Tanana, Kutchin (Gwich’in), Han, Upper Tanana, Tanacross, Ahtna, and Upper Kuskokwim. They occupy vast areas of the interior of the state, stretching from Cook Inlet in the south to above the Arctic Circle in the north, and from the Canadian border in the east almost to the Bering Sea in the west. The Eyak Indians of Prince William Sound, now extinct as a people, were similar in culture to the Alaskan Athabascan groups, although the Eyak language was only very distantly related to the Athabascan languages.

 

While there are cultural differences among the different groups, their languages are closely related, and all share a subsistence-based way of life. In addition, all but those people living along the lower Yukon River are matrilineal; descent is determined through the mother, and tribal members belong to the clan of their mother, which in turn belongs to one of two divisions of Athabascan society called moieties. Tribal ceremonies such as the potlatch and stick dance, both associated with funerals, continue to be an important part of Athabascan life. There are approximately 13,700 Athabascan people living in Alaska today.

 

SOUTHEAST ALASKAN INDIANS - The Indians of the Alaska "panhandle" live in an archipelago of heavily forested islands and the coastal area of the mainland, with deep fjords interspersed with glaciers. The Tlingit Indians are the most numerous of the southeast peoples, with a population of approximately 20,000; there are about 1,800 Haida Indian people; and there are about 2,400 Tsimshian Indians.

 

All three peoples belong to the Northwest Coast culture area, characterized by the use of clan houses with elaborately carved crests and house posts with carvings of important clan animals ("totem poles") and the institution of the potlatch, complex public ceremonies in which vast amounts of goods were given away or destroyed. The Tsimshian of Metlakatla, while from a similar cultural background, were a Christian settlement founded by immigrants from Canada in the mid-19th century. Today all three groups depend on fishing and logging for their economic survival; some of the traditional ways of life are still practiced.

 

TLINGIT - In the eighteenth century the Tlingit occupied nearly all of what is today southeastern Alaska, portions of northern British Columbia, and part of the Yukon Territory of Canada. Beginning in the mid-eighteenth century, some Haida migrated into southeastern Alaska and their descendants remain neighbors to the Tlingit. The Tlingit language is unique but shows some grammatical relationship to Athabaskan languages.

 

Traditionally, the Tlingit were a matrilineal society and according to the earliest explorers, women were frequently in charge of trading expeditions. Today, most members still recognize the principle of matrilineal succession. They had developed some highly sophisticated art forms, particularly in the areas of woodcarving and the weaving of blankets and robes. Today, Tlingit art forms a major portion of Northwest Coast collections in museums around the world.

 

HAIDA - The Alaska Haida were located in the traditional villages of Howkan, Koinglas, Klinquan, Sukkwan, and Kasaan; most of the people of these villages relocated to the villages of Hydaburg and Craig as well Ketchikan, Seattle and other urban centers. Today, Kasaan has a sparse Haida population. Hydaburg is the last organized Haida community in Alaska.

 

In the 1700s, the Haida traveled to Prince of Wales Island from British Columbia’s Queen Charlotte Islands. The Haida erected their own clan houses and totem poles. By the early 1800s, the Haida were doing a booming business providing otter pelts for foreign fur traders.

 

Haida were known for their intrepid seafaring in some of the world’s most perilous seas.

 

TSIMSHIAN - The Tsimshian people of Alaska came from British Columbia where they lived in villages known as Port Simpson, (old) Metlakatla, and Ckain. In the mid-eighteen hundreds William Duncan, a missionary sent by the Church of England, lived with the Tsimshian people and established a Christian community. He taught the people the Bible, how to weave and make clothing and other known trades. In addition, Duncan successfully negotiated with President Grover Cleveland for the entire 86,000-acre Annette Island which is where the Tsimshian permanently settled. Today the only Indian reservation in Southeast Alaska, Annette Island and its only town of Metlakatla is governed by a mayor and 12-member council.

 

GOVERNMENT:

 

Sitka was incorporated under Alaska law as a unified home-rule municipality in 1971, with a unified city and borough government . It also has an Indian Reorganization Act village council, headed by a chairman. Shareholders in the village corporation also hold shares in Sealaska Corporation regional native corporation.

Yankee Jims Waterfall

Yankee Jims Road

Placer County, California

 

Just a little experiment here to learn more about photographing waterfall scenes. Notes to self for next time: 1) one-fifth the leaves or bring chainsaw, 2) 5 times more water flow or don't come in August, 3) find bigger waterfall, 4) take photo lessons. I DO love how the tree is growing on top of a rock! This wonderful little setting is on Yankee Jim's Road, a remote area in the Gold Country of California. Can you imagine sitting here and finding gold nuggets too? Now you're just dreaming!

 

Location

39° 2'21.00"N, 120°53'42.05"W

39.03917, -120.89501

Victorian Home – Circa 1860

Photo taken September 2006 at a Structure Age of 140+ Years

522 East Broad Street

Nevada City, California

 

This stunning Victorian home is located at the top of Broad Street in a neighborhood of similar historic homes. I highly recommend viewing the HUGE version of this one to appreciate the detail of its woodwork, doors, stained glass, stone foundation and prominent spire.

 

Nevada City was twice burned to its foundations, first in 1856 and again in 1863. The oldest surviving structures today were rebuilt from their stone and masonry frames, or constructed anew after the last major fire.

 

Nevada City was a major center of banking, commerce and justice during the California Gold Rush era throughout the mid to late 19th Century. It was originally settled in 1849 under various names that included Coyoteville and Deer Creek Dry Diggings. The name Nevada, a Spanish word meaning “covered with snow” was bestowed upon the town in the 1850’s. When the neighboring territory later chose the same name to be adopted into statehood, the town’s name was changed to Nevada City to avoid confusion.

 

The location of this photo has been mapped on Flickr.

 

Notes to the Mentor My Photography, Please! Group:

Again, I wish the opportunities had been better for a "perspective", or more 3D view of the building. Trees blocked views to the left and power lines blocked better views to the right. Note the hefty underexposure bias ... I was trying to preserve the detail of the bright white. I find that the color and saturation are better than I usually get in exposures without bias though the details in shadow are definitely compromised.

I remember a book,Two Log Crossing, as a teen, it discussed a dangerous journey in the Alaskan winter. It railed about the danger of a single log crossing over water. As if a two log crossing would not be dangerous! I think I will stay on this side of James Creek, thank you. It does not look like much of a stream but it is way overloaded now and could immediately sweep you off your feet and kill you an boulders is a few feet. I'll pass.

 

This shot is taken from the old Ward Road which runs just next to the tumult at places. The road is closed to motorized travel above Jamestown and is near the last habitable cabin above the closure. There are still several weeks of run off until the stream settles down. Summer in the high country often waits until July.

 

The canyon is steep and narrow and it seems like the winds don't reach down into the twisting canyon. I find the fly fishing is better when the drop approaches 6% and slows as the grade flattens. When encountered the Merc's Happy Hour, residents of Jamestown call the area a banana belt. I'd like to think a summer spent here would be mellow. I need to make another foray up the creek sometime soon.

 

Old wagons would have been in SLOW freight service on the old Ward Road where I am standing, supplying goods to the area mining camps like New Providence up ahead and Ward, on Peak-to-Peak Hwy. Recently, Phil and I could not spot the remains of New Providence on Google even though we have been there and poked around the remains.

 

I drove to the old mining town of Jamestown, Boulder County, Colorado and after shooting "The Merc," headed up James Creek carrying the big camera. I was on a mission to snag some shots at Jamestown. Early on I spied this scene near the creek. It is nearly surrounded by green. Originally, James Creek did not carry the water it does today. I suspect that a water diversion added water to the creek originally to run the Wano ore mill above the town. There is a second diversion a short way up the stream. It directed water around to the mill on the hillside. The old Wano mill is long gone now. A lot of this camp probably dates from after the demonitization of silver and attention returned to gold.

 

Thunder storms were slowly building. Jamestown has the hill in the background up to the Golden Age mine, There is one tree remaining on the hiill, left from a recent serious fire. Jamestown was an early mountain town started just after the gold rush. I wanted to look for possible scenes I have yet to discover. I opted for this scene under the coming overcast. I hoped the sky would present possibilities later. I knew I'd have some work to try to contain the range so I extracted three layers. I wandered up the creek and took some detail shots that were available,

  

Berkeley Mills works with "craftsmen in Ishikawa, Japan, who are the winners of Japan’s national award for shoji makers. Our shoji use traditional materials such as Alaskan cedar, spruce, and kiso hinoki, a fragrant cedar often used in temples and teahouses. The translucent rice-paper panels are made by hand."-2023

Thick cuts (2" and 3") by Alaskan Chainsaw Mill

Title: Canadian forest industries 1897-1899

Identifier: canadianforest189799donm

Year: 1899 (1890s)

Authors:

Subjects: Lumbering; Forests and forestry; Forest products; Wood-pulp industry; Wood-using industries

Publisher: Don Mills, Ont. : Southam Business Publications

Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

TO CANADA LUMBERMAN Volume XIX. Number 5. } CROWN LANDS OF ONTARIO. The annual report of the Commissioner of Crown Lands for Ontario, recently issued, states that the total revenue from woods and forests for the fiscal year of 1897 amounted to $1,- 327,140.08. Of this $190,918.90 was on account of bonuses and $54,166.62 on account of ground rent, leaving the net revenue from timber dues, etc., $1,082,054.56. The revenue from timber dues was larger than was expected at the beginning of the year. The accounts for timber dues accrue due in the month of December subsequent to the winter in which the cutting takes place, and are paid more or less promptly, according to the condition of the trade. The out- put of saw logs,etc., for the winter of 1895-96 was the largest in the his- tory of the province, representing the sum of over one mil- lion dollars for tim- ber dues alone. These dues did not become payable un- til December, 1896, and a considerable portion of them would not be paid until the year 1897. Owing to the con- tinued depression in the lumber trade and the uncertainty prevailing as to the re-imposition of an import duty on sawn lumber passing into the United States, it was expected that payments would not be made so freely and punctual as usual ; conse- quently the estimate of revenue from woods and forests was not increased in proportion to the large increase in accruals. When it became evident that an import duty would be imposed on lumber pass- ing into the United States, heavy purchases were made for that market, and some of our own lum- bermen shipped their lumber over there and piled it up, this action being taken in advance of tariff legislation, the object in both cases being to escape the duty. The sales improved the finan- cial position and consequently larger payments were made than was looked for, the result of which has been the increased revenue collected from timber dues. For some time past, says the commissioner, there has been considerable excitement over the discovery of gold in the region lying north and east of Lake Wahnapitae, and large numbers of prospectors and miners had flocked into the TORONTO, ONT„ Mf\Y, 1898 townships of Kelly, Davis, Rathbun and Scad- ding. These men had spent considerable money in developing the prospects which they had dis- covered, and in order to render them valuable and make sale of them they had been pressing the department for title. The department had been averse to opening these townships for sale, lease or settlement because the pine timber had not been sold, and it was feared that in clearing, etc., fire would be used to such an extent that bush fires would certainly ensue and the pine timber would be destroyed. Early last spring the department was very strongly pressed to allow titles to issue, and so pronounced did the

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Timber Cove near Quebec. feeling become that threats were made through the press and in correspondence and otherwise that if the timber stood in the way of the opening up of the townships it would be burned up. In view of these facts and of the presence of such an army of prospectors as had rushed in, the posi- tion became acute and the department reluctantly concluded that it would be necessary to sell the timber in order to realize the bonus, put the timber under license, and then place on the shoulders of those who would buy it the respon- sibility of watching it and cutting from time to time whatever quantity might be damaged or was in danger. This course it was felt would relieve the intense feeling prevailing in the locality. The sale was held on the 17th of August last, and 280 miles were offered for sale, of which 159^ were sold for $265,162.50, or an average bonus of $1,665.07 per square mile. Considering the quantity of pine on the limits and its charac- J Terms,$1.00 Per Year. 1 Single Copies, 10 Cents. ter, the showing was as good a one, so far as the price was concerned, as any previous one. STATEMENT OF TIMBER CUT. The area covered by timber license is 16,400 acres. Following is a comparative statement of the principal kinds of timber cut during 1896-97 : Pine saw logs 477 7l6.448 feet B M. Other saw logs . 8,758,716 ri 11 Boom and dimension timber, pine 26,084,737 " " „ I, ,1 n other 706,860 11 11 Square timber, white pine 1,977,400 cubic feet. ,1 11 birch, ash, oak 28,000 11 11 Cedar 254,144 lineal feet. Railway ties 278,955 pieces. Telegraph poles 593 11 Stave and shingle bolts 1,466 cords. West India staves 7,700 feet. Pulp wood 46,338 cords. By surveys made it was ascertained that there were to be found, in the township of Burwash, Nipissing district, white pine, red pine, balsam, spruce, cedar, tama- rac, birch, poplar, maple, oak, black ash and elm, the last three in small quantities; in town- ship of Cherriman, small poplar, birch spruce and balsam; in township of Jen- nings, second growth poplar, birch, spruce, tama- rac and pitch pine on the high lands, and willow and alder on the low ; in township of Lon- don, scattered white pine, small poplar and pitch pine ; in township of Curtis, district of Algoma, cedar, tamarac, maple, birch, bal- sam and spruce, the latter found in large quanti- ties suitable for pulp wood ; in township of Har- row, small jack pine, white birch, poplar, maple, beech and hemlock ; in eastern part of township of Tupper, bird's eye maple, white and black birch, with small quantities of balsam and spruce; in township of Sanford, spruce, tamarac and small pine ; in township of Zealand, Rainy River district, poplar, spruce, birch and cedar. All the lumber mills in Washington are now running full time, and the increase in output will be greatly in excess of last year. During the past two months the shipments of lumber amounted to 1,050 carloads, against 780 for the same period last year. The shipments of cedar shingles during two months were over 1,200 carloads. The Alaskan demand for lum- ber is great, over 10,000,000 feet having been shipped this spring.

  

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These are the rough blanks for the stair treads to the library stairs (arcing around the cherry tree). We used an Alaskan sawmill to cut up an 18" diameter birch tree, julienne style. The slabs are 2" thick, and the finish treads will be eliptical... with eliptical wood grain. They'll need to air dry for a few months before milling.

Ginger red onion marmalade on a rich smoked cod fillet that shouldered a caramelized crust sat on a creamy squash ravioli surrounded by Matsutake mushrooms and aromatic broth. A pickled radish stick finished the course, it's crisp texture and mildly tart flavours shone like a beacon against the sea of subtleties. Wonderful aromas but subtle flavours (save for that gorgeous sweet relish). The pasta was also well done - a tribute to Mills' stint at the River Cafe (and also reminding us of the great pasta we had at Cibo Trattoria, another RC alumni) but filled with a neutral, although finely pureed squash. My dining companion noted that the addition of truffles would be key to this course, of which I felt the contrary, believing that that pungent aroma would displace the subtleties that were central to this course. I felt the over cooked sheet of pork belly superfluous - adding neither dimension and taking away from the enjoyment of the course (a fattier, BBQ cut would add depth to the broth), however the side of pine mushroom and rapini florets were a great add on option, and the crowning toothpick thin pickled radish stick excellent.

 

"The fragrand white Matsutake (pine mushrooms) in this dish grow wild in the Pacific Northwest. This fall, Chris picke his supply for the menu at his secret mushroom patch. He wouldn't say exactly where this secret patch grows, but he did hint that it is north of Whistler."

 

Paired with the Sandhill "Small Lots" Voignier, British Columbia

This photo is available for purchase at www.AuroraHunter.com

 

Autumn was here. Ahhhhh. After a typical crazy Alaskan summer it's always nice to see darkness return to the skies - and with it, the Aurora! This years fall project was to explore the Kennicott area in the Wrangell / St. Elias National Park. Built in the early 1900's on a huge copper deposit, the Kennecott Mill Site (note spelling difference) has partially withstood the test of time...and partially weathered into a captivating ghost mine with a very nostalgic allure to it. The artistic appeal had me hooked, and with it, an uncontrollable desire to photograph the Aurora dancing over the rustic red structures. It was going to be a treasure hunt.

 

On a September backpacking trip I didn't get lucky with the Aurora so October 1st found me once again driving down that 60 mile stretch of gravel road from Chitina to the McCarthy area. I parked at the Tram Station and now had to face a dilemma. After crossing the footbridge over the Kennicott River, how was I going to get 2 weeks worth of food and gear, probably a 150 pound load, up the little 5 mile gravel road to Kennecott. At this point I struck a great fortune - the operator of the Tram Station offered me his Subaru, which was on the other side of the river. Yes! (Thanks Randy!!). The vehicle also served as a huge bear-proof container to store my food in. I threw my sleeping pad in the back and that Subaru became my home away from home.

 

On that very first lucky night, the treasure was uncovered. I drove up the hill to the mine, found my favorite northward viewing angle, set up both tripods & cameras, and cooked up some noodles. The sky was clear, and just as I finished up my meal, a green Auroral band materialized out of thin air, right over the mine! It got brighter and brighter....then faded....then returned with a few of its friends and soon four bands were dancing through the Big Dipper and over the mine. A full moon in the sky lit up the snow on nearby Mt. Donoho and on the surrounding Wrangell Mountains, but the mine was just not quite catching the moonlight. I thought it might be like this so I had thrown in my million candle-power spotlight. I plugged it into the Soob's cigarette lighter, and after clicking the camera shutter open, I would 'paint' the buildings with a beam of light for several seconds. I experimented a lot since this was the first time I've tried this technique but was quite happy with the results. From the very beginning this whole experience was truly treasurable and the photographic reward is depicted here in "Kennecott Treasures."

 

"The fragrand white Matsutake (pine mushrooms) in this dish grow wild in the Pacific Northwest. This fall, Chris picke his supply for the menu at his secret mushroom patch. He wouldn't say exactly where this secret patch grows, but he did hint that it is north of Whistler."

 

Chef Chris Mills, a fisherman, a sometimes mushroom forager... what else does he do? We learnt more on that matter as the evening progressed.

 

Paired with the Sandhill "Small Lots" Voignier, British Columbia

ms660 and alaskan 36" mill

Alaskan Black Cod, BBQ Pork Belly & Squash Dumpling in a Matsutake Mushroom Broth

 

served with Sandhill "Small Lots" Viognier, British Columbia

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Alaskan Black Cod, BBQ Pork Belly & Squash Dumpling in a Matsutake Mushroom Broth

 

served with Sandhill "Small Lots" Viognier, British Columbia

Alaskan Black Cod, BBQ Pork Belly & Squash Dumpling in a Matsutake Mushroom Broth

 

served with Sandhill "Small Lots" Viognier, British Columbia

Sockeye, or "red", salmon mill in a stream near Seward, Alaska.

Cerrillos, New Mexico. Cerrillos, New Mexico, is where Young Guns was filmed in 1987.

 

Antonio Simoni

 

(Written by Mildred Beach for the June 11, 1979 edition of The Rustler. All material used was submitted by Emma Montoya and Edith and Corina Simoni.)

 

Born in 1877, one hundred and two years ago in Italy was a man by the name of Antonio Simoni. Tony had dreams, dreams of a new country and of coal and gold. At the age of 25, he left the little village of Santa Andrea, 65 miles from Rome, and came to the land which had filled his mind for years. In 1904, Tony landed in New York and during the next four years worked his way across the country into the coal fields of Wyoming. Even then he listened and heard much of richer fields in New Mexico.

 

Tony was a true adventurer. Not a tall man , his lack of height was made up by his strength of body and mind. He had determination and pride, afraid of nothing and willing to accept any challenge.

 

On 1908, he returned to Italy and to his school sweetheart, Rosina Silvestre. They were married in 1909. Rosina must have loved him very much to leave her family and friends and cross the ocean into an entirely new country! As before, they made their way through Chicago but instead of returning to Wyoming, they settled in Madrid. Tony had heard that the Colorado Fuel and Iron Co. was operating some of the highest grade anthracite and bituminous mines in the country. The anthracite was used commercially as far east as Chicago, west to San Francisco, to Alaskan salmon fleets and heaters in the coaches of the Santa Fe Railroad. Nearly all of it was burnable.

 

Tony's family grew: Emma born in 1910, Johnny in 1911 and Freddy in 1914. It was during this time that Tony met John Mitchell, founder of United Mine Workers and champion of the 40 hour week. Tony began talking unionization. In 1915, the company superintendent gave him 24 hours to leave town.

 

This changed his life. He moved his family into Cerrillos, the supply and entertainment center of southern Santa Fe County. At that time there were several hotels, seven saloons, dry goods store, markets, two churches, a mill and railroad depot. On a main corner, where at one time Tiffany's Restaurant reigned in its glory, Tony took up saloon keeping. The much talked about bar was shaped like a horseshoe with beautiful hand carving. It was later taken into Old Town in Albuquerque. Tony made new friends, cattlemen and business people. Rosina, still homesick for Italy, felt more at home with Spanish speaking people. Business prospered. Those were good days. However, in 1917 Tony sold his business. Prohibition developed. And once more he moved his family across the street from his saloon to the high ceilinged frame building owned by Mr. Callender. In 1918, Tony bought the property for $3,000. To this grocery and meat market, he added feed, shovels, "Blue Jeans", and miner's lanterns. These were the ones used in the days of the "Gay Nineties" when the White Ash Mine exploded, killing 23 miners. Underneath the road from Madrid to Cerrillos, was an old abandoned coal mine called the "White Ash". For 40 years, the ground sizzled and steamed. On a cold winter night, it was an eerie sight.

 

Meanwhile, Tony's family grew: Charley was born in 1918, Edith in 1922, and Corina in 1928. He periodically bought buildings on both sides of the original store. At the back was a winery where he made some of the best tasting red wines for years. Grapes were shipped from California. He had to have a special stamp from Denver to make wine, but was not allowed to sell it.

 

Many were hard hit by the Depression. Jobs were hard to find. In the 20's, Tony lost several hundred dollars in a a bank failure. He lost his trust in banks. He went from one challenge to another. But his true love never left him: coal mining. He worked around the Omero Mine for 40 years. In 1940, Tony took out his citizenship papers. In 1941, he bought the Omero Mine from the New York owner. His boys all went to work in the mine.

 

Every year the Simoni family went to Albuquerque for supplies. In September, 1936, they went as usual. On the way home they had a wreck. The car ahead made a turn without warning. Rosina was injured. Just before Christmas she died without having that long awaited trip back to Italy. Rosina was a beautiful lady whose life in her adopted country was devoted completely to her husband and children.

 

World War II came and at the Omero Mine, Johnny was the last of the Simoni boys to go into the service in the Air Corps. Johnny returned. Freddy was captured, survived the Bataan Death March only to die later in a prison camp. Charley was killed in action in the Philippines.

 

At the mine, Tony worked harder than ever. He dug a well, hit water and built a reservoir. He always said "More will happen in Cerrillos" and the rumors of gas discoveries were always around. Tony semi-retired but still loved his garden and chickens. In 1948, he leased the mine. He had his first stroke in 1954 and a fatal one in 1956.

 

Tony had many friends. During the Depression he always helped those in need and during the war, shared his stamps, so difficult to obtain. He was an integral part of Cerrillos, remembered by many. As we close the door of the past, the trip back to 1877 leaves a vivid and lingering feeling of admiration for that spunky little Italian who dared to live the life he chose by making his dreams come true.

Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsma571910sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN ['0161 'tZ .ioqtnejdos 'iCEpjnjus ROD, GUN AND KENNEL CONDUCTED BY J. X. D»WITT.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

CARELESSNESS RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS. Since the open deer season, in this State, has pre- vailed, several fatalities and injuries, due to care- lessness with firearms, have heen reported. Now that the fall shooting will soon be on, what the aggregate list will be when the seasons are over is a matter of some conjecture. A careless, or excited, man and a loaded firearm comprise a deadly combination, and probably no amount of preaching will serve to rem- edy the situation. In this respect, however, we offer some hints from an old hunter, who has compiled a few "dont's" for those who go out to slay or be slain. These sugges- tions may not be new to many, but they are season- able: Don't grasp a gun by the barrel and drag it after you out of a boat, through a fence, or anywhere else; unless you want to test the truth of the saying that a man has more lives than a cat—and then don't. One discharge may blow them all out. Don't carry more than a small quantity of whisky with you on your hunt. It's poor stuff to shoot on, and the devil who engineers the "deplorable acci- dents" you read of frequently while the hunting sea- son is on has no more potent ally than the product of the still. Don't under any circumstances allow your gun muz- zle to point for one single instant at any living thing you do not mean to kill. Don't allow yourself to carry a cocked gun in your hands, not even if you are alone. A sudden stumble may fire it, and you can never tell where the contents may go. Don't carry a loaded gun into your camp or stop- ping place. And be absolutely sure that every cart- ridge is taken out of it before you go near the door. If the sportsman who shot poor Jones through the heart across his own camp table had heeded that don't and the other regarding the muzzle of the gun pointing at any one, Jones would have been alive today. You see, he took a hammerless rifle into Jones' camp and laid it down on the table on the other side of which his host was sitting, talked for a while, picked up his rifle—and killed Jones in- stantly. He has never been able to understand how. Don't shoot at a noise. Don't shoot at a moving bush. If, the other day, the sportsman who stood in Smith's backyard and killed his chum who was com- ing through the high brush SO rods away, had heeded these dont's the luckless chum wouldn't have been hurled into eternity without a moment's warning, and the still more luckless survivor would not today be a helpless maniac. These are dont's worth heed- ing. Don't shoot at small game such as rabbits, quail or squirrels with big ammunition. The man who shot at a rabbit with a high-power rifle last season and killed a woodchopper half a mile distant has wished many times since that he had heeded that don't. Don't go away from your camp before you have fa- miliarized yourself with the lay of the land and the landmarks within at least a radius of half a mile. Don't go out without a good supply of matches, part of them in a waterproof case as an emergency supply; a good, heavy, hunting knife, a well-ground hunting ax or hatchet, a pocket compass and a lunch. There is always such a thing as getting lost among the possibilities. Don't lose your head if you do lose your bearings; that is if you get lost. Sit down, take a smoke, get ycur mind out of the first panic into which the fact that you don't know where you are is sure to throw it, and as soon as it is in normal working order way back. If you could do that you would not have don't make a fool of yourself in trying to find your got lost in the first place. Don't give yourself up for lost, however. Get busy. Gather a heap of wood in case you have to camp out all night. Make a fire. 8hen sit down and wait for the guide or your comrade to find you. That's what they are sure to be trying to do, so don't make it harder for him by getting away from him as rapidly as panic speed can effect it. A good thing to do is to keep on top of the ridges. Don't shoot at running game or any other unless you can clearly see three things—the game, the front sight of your gun and the rear ditto, and all three in conjunction, mind. Don't jerk the trigger when you do see these three things in conjunction; press it. Then you won't throw the gun barrel up the least trifle when you fire; the veriest trifle elevation at that moment spoils the shot. And lastly: Don't forget a single one of these dont's. Don't forget to observe them so rigidly that their observance becomes a second nature to you. Don't forget to preach the like observance to your fellow sportsmen, and you will find them the best pieces of wood lore you ever learned. THE ALEUTIAN HUNTER TAKES RISKS. Unalaska, westward of the Aleutian chain of islands, and Kadiak, just south of the great Alaskan peninsula, were the two main points whence radiated the hunting flotillas for the sea otter grounds. For- merly a single Russian schooner or packet boat would lead the way with a procession of a thousand bi- darkas. Later schooners, 30 or 40 of them, gathered the hunters at some main fur post, stowed the light skin canoes in piles on the decks and carried the Aleuts to the otter grounds. This might be at Adka, where the finest otter hunters in the world lived, or on the south shore of Unalaska, or in Cook inlet, where the rip of the tide runs a mill race, or just off Kadiak on the south coast, where 20 miles of beach bowlders and surf waters and little islets of sea kelp provide ideal fields for the sea otter. Here the sweep- ing tides and booming backwash keep up such a roar of tumbling seas that the shy, wary otter, alert as an eagle, does not easily get scent or sound of human intruder. Surf washes out the scent of the man track. Surf outsounds noise of the man killer, and no fires are lighted, be it winter or summer, unless the wind is straight from the southward, for the sea otter always frequents the south shores. The only provisions on the carrying schooner are hams, ran- cid butter or grease, some rye bread and flour; the only clothing what the Aleut hunters wear. No sooner has the schooner sheered off the hunt- ing grounds than the Aleuts are over decks with the agility of performing monkeys, the schooner captain wishing each good luck, the eager hunters leaping into their bidarkas following the lead of a chief. The schooner then returns to the home harbor, leaving the hunters on islands as bare as a planed board for two, three, four months. Upon the Commander group otter hunters are now restricted to the use of the net alone, but formerly the nature of the hunting was determined entirely by the weather. If a tide ran with heavy surf and wind landward to conceal sound and sight the hunters lined along shore of the kelp beds and engaged in the hunt known as surf shooting. Their rifles would carry 1000 yards. Who- ever saw the little round black head bob above the surface of the water shot, and the surf wash carried in the dead body. If the weather was dead calm, fog or clear, bands of 20 or 30 men deployed in a circle to spear their quarry. This was the spearing surround. Or if such a hurricane gale was churning the sea that gusty spray and sleet storm washed out every outline, sweeping the kelp beds naked one minute, inundat- ing them with mountainous rollers that thundered up the rocks the next, the Aleut hunters risked life, scud- ded out on the back of the raging storm, now riding the rollers, now dipping to the trough of the sea, now scooting with lightning paddle strokes right through the blasts of spray athwart wave wash and trough, straight for the kelp beds or rocky bowlders, where the sea ottter must have been driven for refuge by the storm. This hunting is the very incarnation of the storm spirit itself, for the wilder the gale the more sea otters have come ashore, the less likely they will be to see or hear or smell the hunter. Gafl or paddle in hand, the Aleut leaps from rock to rock or dashes among the tumbling beds of tossed kelp. A quick blow of the bludgeon—the otter never knows how death came. This is the club hunt. But where the shore is honeycombed with caves and narrow inlets of kelp fields there is a safer kind of hunting. Huge nets, now made of twine, formerly of sinew, with wooden floaters above, iron sinkers below, are spread athwart the kelp gelds. The tide sweeps in, washing the net flat. And the sea otter swims in with the tide. The tide sweeps out, washing the net up, but the otters are enmeshed in a tangle that holds neck and feet. This is perhaps the best kind of otter hunting, for the females and young can be thrown back in the sea. No landsman's still hunt affords the thrilling ex- citement of the otter hunter's spearing surrounds. Fifteen or 25 little skin skiffs, with two or three men in each, paddle out under a chief elected by common consent. Whether fog or clear, the spearing is done only in calm weather. The long line of bidarkas circles silently over the silver sea. Not a word is spoken, not a paddle blade allowed to click against the bone gunwales of the skiff. Double-bladed paddles are frequently used, so shift of paddle is made from side to side of the canoes without a change of hands. The skin bidarkas take to the water as noiselessly as the glide of a duck. Yonder, where the bowlders lie mile on mile awash in the surf kelp ratfs—forest of seaweed—lift and fall with the rhythmic wash of the tide. Hither the other hunters steer, silent as shadows. Then when the proper ground is reached the boats spread out in one large or several smaller circles. When the quarry is located the surround closes in with shouts and the luckless otter is too confused to select a break in the ranks of the spearmen. But a few seconds elapse before a hurthing spear is sent unerringly in its direction. For provisions the Aleut his brought very little from the ship. He will depend on the winds driving in a dead whale or on the fish of the shore or on the eggs of the sea birds that nest on these rocks millions upon millions, such myriads of birds they seem to crowd each other for foot room, and the noise of their wings is like a great wind. He himself is what any race of men would become in generations of such a life. His skin is more like bronze than leather. His chest is like a bellows, but his legs are ill developed from the cramped posture of knees in the manhole. o WHY WE TAKE TO THE WOODS. The general run of people are nowadays coming to realize that the success of a hunting party is not to be judged entirely by the amount of game killed. A few years back the inevitable question asked of a man returning from the woods was: "How many deer did you kill?" Now, it more frequently it: "Did you have a good time?" A man doesn't go through hardships innumerable and spend a month's salary just to get a few score pounds of meat. He can buy his meat at home. He goes into the woods not merely to kill, but to get some enjoyment out of life, and that enjoyment comes whether he kills anything or not. There is fun in the chase, but the average sportsman feels that his time has been well invested whether he gets a shot at game or not. There is nothing like a week or two in the pine forests to •tone a man up and give him an appetite for food and sleep. It offers a complete change and relaxation and is worth whatever price is paid for it. Such a trip will do more for a man than any amount of money spent in doctor's bills. Of course, there are some tenderfeet who catch bad colds and have an unpleasant time on hunting trips, but this just shows that a little more forest life is just what they need. If they lived long enough in the woods and moun- tains they would get over their tenderness alto- gether. Such a life toughens a man up in good shape and puts him in a position where he can sit around all day with feet thoroughly soaked, and not feel the slightest of ill-effects. There must of necessity be some attraction in the way of deer and moose or other big game, to draw men into the wilds, and it will be a shame and a blow to the health of the na- tion when the hunting is a thing of the past, for then the outdoor life of the average city man will be con- fined to summer resorts, and life at such a place gen- erally is as much or more of a drag on a person's health than the bustle of the city. There isn't such a chance there for complete rest. Fishing is also a mighty good thing because of the way it gets men into the wilderness, but it isn't to be compared with hunting in this respect, for it takes comparatively few away from sivilization entirely, the way hunting does. The fishing resorts, too, commonly have good hotel accommodations, and all that sort of thing. SAN FRANCISCO FLY-CASTING CLUB. Saturday Contest No. 10. September 17, 1910. Wind, Judges, L. G. Burpee, F. H Clerk, E. O. Ritter. 1 2 Medal Series, Stow Lake, southwest. "Weather, fair. Reed, E. A. Mocker. F. A. Webster . . Geo. C. Edwards T. C. Kierulff . . . L. G. Burpee . . . E. A. Mocker ... F. H. Reed F. J. Cooper . . . Re-Entry— A. Webster .. 99.2 98.10 99.4 97.12 98.3 97.6 n 98.52 9S.36 99.32 96.36 98.8 98.18 3 b 99.10 99.20 100 97.20 98.40 98.40 19.1 IS.5S 96.5S 9S.24 98.44 F. L. G. Burpee E. A. Mocker C. Kierulff. Geo. F. H. C. Edwards. Reed 99.5 9S.10 97.7 97.8 97.14 9S.13 98.13 97.2 99.8 99.36 96.20 97.40 97.12 97.4 98.40 97.32 99.4 9S.52 99.20 99.40 97 9S.10 99.50 99.20 100 99.40 99.40 99.20 99.14 99.38 96.40 97.55 98.31 98.12 99.20 98.36 99.22 99.6 91.2 97.2 98.4 100 106 96.6 88.5 83.2 87 87.3 120 109 95.1 66.9 103 127 149 97 124 F. J. Cooper 87.2 108 Sunday Contest No. 10. Medal Series. Stow Lake, September 18, 1910. Wind, southwest. Weather, cloudy. Judges. T. C. Kierulff, H. B. Sperry, J. B. Kenniff. Clerk, E. O. Ritter. 12 3 4 5 a b H. F. T. C. F. F. Dr. Sperry Cooper Kierulff Kewell . . . Haight Reed E. Brooks. E. A. Mocker James Watt J. B. Kenniff Re-Entry— F. H. Reed Dr. W. E. Brooks. F. J. Cooper J. B. Kenniff . ... 98.11 96.3 98.13 98.13 98.3 97.14 98.8 97.5 96.6 98.13 98.2S 99.20 9S.54 98.36 100 99.18 9S.32 99.20 98.56 96.56 96.40 96.48 98.24 99.20 9S.52 98.8 99.20 98.44 97.56 99.20 9S.3S 96.36 99 97.4S 97.40 100 98.50 93.2 81 95.1 127 96.8 132 94 109 85.6 91.8 105 97.8 115 97.2 117 99 170 James Watt F. J. Cooper NOTE:: Event 1- Accuracy casting. 97.12198.56199.20 97.13 " 98.5 99 97.10 99.2 97 9S.16 9S.28 98.16 98.8 97.8 8.40 99. S 97.50 99.40 ! 30 I .20 I 99.40 i 98.20 ! 157 Distance casting, feet. Event 2— percentage. Event 3—Delicacy 98.59 48 98.54 97.44 91 91.7 93.6 98.2 90.3 .10.1 90.1 111 136 148 151 160 155 casting; a, accuracy percentage: b, delicacy percent- age; e, net percentage. Event 4^Lure casting. Event Z—Long distance lure casting, average. Fractions in Event 2, fifteenths; in Event 3, six- tieths; in lure casting, tenths. Booth, the Los Angeles crack on taxidermy, says that the deer season down south should not open until September 15. The deer have not got their full coat of hair until that time, and the meat Is not fit to eat till late in the summer. There is some talk of changing the game laws of this section so the season will open the middle of September, as it would benefit the game as well as the hunter.

  

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2004. Fidalgo Bay.

Rail to Trail conversion. This former Burlington Northern railway was paved and opened to the public in 2005. It is named after the late Tommy Thompson, a narrow gauge railway creator who dreamed of running his train along the Fidalgo Island shoreline.

 

Custom Plywood Mill Site

The site is currently vacant property with abandoned building remnants and debris. A sawmill and wood-box factory, and then a plywood mill, operated on the site for almost a century. Mill features included a hog-fuel boiler, drum storage tank area, transformer yard, above-ground storage tanks containing fuel oil, gasoline, diesel and/or propane, phenolic formaldehyde resin and caustic storage tanks (both used in making plywood glue), a machine shop, a metal shop, and an area for spraying paint and oil.

 

fortress.wa.gov/ecy/gsp/Sitepage.aspx?csid=4533

 

Work will focus on cleaning up about 6 upland acres this year. It will include removing pilings and other structures to allow excavation of about 33,600 tons of contaminated soil; off-site disposal of the soil, structures and pilings; and backfilling the site with about 39,000 tons of clean soil.

Site soil contains elevated concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, zinc, oil-range petroleum hydrocarbons, dioxins, and furans. Groundwater beneath the site does not meet drinking water standards. The water also contains elevated concentrations of arsenic, copper and nickel. Dioxins and wood debris contaminate Marine sediments are found to be contaminated with dioxins and wood debris.

In 2013, Ecology plans to:

Remove old creosote dock pilings and other in-water concrete and metal structures.

Dig up and dredge about 10 acres of sediment contaminated with dioxins and wood waste.

Dispose of contaminated sediment off-site.

Improve the near-shore habitat by reshaping an existing spit and jetty.

Connect Fidalgo Bay with the wetland area that was created in 2011.

Alaskan Black Cod, BBQ Pork Belly & Squash Dumpling in a Matsutake Mushroom Broth

 

Wine pairing: Sandhill "Small Lots" Viognier, British Columbia

My section was the American team or "Spruce Mill Camp"

Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsma361900sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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June 16, 1900J fcij* gtreifrnr mtf* gftrart*m<m 381 CARTRIDGE AND SHBLL. A live bird shoot at tbe Canvasback Shooting Clab ground8 np on tbe Suisun marsh is one of the coming events that will be thoroughly enjoyed by those participating—and the bear will dance. The Board of Supervisors of San Joaquin county have passed an ordinance shortening the open season one month for male deer in that county—the seasons opens August 15th and closes October 15th. Four beautiful engraved silver caps are displayed in the show window of a market street jeweler. These prizes will be distributed among the four high guns of the California Wing Club at tbe end of the present live bird season. Deer hunters have now but three weeks to wait for the opeoing day of the season, which commences on Sunday, July 15th. From many localities comes the cheering news that deer are plentiful. Sportsmen who favor dove shooting will find the toothsome and swift flying bird numerous in many districts, the open season for doves commences also on Jnly 15th. A scbedual of county laws governing the open season for doves and deer will be found in another column. Orange—Aug. 15 to Oct. 1. Riverside—Season closed until July 15,1901. Sail Benito—Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. San Joaquiu—Aug. 15 to Oct 15. Sao Luib ObiBpo—July 15 to Sept. 1. Use of dogB prohibited. San Mateo—Aug. 15 to Sept. 15. Sauta Barbara—Aug. 1 to Aug. 15. Use of doga prohibited. Santa Clara—Aug. 16 to Oct. 15. Shasta—July 15 to Oct 1. Sierra—Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. 8onoma—Jnly 15 to Oct. 1. Sntter—Sept. 1 to Ootober 15. Trinity-Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. Tulare—Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. Venlora—Oct. 10 to Oct. 15. The open season for dove shooting under the State law com- mences July 15th and end-; on February 15th following. The changes made by county boards of supervisors in the dura- tion of tthe open season are as follows : Butte-Aug. l to Feb. 15. El Dorado-July 20 to Feb. 1. Fresno—Aug. 15 to Feb 15. KingB—Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Los Angeles—July 15 to Oct. 1. Orange—Aug. I to Feb. 1. Sutter—July 15 to Jan. 1. Yolo—Sept. 1 to Jan 31. A. B. Hwartout and B. Bruck, of St. Helens, representing 250 members of the Game Protective Association up the vallev, appeared before tbe Supervisors of Napa county, on the 13th irst., and asked the Board to appoint a game warden for Napa county. Mr. Bruck stated that tbe people in his locality wanted Mr. 8wartout appointed to the place, and also said that the deer law was being violated near St. Helena. The matter was continued until the July meeting of the Board. A quail's nest was broken up during haying operations on a ranch near Pengrove, Sonoma county, recently. Mr. Himebaach, the rancher, picked up a number of the un- broken eggs, and taking them to the house, placed them in an incubator containing several hundred hen eggs in the process of hatching. The quail eggs were almost forgotten until recently, when seven voung quail made their appear- ance in the incubator. The little quail chicks are lively and healthy, and are able to feed themselves without trouble. A rifle barrel held in a vise will not shoot accurately. Tbe passage of a bullet through the bore expands the barrel, which is, to a certain degree, elastic. The expansion and return to normal status are in undulating curves. Tbe pressure of the vise interrupts the curves, chokes the barrel at tbe point of pressure and probably deforms the bullet in its cross-section. To test a rifle, rest the barrel near the muzzle upon a bag filled with sand. The spring of the barrel from the rest will cause it to shoot one point higher than when held off-hand, an error that all riflemen understand. One phase of game protection in England is exemplified by the following case: At Woodbridge Petty Sessions, Arthur Jacobs, a Sutton youth, aged fourteen, was charged with unlawfully taking sevtn partridge's eggs from a nest by the roadside, at Sutton, on April 29.b. John Green, farm steward to to Mr. Waller's Exors., prosecuted. George Cloulen, laborer, proved the case, saying that he was going along the road with defendant, when they saw a nest with seven eggs in. Defendant sucked five of them, and handed two to another boy. Prosecutor did not wish to press tbe case, and the bench fined defendant, whom the chairman called a "Billy bov," 6d an egg, witb costs 12s. Many articles have appeared in Eastern sportsmen's journals concerning spring shooting, a subject we fare sorry to say that was almost entirely overlooked by the recent game convention in this city. The matter is an important one regardiog game protection and will ere long force itself upon tbe serious attention of Coast sportsmen and others interested in saving game from a too rapid extermination. Migratory game birds—among which the chief sufferers from spring shooting have been duck and snipe—cannot be said to be the property of any one State, as mav be affirmed of quail and grouse and others, says June Outing. There- fore a law should be enacted by Congress prohibiting spring shooting in every State and Territory of the United States. Surely the situation is sufficiently serious to warrant national legislation, for there can be no doubt that unless spring shooting is abandoned absolutely, tbe day is not far distant when ducks will become as scarce as wild pigeoo. The various State laws touching spring shooting are in the majority of cases entirely insufficient, and in the case of the most important Eastern States are distinctly bad. For example, Maine, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania permit spring shooting up to May 1st. The very States in which we should naturally expect tbe most enlightenment, exhibit the least. This is due, of course, to the preponderance on the game commissions of tbe politician, who has more interest in bis friends, the pot- hunters and dealers, than in the survival of bird life. Here in New York, with Governor Roosevelt and his recentlv ap- pointed commission in office, we confidently expect spring shooting to be soon forbidden. Indiana, Ohio, Iowa, Massachusetts and Maryland show some slieht improvement, their close season beginning April 15th. Virginia, Missouri, Kentuckv, Utah, North Carolina and the District of Column r prohibit shooting from April 1st, and are therefore a bit better. Florida and California. with March 1st, and Texa?, with March 15th as tbe begin- ning of the close seasoe, are a further improvement. Open Season for Deer and Doves. The following is a synopsis of the county laws defining the open seasons for hunting bucks and shooting doves. The State law prescribes the open season for male deer only com- mencing on July 15th and ending October 15th. The changes from the statutory season on deer are as follows: Alpine—Sept. 2 to Oct. 15. Alameda—July 15 to Oct. 1. Colusa—Aug. 15 to Oct. 15. Calaveras—flept. 1 to Oct. 15. The use of dogs prohibited. Contra Costa—July 20 to Sept. 2. Hamboldt—UBe of dogs prohibited. Lake-Aug. l to Oct. 1. Lo« Angeles—Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Marin—Jnly 15 to Sept. 16. Monterey—July 15 to Sept. 1. UBe of dogs prohibited. 7. Hach person,companyorcorporation taking salmon In Alaskan waters shall establish and condnct, at or near the fisheries operated by him or them, a suitable artificial propagating plant or hatchery; and 9ba.ll produce yearly and place Id the natural spawning waters or each fishery so operated red salmon fr/ in such numbers as shall be equal to at least tour times the number of the mature fish taken from the said fisheries, by or for him or them, during the preceding iNhDR gcasoD. The management and operation of socn hatcheries snail be subject to such rules and regulations as may hereafter be prescribed by the: Secretary of the Treasury. They Bhall be open to luspvetlou by the authorized oflicial of this department. Annual reports Bhall be made givliig lull particulars cf the number of male and lemale salmon stripped, the number of eggs treated, the number and percentage of fish hatched and all other conditions of intereBt: and there shall be made a sworn yearly statement of the number of fry planted and the exact location where said planting was done Answers to Correspondents. Editor Breeder and Sportsman—Under American Association Rales, a shooter fires first, barrel at a live bird and knocks him down. He opens bis gnn (but does not leave the score) and then closes It and fires his second barrel, killing the bird. How should it be scored? A Subscribes. The Association rules make no reference to the act of open- ing or breaking the gun at the score. The inference would be that the shooter was through and in effect such action is practically the same as leaving the score. Some sportsmen of experience claim that the opening of the gun after firing one barrel and before the shooter leaves tbe score does not abridge his right to use the second barrel, if necessary, as tbe shooter is entitled to the use of both barrels and the opening of the gun during the interval between firing the first and second barrel is of no particular importance as conflicting witb tbe rules of live bird shooting. The construction will hardly apply, except in cases where the local club counten- ances such practice. The shooter should remain at tbe score with his gun ready to use the second barrel, if required, until the bird is retrieved and the referee announces the result If the bird was strong enough to need a second barrel the shooter would properly be in position to fire without any chance of having the result challenged. During the Grand American Handicap, the Interstate and other important live bird events in the East, a shooter who opens his gun is not allowed to use the second barrel, the fact of bis not leaving the score is not taken into consideration, his action is construed as evidence that he is through shoot- ing for that round. If he willingly on an uncalled for technicality surrenders his right to use the second barrel by such action that is his loss This unwritten law of the traps for live bird Bhooting also prevails on the Association grounds at Ingleside. There being no reason for a shooter to open his gun before leaving the score, if be fails to kill with the first barrel ard then uses the second after having opened his gun, the bird ie scored a lost bird. In reference to the above query we are inclined to say that the bird should be scored "lost."

 

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Coming Events. Juoe 23—Fly-CaBtlng. Saturday content No. 8, class series, Stow Like, 2:30 P. M. June 24-Fly-Casting. 8nnday conteBt No. 8, class series, Stow Lake, 1" p m July U-Aug. 4-Chicago Fly-Casting Club's medal conteBt, North Lagoon, Garfield Park. Regular practice days: May 19, June 2.16 and 30, July 28 and August 11. Aug. 17, 18—Open-to-tbe-World Casting Tournament, under the auspices of the Chicago Fly-Casting Club, North Lagoon, Garfield Park, Chicago. Alaska Fisheries to be Protected. Secretary Gage has prepared the following set of regula- tions for tbe protection of the salmon fisheries of Alaska, as author'z d lo dc by the act of March 3, 1899, providing a code of criminal procedure for the district of Alaska. The regulations are as follows : 1. The provif-iona of this actare applicable to all territorial waters of Alaska, including tide waters, lagoons, bays, coves, straits, bayous, rivers. Btreams and the beach approaches to the same. 2 Traps, whether "fixed orBiationary obstructions" (built of piles and webbine). or constructed of webbing and floats and Busceptlble of removal from place lo place, are declaied to be obstructions which "impede the ascent of salmon to their spawning grounds," and their use Ib hereby forbidden. Provided that this regulation shall lake effect and be In lorce on nud after January 1, 1901, except as provided in Chapter 12, Section 1L0, of the act of Mar'h 3, 1?90. 8. It is forbidden to lay any Felne, gill or o'her net within 1C0 yards of the month on either tide, tor immediately abreast of the mouth of any river or stream whereby in the felling or hauling of the said Beine, gill or otbernet it may drift wholly or partially across and operate to close the mouth of said river or stream. 4. The wanton destruction of Balmon is declared to be unlawful. Whoever is guilty thereof is hereby declared to be subject to the penalties provided lor specific violations of the act referred to. 5. All persnna. companies or corporations engaged In Balmon packing, salting or smoking in the district of Alaska shall make de- tailed annual reports of such business, upon forms furnished by this department, to the agent of the Treasury for tbe protection of the sal- mon fisheries, covering all such facts as may be required for tbe in- formation of tbe department. Such reports shall be Bworn to by the superintendent, manager or other person having knowledge of the facts, a separate blank form being used for each establishment In cases where more than one cannery or saltery 1= conducted by a per- son, company or coiporalion; and the same Bhall be flied with tbo sn(d agent at the close of the fishing season, and not later than November lBt. 6. During the period of Inspection of the salmon fisheries by the special agent of this department (he person In cbaree of each fishery visited shall furnish tbe said agent with such Information regarding the run of fish, tbe pack secured, thh probable results of tbe season's work and Buch other facts as may be required to afford him a basis for an Intelligent preliminary report of the year's business and the state of the fisheries. 8triped bass anglers are having much sport in many localities at present. Every day and night the estuary in the vicinity of the Oakland cotton mill is crowded with boats containing Btnped bass fishermen. Numerous fish are caught, the aver- age weight being under five pounds, larger fish, some weigh- ing as much as twenty pounds, are also caught from time to time. Among those who have made catches across the bay are Chas. Briedeostein, Jaa. Pariser, Al Wilson, W. R. Mc- Farland, "Doc" Watt, "Doc" Cox, "Sugarhouse," E. E. Daverkosen, JaB. S. Turner, Dr. Levison, Bosawell Kenniff and many others. In the small sloughs near Alviso striped bass have been caught in generous quantity and of good size. A fish weighing sixty pounds is reported to have been caught near the mouth of the Salinas river recently. The Bassio Club made Pete Walsh's ark near Black Point their base of operations last Sunday. This being their first excursion in quest of the gay and festive bass they conducted their campaign from the hurricane deck of the Petalnma creek bridge. Eight nice sized fish were caught and placed in the baskets to tbe delight and surprise of the anglers. Jules Bruns likes the game, he says a rod should have a pistol grip on the butt to make it work properly. Minstrel Karney will train his dog Major McCorker to retrieve tbe fish, he says "jabbing a fish with a three jointed gaff is an unsportsmanlike way of gathering a dead bird." Reports from Petaluma creek indicate that striped bass are numerous in that and adjacent waters. A thirty pound fish was caught by Capt. Walker near Lakeville last Sunday. Ten members of the Petaluma Gun Club fishing near the club house on the creek last Snnday caught 121 fish, averag- ing from two to five pounds in weight. The Sundry before 98 fish were caught at the same place. Trolling for these fish with only a clam on the hook for a lure has been a very successful method of getting a strike. The boat Bhonld not have much speed however. A good story is told of two knights of the rod who recently journeyed to Pilarcitos lake for a day's fishing. The start was made from this city on a Saturday evening in a vehicle drawn by a horse whose daily routine of usefulness is served on a butter and egg delivery route. The long trip down the country road waa not to the nag's liking so it wsb a case of balk at every hill. Going over tbe mountains was so much different from stopping to deliver a roll of butter or dozen eggs every half block that the horse went on strike and our two fishermen, the plumber and the egg merchant, were compelled to jump out and put their shoulders to the wagon to force the plug along. They arrived at their destination late in the morning tired but not discouraged. On tbe road back home, the tactics were reversed, the plumber walked two thirds of the way home actually pulling the unwilling horse along by the bridle. This was all the more enjoyable be- cause all the other fishermen at the lake were aware of their predicament and they had much pleasant advioe to offer as they paBEed the toilers on their weary way to the city. Our anglers have agreed that the wagon is all right, but it needs a new horse for a fishing trip. Recent reports from Sims are gladdening to the heart of tbe angler. The fishing conditions have been steadily im- proving. Fishermen at that point now are daily making good catches of nice sized tiout. The season at Sims was somewhat late as anglers on the river (here found out three weeks ago, only energetic and persistent work brought results Tbe stream was full of the larvae of tbe caddis fiv and the fish only took the fly grudgingly. The "Caddis fly" waB about the best killing lure and that after six o'clock in the evening. Conditions now are decidedly more favorable to the angler, the morning and evening fishing is of a nature to make tbe fisherman happy for the time being. The royal coachman, professor and gray hackle are giving way now to the brown hackles, cowdung and magpie flies. T. C. Wisel was arraigned befnre Justice Wallace, of San Jose, on the 11th inst. on a charge of violating the fish and game law. He was charged with having caught trout on the headwaters of Agate creek before April 1st. He pleaded not guilty and was released npon bail in tbe sum of $100. His trial has been set for June 27tb, at 10 A. >t Shasta Springe on the upper Sacramento is mother Mecca just now for the rod wielder. At the upper soda spring plenty of one and one and a half pound fish have been caught duriog the past week. The blue dun and whirling dun on No. 10 books are the best flies, fishing is at its flood after four o'clock in the afternoon. "Doc" Watt arrived in town last Monday morning with a happy smile and a No. 3 creel filled with a nice mess rf brook trout he caught in Boulder creek. It took him just two hours to walk from the ferry to Montgomery street, everybody eaw the fish. A shipment of American black bass was made to France and they have flourished so marvelouely that they are com- mon articles of diet in the hotels and restaurants. When the bass were introduced the French streams were practically deserted. Those who claim to know tbt stream seem to believe (bat tbe Truckee season will commence a month later this year and that good fishing will not be in order until ft

  

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Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsma371900sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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10 %fyt &vee£iev mt& §p&vt#mtztr^ IDecembee 1. 190q

 

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Oominff Events. BENCH BHOW3. Nov. 28, 29, 30. Dec. 1.—Philadelphia Dog Show Ass'n. Second annual show. Philadelphia, Pa. M. A. Viti, Secretary. Dec 5, 6, 7, 8—Oakland Show. (P. K. L. Boles). N. J. Stewart Aromas, Monterey Co. Dec 6. 7, 8, 9,10—Cincinnati Fox Terrier Club. Annual enow. Cincinnati. O. J. C. Frohliger, Secretary. Feb. 26, 27, 23, March 1—Cleveland Kennel Club. Annual bench show. C. M. Munball, Secreta-y, Cleveland, O. Jan. 1. 2, 3, 4—Louisiana Kennel Club. Bench show. Xew Orleans, Law, A. E. Shaw, Secretary. March 5. 7, S, 9—Duguesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburg, Pa. Fred'fc S. Stedman. Secretary. FIELD TRIALS. Xov. 27—Kentucky Field Trial Club. Annual trials. Glasgow, Ky. F W. Samuel, Secretary. Nov. 30—Continental Field Trial Club. Sixth annual trials. New- ton. N. C. Members'State. Nov. 30. Derby, Dec. 3. Theo. Sturgess, Secretary-treasurer, Greenfield Hill. Conn. Dec JO—Missouri Field Trials Association. Fourth annual trials. Paris, Mo. L. S. Eddins, Secretary, Sedalia, Mo. Jan. 14—Pacific Coast Field Trial Club. Eighteenth annual trials.1 Coronado, Cal. Albert Betz, Secretary, San Francisco, Cal. Jan. 14—Alabama Field Trials Club. Fifth annual trials Greenville, Alabama, J. B- Rosenstihl, Secretary. Jan. 21—United States Field Trial Club. Tenth annual trials Benton county. Miss. W. B. Stafford Secretary. Trenton, Tenn. Feb. Championship Field Trial Association. Annual trials, (First week in Feb). Grand Junction, Tenn. W. B. Stafiord, Secre- tary. Oakland Show Notes. The entries for the Oakland bench show closed on the 25th inst. with, we were informed by the President of the Leagae, a list of 155 dogs and 183 entries. This entry, it is expected, will be raised enough to reach the 200 mark or over when the northern entries are added. In the received entries Collies lead with forty dogs listed and sixty entries'. Cockers come next with twenty-eight dogs and twenty-nine entries. As we go to press a day earlier this week we are un- able to give the fall list of entries, etc., promised by the Sec- retary, Mr. Norman J. Stewart. We learn that the St. Bernard beeches will not include an exhibit by the Golden Gate Kennels. This is to be regretted it is reported that Le King is in grand shape and would without doubt settle the question of Ms great superiority over the smooth coat which he beat in winners' at Tanforan and which award earned the appearance of a job lot of viru- lent rnbbish from a pen noted for its pettifogging distortion of facts and truth. We are here prompted to express some little surprise that the attacks and criticisms on Le King were given so much attention as to influence the owner of Golden Gate St. Ber- nard Kennels to withhold his nsnal entries from the Oakland Show, If his dog and kennels are of the merit he believes they are, and this is conceded by the majority of us, here was the fancier's supreme opportunity to establish his claims and refute biased criticism in a sportsmanlike way. This is one of the numerous instances where gentlemen fanciers have withdrawn, evinced tbe'r disgust and lost in- terest in kennel affairs, not however becaise of the reason or force of the mildewed inkpots spilled against them. Asso- ciation and contact in the fancy that unfortunately harbored so nauseous an element was to be avoided. The specials for the best Bull Terrier, to be judged solely on fighting qualities, was not given to encourage "balls and terriers" bat to try and discover if, in the opinion of men who in days gone by had fought dogs, our judges were judging by the standard of the Boll Terrier Club (which is the type of a perfect fighting Bull Terrier) or by a standard of their own. No entries have been received by "business" Bull Terrier men, all the entries being from well known fanciers. The specials were not put up as a cheap bid for the aid of the "business" class of dog men. It was done to prove that our jadges were right and to refute (be old argu- ment. The attempt to show that the Ball Terrier is not a fighting dog which American Stock-Keeper makes is a vain one. There is no fighting dog man who wants a more per- fect dog than the standard gives him; the trouble, it has been claimed, is that judges apparently do not study the Btandard as closely as they do the tyre of dog which is "popularly supposed" to be a tvpical Bull Terrier. If the specials offered are not in accord with the sentiments of the Pacific Ball Terrier Club, or that they in any way hurt or discredit the breed they will be withdrawn. The Ear of the Dog. In an article on "Practical Observations on the Human Ear and its Diseases:" by 8amuel 8exton, M. D., which ap- pears in the Medical Record, the following description of the ear of the dog is given : If attention be directed to the ears of aerial animals below man in the scale, it will be fouod on comparison that there exists a striking resemblance, although a very marked differ- ence prevails in the relative siza of the external muBclea, tho9eof the former being more folly developed. In man, owing to long disuse, they are comparatively rudimentsry and useless, since he cannot employ them to move his ears in the same degree enjoyed by such animals, for example, as the horse and dog. In these animals the auricle is loosely attached to the head, and may therefore be more effectively employed in gathering sound in the act of listening, sicce the largely developoped aural muscles can be brought into liie in presenting tbe concavity of the ear in diferent direc- t 008. Having discovered the source of sound, tbe concave urface of tbe auricle may, on observing the aDimal, be seen • beoflered to it and kept in a more erect state—a position probably most favorable for the collection of sound. In the dog the entire scalp glides freely over the skull, thus facilita- ting the voluntary movements of the ear. Another opportunity was offered the writer by a friend to examine the ears of his dog, and in availing himself of this privilege he found that in Setters and other dogs where a strain of Spaniel prevails, that the drooping ears seemed to afford a natural shield to the deeper and more delicate parts of the organ, which are much exposed in these frequenters of the water and rovers of the field. The cartilage of the pinna, however, is no larger than in breeds carrying their ears erect, being absent in the most pendant part, and that portion composing the commencement of the external audi- tory canal is much dilated, forming a very large concha, which, when the external ear is in repose, is folded up, thus protecting the ear from the entrance of foreign bodies, etc. When the pendant portion of the auricle is lifted up, so as to afford a better view of the entrance to tbe external audi- tory canal, there are to be seen a nvmber of opecu'se, formed from the outer margin of the collapsed walls; one of these, larger than the rest, seems to correspond to the tragus in the human ear. When the animal is on the alert in listening, the drooping auricle is lifted ap and expanded and the pliant cartilage unfolded, the act being performed by the retrahens aurem and attollens aarem, which muscles together lift the auricle backward and upward with much energy, thus bring- ing a most efficient souDd-collecting trumpet into use. The hearing is possibly further improved in fielding by the con- stant motion of the dog's head, his ears beicg thus frequently thrown up, the act giving greater exposure to the concha. The act of expanding the auricle would seem to also ren- der the drum-bead more tense, and per contra, the dog is observed to droop his ears to loud and disagreeable sounds, the drum-head being probably relaxed in this way, while at the same time sound is more completely excluded by the collapse of tbe cartilage and the overlaying and pendant auricle. In this manner more or less complete mcifling cf the sound-traDsmitting mechanism takes place, without which the sensitive hearing organ which these animals pos- sess would be liable to injury from loud sounds. morning. About once a week soak the biscuit in hot or cold water, and mix with any kind of green vegetable or boiled potatoes, and give them in that form quite cold. If you have no vegetables handy, almost any kind of meal will do, such as_ oat-meal or barley-meal, bat it most be thoroughly well boiled. Now and again well-boiled rice 9hoold be mixed with the soaked biscuits instead of vegetables, especially if there is any sign of unsteadiness in the dogs, such as loose- ness of the bowels. It is not fair to always attribute looseness of the bowels at shows and at home to the dog biscuits that may be fed. At shows in particular, a number of causes may induce diarrhoea and it has become very easy to put it down to the dog biscuit when ten to one the excitement, especially in young dogs, change of water, or cold may have induced the trouble. No' doubt that biscuit properly made and containing the proper- ties which make them eventually so valuable as food stuffs, do contribute to a loose Btate of the bowels when the dogs have been fed on other foods containing little or no vege- tables. With a little care this laxative state passes ofi and the dog, in nine cases out of ten, is distinctly benefitted in health. There is one thing aboat biscuit feeding, that great curse- constipation—that is responsible for two-thirds of the ills in akennel, can get but a temporary hold on a dog fed on good biscuit like SprattB, Austin and Graves or Old Grist Mill. Biscuits are a deceiving matter. They are a multum in parvo in feeding and at first it is a matter of uncertainty how many are necessary for a dog's feed. St. Bernards, Great Danes, Mastiffs and similar big dogs will take aboat 4 to 6 a day in one or two meals. Pointers Setters, Greyhounds, Foxhounds and such dogs 2 to 4 bis- cuits. 0 her dogs like Fox Terriers, Bull Terriers, etc., I to 3 a day. Above all don't feed sloppy food to dogs; the teeth decay, the gums get soft, digestion is impared and the dog becomes a misery to himself and his friends. A dog should be made to use his teeth and excite the salivary glands which supply the panacea for all digestive ills. Kennel Suggestions. DOINGS IN DOGDOM. Judicious feeding is perhaps the main secret to success in dog raising. By judicious feeding is meant not only variety in diet of bone and flesh producing fuel bat also regularity and consistency in feeding. A big feed one time, then a fast and a meagre allowance because there is nothing handy, then some exertion and another big feed, wont do. In the case of puppies this results in indigestion, constipation, flatalency, irregular growth and other ills not apparent at the moment, but which sooner or later assert themselves. In raising puppies, no matter what breed, the great thing is to keep them going. If you follow your dogs yourself, a little tid-bit taken along when you visit the poppies—some- thing like that bit of steak left at dinner, a bit of raw meat ground ap in one of those handy Utile meat choppers that every kennel should possess, makes your visit welcome and fills in the chinks of your little puppies bellies. This keeping them going means a lot. The Bnipy muzzles, crooked ill-nourished legs, rickets, etc., all result from poor care. Dog biscuits are always a handy food to have in the kennel larder, as a morning meal they are very necessary, especially if fed dry. The writer has had the best results in grinding dog biscuits into bits about the size of a pea, then grinding out some raw meat and dampen- ing the whole with a little hot water, just enough to make the biscuit mix with the meal and cot choke the puppy if bolted. This is a quick meal for early morning. We believe in the early morning and the late night feeds. It is too long for a puppy to fast from 5 p. m. until 7 a. m. next morning, as n?any do these wintry days. During the day there is time for the stew meils. A good deal of ignorance exists as to the best methods of feeding biscuits. Many think that the biscuit is meant for use just as it arrives in the bag—dry and hard. Biscuits to dogs not accustomed to them are like caviar—the taste must be acquired. Other people go to the extreme, soak and boil tbe cakes, mix them with other food and serve up the whole in a sloppy mess, as if they were feeding hog3. Spratts Co. give some very good instructions on the feeding of dog bis- cuits, the advice of course applying to all. In the case of old dogs, allowances must be made. In all probability at first they will not eat the cakes dry on account of their teeth and gums being in such a state from continued soft-feediog that they cannot masticate them. Soft food has deprived them of the power of Becreting saliva, and the dry cakes would in consequence be swallowed partly in lumps and not properly masticated. Still it would be better to have this result occasionally, and to endeavor to get their teeth and gums into a healthy state and excite a proper flow of Baliva, than to leave them as they are—unless they are 8 or 9 years old, when nothing will do it. When a dog is fed on the cakes dry, before he swallows the food he completely wets it through with saliva, which the dry cake induces to flow freely. Now, nature has bestowed this power ol secreting saliva on the dog for the simple reason that it assists the digestion of his food and causes it to assimilate more readily with the gastric juices; hence the work that the digestive organs have to do is lessened through the food having been mixed with, and softened by, the saliva—nature's own digestive fluid. If the amateur will take the trouble to feed one dog on soft and another on hard food, and take the two out for a heavy day's work, and then watch their sleeping in the keonel afterwards, he will find that the dog fed on hard food sleeps quiet while the other is restless, uttering low barks, or moans or snores, or giving some other indication that digestion is not working properly. In feeding on dog cakes, do not change the food at once but gradually accustom the dogs to eat the cakes alone, then try them dry and they will gradually become accustomed to them. A dog can put in an hoar very comfortably gnawing two or three dog biscuits. The way to get down to biscuit if the dogs do not take them readily, which is seldom, is to dour soup over them, theo reduce the soup until the dog eats them dry. If the dog refuses, and so long as he is in good flesh condition, a little starving will do no harm. In beginning biscuit feeding it is well to break them np'according to size of dogs to be fed. If they are not eaten within half an hour (they should not lie before the dogs longer than this) have them all cleared ap acd nothing more given until the next Mr. Thomas Johnson, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, has notified the Secretary, Mr. Albert Betz, that be has accepted the in- vitation of the Pacific Coast Field Trial Club to judge the trials at Coronado in January. It is commonly believed that the spotted carriage dogs, once so frequently kept in England, were about the most use- less creaturei of the dog kind, maintained only for show and fashion. This is a mistake. They were used at a time when a traveling carriage carried, besides its owners, a large amount of valuable property, and the dog watched the car- riage at night when the owners were sleeping at country inns. They are not useless even now, but, on the contrary, very useful animals, and no one appreciates them more than the coachmen of whose horses they are the inseparable com- panions. The coachman of the late Prince Batthyani claimed that these dogs were the best of aids in training: spirited young carriage horses. The horse constantly looked out for the dog as it ran by its Bide, paid attention to it, and was so much engaged in thinking of its stable companion, the dog, that it was far less nervous, fidgety and shy than when taken out alone. One of his dogs was, in his phrase the "pride of the park." It used to place itself exactly be- neath the pole chains when tbe carriage was driven out, and trotting fast, would maintain its place there to an inch either in the park or in the streets in the crowd of a London sea- eon. In the stables, which were large, the carriage dog always had one favorite horse, which he slept with. But when the stud waB Bent into the country by road, he mounted guard at the door of the inn stables at night, and sometimes refused to let the indigenous ostlers and grooms enter or to go near the rugs and harness. Concerning the dogs of the Arctic regions, much has been learned since the recent opening of the Alaskan gold fields. The husky is described tersely—Neck from head to shoulders a mass of bristling hair; sharp-pointed ears, long-snouted, lips snarling, fang3 dripping; yelpiDg rather than barking; wolfish of aspect and not nice to look upon when in anger—this is the husky, or wolf-dog of the North. Much has been said of the Klondike, but these magnificent brutes, which in the beginning made that frigid El Dorado possible, have re- ceived little more than passing comment. Nor has this neglect been due to their being but the humble servants of the master, man. They are far from humble, as their wild ancestry attests. They may be beaten into submission, but that will not prevent them still snarling their hatred. They may be starved into apparent docility and then die suddenly, with teeth fast locked in a brother's throat, torn to pieces by their comrades. Rather, has little attention been accorded them because the interest of man has gravitated inexorably toward the natural, mineral, and social features of that far- northerly land. But tbe huskj is far from uninteresting. As a type of en- durance, no better evolved product of natural selection need be Bought. If ever a species has been born and bred of hard times, it has. Only the fittest, in a hard straggle for exis- tence extending through a thousand generations, have sur- vived. And they are well fit. Domesticated by the savage autochthons of that forbidding region, they may not ooly ac- count their remote ancestors as wild wolves, bat often their immediate forebears. A communication, written evidently by a very angry do» owner, appeared in the columns of a weekly contemporary (the dog department of which is conducteJ by the only com- petent dog editor in the world—he knows more about dogs than seventeen varieties of fleas do}- last Saturday. The writer of the choleric note of remonstrance does not clearly define his line of argument nor show why our statement, that the placing of Aldon Artist over Warren Clerk, was not wrong as we intimated. If the writer is sincere in a refer- ence to Artist's record as a proof of superiority over Clerk we can hardly agree with him. At the May show in this city under James Mortimer, Warren Clerk won first in puppy, novice and winners. Aldon Artist got reserve in limit and open being beaten one place in both classes by Cairnsmuir Doctor, whom he beat at last year's Oakland show (to which decision we took exception at the time, claiming there would be a reversal when the two came together again). Clerk easily won in winners over The Legnard who was first in limit and open. Clerk was in excellent condition at Tan- foran and easily beat Artist in head, eyes, body, conforma- tion, bone and Terrier character. He was off in one ear

  

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Title: Canadian forest industries 1886-1888

Identifier: canadianforest188688donm

Year: 1888 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Lumbering; Forests and forestry; Forest products; Wood-pulp industry; Wood-using industries

Publisher: Don Mills, Ont. : Southam Business Publications

Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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PUBLISHED ) SEMI-MONTHLY. J The only Newspaper devoted to the Lumber and Timber Industries published in Canada -< KIPTJO.v \ t2.oo pek uanm Y0L.6. PETERBOROUGH, ONT., AUGUST 15, 1886. NO. 16 ALASKA'S TIMBER RESOURCES. A correspondent writes to the Western World:—" Alaska is square-shaped, with two horns projecting from the southeast and south- west corners, the former called southeastern Alaska, the latter being the Aleutin islands-. This southeastern horn is the place where is con- gregated nearly all the white population enga- ged in those indutries over which the govern- ment has thrown no special protection. "Nearly all of Alaska south of the Arctic cicle may be covered with timber, except an immaterial portion facing Behring sea and the Aleutian islands, although, in the broadest sense, none of it is fit for more than local use, except southeastern Alaska, and most of this, rom its remoteness, can never expect to com- pete with the more valuable and vast timber fields of British Columbia, Oregon and Wash- ington territory until the latter are exhausted. There is one exception to this general rule, how- ever, in a very valuable kind of timber found near the tip of the southeastern horn, along the Pacific coast. I refer to the yellow cedar of Alaskan parlance. For a number of years it has been used upon the northwest coast as a fancy wood, from its exceeding fine texture, great durability, and odor which, though agree- able to the genus homo, is a sure preventive to moths, and other good qualities for cabinet making, special woodwork and so on. " The yellow cedar attains enormous size compared with the dwarfed species by which it is surrounded, often reaching a height of over 100 feet and corresponding diameter at the butt, shown by the conifer family. When I was in Boca de Quadra inlet, Alaska, not from Dixon entrance, that separates this territory from British Columbia, we had to unload 65 tons of freight a salmon cannery there, and this was done in two loads by a raft made of two logs of yellow cedar not yet thoroughly seasoned. I thought they were ten feet at the butt, so grand were the logs, but probably two-thirds that would be about the truth. Even in the region that this extremely valuable tree occupies—the third of southeastern Alaska—it is not found in large districts, either in compact forests or straggling cases among other kinds, but rather in little isolated groups, or patches here and there, 10-aire and 100 acre lots, so to speak; but, once found, this patch is quite densely populated with them. This would really be greatly in its favor in securing these ' groups as timber land. Some of them, however, are quite large, and many have never been well outlined, and others, no doubt, are yet to discovered in thin almost wild country. Most jf it grows near the water, and this phase, in an Alpine country, cut up by numberless channels auvi inlets of water running in every direction and creating thousands of islands, may be readily appreciated. Near by the old Russian towns the clumps have been extermin- ated by them before we came in possession of Russian America, and had they held it I have but little doubt it would now be worked on a large scale, or monopolized by some Moscovite favorites. While living in Oregon and the adjacent territories I often heard these valuable fields of timber discussed by parties who desired some law to protect them in securing them, and I was more than impressed with their say- ings when I afterwards visited the districts. I look on the industry based on this timber as one of the future ' bonanzas ' of Alaska, and the only one in the line of timber." TREES ON THE PACIFIC SLOPE, George H. Hamm, the well-known corres- pondent, who is " doing " British Columbia in the interests of the Winnipeg Manitoban writes as follows :—"The timber supply of the province is apparently inexhaustible, and will doubtless prove a mine of wealth before many years. Already shipments are made to the Australian, South American and Chinese markets, but the volume of trade has not as yet reached the pro- portion that it is capable of. The principal tree is the Douglas fir, which ranges from four to twelve feet in diameter, and from two hun- dred to three hundred feet high. It is straight and tough, and capable of bearing a great strain and is almost unequalled for bridging, framework and for shipbuilding, while its great length and straightness make it especially dapted for masts and spars. Besides the Douglas, the following trees are to be found in the province—the lists being obtained from a work issued by the local government: Western hemlock, large, found on coast and Columbia river; Englemaun's spruce, eastern part of province and interior plateau ; Menzie's spruce, very large, mostly on coast; great silver fir, coast tree of great size ; balsam spruce, abounds in Gold and Selkirk ranges, and east of Mc- Leod s Lake; Williamson's Alpine hemlock, | too scarce and too high up to be of much use ; red pine (yellow pine or pitch pine), a variety of the heavy yellow pine of California and Oregon, very handsome, four feet diameter, common in drier parts of interior ; white pine (mountain pine), Columbia region— Shuswap and Adarms' Lakes—also interior of Vancou- ver's island ; white-barked pine,small; western cedar (giant cedar or red cedar), wood pale, yellow or reddish color, very durable, often found 100 to 150 feet high, and 15 feet thick ; yellow cypress fellow cedar), mainland coast, Vancouver and Queen Charlotte islands; western larch, (tamarac), Rocky Mountains, .Selkirk and Gold ranges, west to Shuswap Lake, large tree, yield a strong, coarse, durable wood; maple valuable hardwood on Vancouver and adjacent islands, Queen Charlotte island and the mainland coast, up to 55°, attains a diameter of four feet; vine maple, very strong, tough whitewood, confined to coast; yew, Van- couver and opposite mainland shores, very tough and hard, and of a beautiful rose color ; crab apple, along all the coasts, wood very hard, takes good polish, and withstands great wear ; alder, two feet thick, on the Lower Frassr and along coast, good furniture wood; western birch (paper or canoe birch), Columbia region, Upper Fraser, Peace River, range and value not much known ; oak, on Vancouver Island 70 feet in height, and three feet in diameter ; dogwood, Vancouver and coast opposite. Ar- butus, close-grained, heavy, resembling box ; reaches 50 feet in height, and 20 inches in diameter, found on Vancover and neighboring islands. Aspen poplar, abounds over the whole interior, reaching a thickness of two feet. Three other varieties of poplar are found, com- monly included under the name Cottonwood. One does not extend above Yale, and is the same wood largely used in Puget Sound to make staves for sugar barrels for San Francisco. The other two kinds occur in valleys in the in- terior. Mountain ash, in the interior ; Juniper (red cedar or pencil cedar) east coast of Van- couver, and along the shores of Kamloops and other lakes in the interior. There are already some very extensive saw mills in operation — and have been cutting for a quarter of a century—and yet this branch of industry is only in its infancy. Not only is there the trans-Pacific trade, gigantic as it should soon be, but with cheap freight rates the treeless plains of the Northwest could be readi- ly supplied and profitable interchange of com- modities spring up. A THRILLING- EXPERIENCE. Detroit, Mich., July 31.—A Chicago special says : The Canadian steamer Isaac May stag- gered into harbor at a late hour on Thursday night without fuel and almost destitute of pro- visions. Captain Muir, her master, relates a thrilling experience. The May left Chicago three weeks ago, towing three barges. After a run of five days they arrived at the Manitoulin island, on the Canadian side of Lake Huron, the largest island in the great lakes, covered with cedar trees. When the vessel arrived the inhabitants were badly frightened. For weeks not a drop of rain had fallen. The steamer and her tow began to take on cargoes of posts and ties, when the woods suddenly burst into a great blaze. No sooner had the fire started than a severe wind storm swept over the island driving the flames in every direction. The people fled in terror to the beech and sought shelter on board the vessels, which pulled out into the lake. Scores of bears, roaring with pain, ran out of the woods, with the hair singed from their hides, and plunged into the lake. The flames raged for five days, burning over acres of valuable timber and des- troying a vast amount of stock piled on the beech for shipment. Then a drenching rain storm Bet in, and continued until the fire waa put out. It was ten days from the time the vessels reached there before they were ready to leive, and their stock of provisions was almoet exhausted in caring for the people who took refuge there. Still Capt. Muir thought he could make his provisions hold out until they reached Chicago.but he did not count on having head winds all the way. The vessels left the island last Saturday morning, and as dense clouds of smoke from the burning timber had settled down over the water, the vessels had to pick their way slowly through the darkness. The steamers passed the Straits on Monday, but hardly had entered Lake Michigan when they ran into another band of smoke that shut out everything from view. So thick was the atmosphere that the first barge of the tow could not be seen from the decks of the steamer. On all sides could be heard the fog signals of passing steamers. By moving slowly and sounding whistles at fre- quent intervals, the steamer made her way through the smoke in safety. Her progress had {been so greatly impeded, however, that when one hundred miles north of Chicago the engineer reported the coal bunkers empty, and the steward informed the captain that nothing was left to eat but salt pork. The crew were put under short rations and the deck load posts were drawn on to feed the furnaces, but the cedar was so green that the boilers could hardly be kept warm. Finally the steamer cnt her consorts adrift and came to Chicago under sail without them. The experience of the steamer at the Manitoulin island during the fire was thrilling. The scene from the vessels as told by a spectator was grand beyond description. The flames shot into the air for hundreds of feet and turned night into day, while the heat was so intense that the vessels were obliged to push out into the lake. The noise was deafening, and amid all the din and confusion thousands of birds fluttered around their late homes, until, tired with constant flight, they dropped into the lake or fell into the flames. Deer and bears rushed from the woods together, and threw themselves into the cooling waters of the lake. For five days the flames he'.d their sway before the lumbermen could return to island to finish loading the vessels. The barges were found off Racine and towed into port yesterday. Timber Movement Mr. J. M. Irwin has sent forward irom Lakefield to Quebec by all rail communication - eight hundred and fifty pieces of square timber during the past week. This is the first time the all rail route from here has been utilized by lumbermen for the transhipment of square timber. This mode of transport has the advantages of being quicker, less risky, and the insurance on the stock is less. Mr. Irwin will send more square timber by the same route. n , . . | . .. a a

  

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Title: Canadian forest industries January-June 1920

Identifier: canadianforjanjun1920donm

Year: 1920 (1920s)

Authors:

Subjects: Lumbering; Forests and forestry; Forest products; Wood-pulp industry; Wood-using industries

Publisher: Don Mills, Ont. : Southam Business Publications

Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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March is, l92(j CANADA LUMBERMAN Lock City Mfg. Co., Sault Ste Marie, Mich., as book-keeper. Two years later he was made manager, which post he continued to fill until 1915, when he formed a partnership with T. A. Corrigan of the Corrigan Lumber & Mill Co., Sault Ste. Marie, Out. They have built up a large business in the retail lumber line, and operate a planing mill, and sash and door factory. Mr. Corrigan looks after the manufacturing end and Mr. Hollingsworth, the executive and -ales end. He is a son of Ed. Hollingsworth!, Immigration Officer at the Soo, and has developed some splendid ideas in regard to ad- vertising and mearchandising methods in the retail lumber yard, which the "Canada Lumberman" hopes to be able to present at some length in a future issue. Mr. Hollingsworth reports that bus- iness at Sault Ste. Marie for the coming season is exceptionally good in spite of the high prices and the growing scarcity of lumber. Those Present at the Convention The following retail dealers registered during the convention in Hamilton, and the majority of them attended the sessions on both days:— Armstrong, M. H., Nicholson Lumber Company, Burlington. Bailey, A. & W. J. Bailey, Hagersville. Bailey, W. J., A. & W. T. Bailev, Jarvis. Baird, D. C. St. Marys. Barrett, E. M., Barrett Bros., Ottawa. Belton, Geo. H., Geo. H. Belton Lumber Company, London. Bond, J. S., Batts Limited, Toronto. Bond, T. G., Batts Limited, Toronto. Bowden, A., F. A. Bowden & Sons, Toronto. Bowden, V., F. A. Bowden & Sons, Limited, Toronto. Bowman, J. H., Dundas. Brennen, H., Dominion Lumber & Coal Company, Hamilton. Bryan, F. W., Bryan Manufacturing Company, Collingwood. Carew, F. J., The John Carey Lumber Company, Limited, Lindsay. Carson, W. H., Marlatt & Armstrong Company. Limited, Oakville. Carnell, John, John Carnell, Otterville. Clarke, B. F., McPherson & Clarke, Glcncoe. duff, J. J., N. Cluff & Sons, Seaforth. Coates, C. L., A. Coates & Sons, Burlington. Cole, W. T., Seaman, Kent Company, Limited, Toronto. Cole, Matthew, Cole Lumber Company, Hamilton. Comstock, M., McClellan & Company, Limited, Bowmanvilie. Cooper, D. G., Collingwood. Cowper, M., Thamesford. Crosthwaite, H., Patterson & Crosthwaite, Hamilton. Davidson, G. P., Jas. Davidson's Sons, Ottawa. Davis, M. E., McAuliffe Davis Lumber Company, Ottawa. De Laplante, A., Beaver Lumber Company, Hamilton. De Laplante, C, Beaver Lumber Company, Hamilton. Dick, Alexander, Alf. McDonald Lumber Company, Peterboro. Dixon, R., Grand Valley. Eaton, M. H., Seaman Eaton Company, Toronto. Elliott, J., D. Aitchison Company, Hamilton. Emery, W. B., Marlatt & Armstrong, Oakville. Emmonds, A. C, Mickle Dyment & Son, Brantford. Free, James, Mimico. Gardiner, J. E., P. W. Gardiner & Son, Gait. Gardiner, W. C, Builders' Moulding Company, Limited. Toronto. Gilchrist, Jas. T., Jas. T. Gilchrist Lumber Company, Toronto. Gilchrist, Jno. C, Jno. C. Gilchrist Lumber Company, Toronto. Gilchrist, R. S., The Boake Manufacturing Company, Toronto. Gillies, James, Jas. Gillies & Son, Preston. Gleave, P., D. Aitchison Company, Hamilton. Gorvctt. W. G., Arthur. Hadley, W. A., S. Hadley Lumber Company, Chatham. Harriman, J., Niagara Falls. Harrison, James, Guelph Lumber Company, Guelph. Hatch, E. S., St. Thomas. Hazen, Harry, Tillsonburg. Heise, D. M., The Seaman, Kent Company, Stouffville. Hollingsworth, F. E., Corrigan Lbr. & Mill Co., Sault Ste. Marie. Houston, G. W, Houston Company, Limited, Tweed. Houston, J. F., Houston Company, Limited, Tweed. Hubbell, C., Thamesvillc Ingleby, C. E., Ingleby-Taylor Company, Brantford. Irvin, J. C, Irvin Lumber Company, Weston. Irvin, W. C, Irvin Lumber Company, Toronto. James, John T., Bridgeburg. Jull, H. A., Ingleby-Taylor Company, Limited, Brantford. Kernohan, Geo. N., Geo. N. Kernohan Lumber Company, London. Laidlaw, Walter C, R. Laidlaw Lumber Company, Toronto. Laking, W., Riverdale Lumber Company, Toronto. Lawson, Chas. C, The Alliance Lumber Company, Hamilton. Lee, Geo. E., Taylor & Wells, Paris. Leggatt, S. S., D. Aitchison & Company, Hamilton. Long, Guy H., Consumers Lumber Company, Hamilton. Ludlam, H. S., Ludlam-Ainslie Lumber Company, Leamington. Mackenzie, J. B., Georgetown. MacDonald, A. C, P. W. Gardiner & Sons, Gait. Macabe, C, St. Clair Construction Company, Limited, Toronto. McDonald, H. A., Barton Lumber & Supply Company, Hamilton. McGibbon, J., McGibbon Limited, Sarnia. McMurray, J. E., Builders Moulding Co., Ltd., Toronto. McPherson, G. D., Merlin. Markle, W. J., Boake Manufacturing Company, Toronto. Matthews, J. A., Orangeville. Menzies, A., J. H. Bowman Lumber Company, Dundas. Merkley, A. W., Merkley & Menzies, Milton. Milmine, A. B., Stoney Creek. AND WOODWORKER Murphy, George, Eugene Murphy, Mount Forest. Paterson, T. A., Mickle, Dyment & Son, Toronto. Patterson, Thos., Patterson & Crosthwaite, Hamilton. Penwarden, E. 0., Green Lumber Company, St. Thomas. Press, R. J., The Alliance Lumber Company, Hamilton, Rastall, R. A., W. Rastall Lumber Company, Limited, Toronto. Reid, J. B. Reid & Company, Toronto. Rhind, A., Simpson Planing Mills, Toronto. Richardson, Fred, Ingersoll. Richards, L. H., R. Laidlaw Lumber Company, Sarnia. Robertson, C. R., W. C. Edwards & Company, Limited, Ottawa. Rose, A. G., Jas. Davidson's Sons, Ottawa. Roussell, T. J., T. J. Roussell & Son, Hamilton. Rutherford, J. H., Cole Lumber Co., Hamilton. Sage, F. W., Dominion Lumber Company, Hamilton. Sanders, A. R., Sanders & Bell, Limited, St. Thomas. Savage, W. E. S., Mimico. Saunders, W., Dutton. Scofield, J. C, Windsor Lumber Company, Windsor. Shirton, K. J., The Wm. Shirton Company, Limited, Dunnville. Smith, C. M., Aylmer. Smith, D. G., John B. Smith & Sons, Ltd., Toronto. Smith, Ed. S., Dominion Lumber & Coal Co., Ltd., Hamilton. Sparling, James, Meaford. Streight, J. E. L., J. E. L. Streight, Islington. Swan, H. A. L., Ottawa Lumbermen's Credit Bureau, Ottawa. Taylor, C. H., Dominion Lumber Company, Hamilton. Taylor, E., Taylor & Wells, Paris. Taylor, Fred, Hamilton. Tennant, W. B., John B. Smith & Sons, Limited, Toronto. Thompson, F., W. F., Petry, Toronto. Thompson, R. A., Thompson & Thompson, Atwood. Thomson, W. H., Thompson Bros., Port Credit. Tupling, W. M., J. R. Eaton & Sons, Limited, Orillia. Van Blaricom, G. B., "Canada Lumberman," Toronto. Wallace, J. T., Dyment Baker Lumber Company, London. Warwick, T. C., Blenheim. Watt, John, Watt Milling Company, Toronto. West, Wm., West & Jackson, Tillsonburg. Wiggans, R. G., Geo. M. Mason, Limited, Ottawa. Winlaw, R., The Winlaw Company, Ingersoll. Zimmerman, H., Streetsvillc. Zimmerman, M. B., Consumers Lumber Company, Hamilton.

 

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Gore Park—A beauty spot and breathing space in heart of Hamilton's Business District British Stocks Will Not Be Sold Here A rumor has been heard in some quarters that the British Gov- ernment was. willing to sell that portion of its stock of lumber re- maining in the Dominion to a syndicate to be marketed in Canada. S. G. Denman, of Montreal, when seen in reference to the matter, stated officially that it was the intention of the British Government to export to the United Kingdom all their overlying stocks now held in Eastern Canada, and that there was absolutely no truth in the report that these goods were to be disposed of locally. Mr. Denman is of the opinion that the rumor arose from the re- port that the French Government stock, consisting of about 50,000,- 000 feet b.m., is being thrown on the market in Eastern Canada. Alaskan Lumber for Australian Market It is reported in the press that a firm in Sydney, Australia, has entered into a contract with a lumber concern in Alaska for the supply of 59,000,000 feet of lumber. The contract is stated to give the buyers the option of extend- ing the order to 90,000,000 feet, and stipulates that 80 per cent, of the lumber must be spruce and 20 per cent, hemlock. It is antici- pated that difficulty will be experienced in securing tonnage to trans- port the lumber to Australia, as it is roughly estimated that fifty- nine vessels, each carrying 1,000,000 feet of lumber, will be required.

  

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Title: Bulletin

Identifier: bulletin3011907smit

Year: 1901 (1900s)

Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology

Subjects: Ethnology

Publisher: Washington : G. P. O.

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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increasing wariness. The material used for liooks by the Indians was wood, bone, shell, stone, antl copper. The Mohave eniplo3'ed the recurved spines of certain species of cactus, which are natural hooks. Data on the arche- ology of the fish- hook have been gathered from the Ohio mounds and the shell-heaps of Santa Barbara, Cal., unbarbed hooks of bone having been found on a number of Ohio sites and gorge hooks atSanta Barl)ara. The fish- hook of recent times may be best studied among the x. Pa- cific tribes and the Eskimo of Alaska. The INIakah of Wash- ington have a modified form of the gorge hook, consisting of a sharpened spine of bone attached with a ]>ine-root lash to a whalebone. British Columbian and s. Alaskan tribes used either a simple hook of bent wood having a barb lashed to a point, or a compound hook consistingof a shank of wood, a splint of pine- root lashed at an angle of 45° to its lower end, and a simple or barbed spike of bone, wood, iron, or copper lashed or set on the outer end of the splint. Eskimo hooks consisted frequently of a shank of bone with a curved, sharpened spike of metal set in the lower end, or several spikes were set in, forming a gig. Usu- ally, however, the Eskimo hook had the upper half of its shank made of stone and the lower half of ivory, in which the unbarbed curved spike of metal was set, the parts being fastened together by lashings of split quill. A leader of quill was attached to the hook and a bait of cral> carapace was hung above the spike. This is the most complex hook known in aboriginal America. Lines and poles varied like the hook with the customs of the fishermen, the habits of the fish, and the environment. The Eskimo used lines of knotted lengths of whalebone quill, hair, or sinew; the n.

 

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HOOK;Arkan- sas; Actual Size, (hau) (rau) Pacific tribes, lines of twisted bark, pine root, and kelp; and other tribes lines of twisted fiber. Short poles or none were used by the p]skimo and x. Pacific tribes. In other regions it is probable that long poles of cane or saplings were used. In some regions, as on the N. \V. coast, a trawl, consisting of a series of hooks attached by leaders to a line, was used for taking certain species of fish. The Haida, according to Swanton, made a snap hook, consisting of a hoop of wood, the ends of which were held apart by a wooden peg. This jieg was displaced l^y the fish on taking the bait, and the ends of the hoop snapped together, holding the fish b-< the jaw. (See FisJiing.) Consult'Boas in 6th Rep. B. A. E., 1888; Goddard in Univ. Cal. Publ., Am. Archfeol. and EthroL, i, 1903; Hoffman in 14th Rep. B. A. E. pt 2,1896; Holmes in 2d Rep. B. A. E., 1883; Mills (1) in Ohio Archaeol. and Hist. Quar., ix, no. 4, 1901, (2) ibid., xv, no. 1, 1906; Moore (1) in Jour. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., xi, 1899, (2) ibid., XII, 1903, (3) ibid., xiii, 1905; Murdoch in 9th Rep. B. A. E., 1892; Nelson in 18th Rep. B. A. E., pt 1, 1899; Niblack in Rep. Nat. Mus. 1888, 1890; Palmer in Am. Nat., xii, no. 6, 1878; Put- nam in Wheeler Surv. Rep., vii, 1879; Rau in Smithson. Cont., xxv, 1884; Teit in Mem. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., ii, Anthrop. I, 1900; Turner in 11th Rep. B. A. E., 1894. (w. H.) Fishing. At the first coming of the Europeans the waters of this continent were found teeming with food fish, the great abundance of which quickly attract- ed fleets of fishermen from all civilized parts of the Old World. The list of spe- cies living in American waters utilized by the Indians would fill a volume. The abundance or scarcity of this food on the Atlantic coast varied with the season. In epring the fish made their appearance in vast shoals in the spawning beds of the coast and in the bays and rivers. Capt. John Smith relates, in his History of Virginia, early in the 17th century, "that on one occasion fish were encountered in such numbers in the Potomac as to im- pede landing from his boat. The annual spring run of herring above Washington is still almost great enough to warrant the assertion. Fish life varied with locality and season. On the northern and east- ern coasts the fish disappeared to a great extent when the waters became cold at the approach of winter, and many northern fishes went to more southerly waters. Among the better known food i3roducts furnished by the waters of the country may be mentioned the whale, sea lion, seal, otter, swordfish, sturgeon, porpoise, cod, haddock, halibut, pollock, salmon, trout, herring, shad, perch, bass, mack-

  

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Title: Canadian forest industries 1897-1899

Identifier: canadianforest189799donm

Year: 1899 (1890s)

Authors:

Subjects: Lumbering; Forests and forestry; Forest products; Wood-pulp industry; Wood-using industries

Publisher: Don Mills, Ont. : Southam Business Publications

Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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m CANADA LUMBERMAN Volume XIX. Number 4. } TORONTO, ONT,, f\PRIL, 1898 Terms,$1.00 Per Year. Single Copies, 10 Cents. THE NATIONAL WHOLESALE LUMBER DEALERS' ASSOCIATION. By far the most important organization of its kind in the United States is the National Whole- sale Lumber Dealers' Association, which em- braces a large number of the prominent whole- sale dealers of the Eastern States. This asso- ciation held its sixth annual meeting at Cleve- land, Ohio, on Wednesday, March 3rd, the busi- ness which formerly occupied two days being, by judicious arrangement, executed in one day. There was a fairly good attendance from Buffalo, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Saginaw, Tona- wanda and other cities. The following Buf- falo houses were represented : Montgomery Bros. & Co., Superior Lumber Co., Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Co., Empire Lumber Co., Noyas & Sawyer, Charles M. Betts & Co., Haines & Co., H. M. Loud & Sons Lumber Co., Hurd & Hauenstein, Hugh McLean & Co., J. C. Anthony & Son, and Underhill & Poole. The Tonawanda contingent included representatives of Smith, Fassett & Co., Rider & Frost, W. H. Sawyer Lumber Co. and H. M. Tyler & Co. We notice that the membership of this association also includes the names of E. C. Grant, of the Ottawa Lumber Com- pany ; E. H. Lemay, of Montreal ; and the Gillies Lumber Company, Ottawa. Space will only permit of brief reference to the most important subjects considered. Following the reading of the address of the president, Col. Betts, and the presentation of the secretary's statement, Mr. Edward F. Henson read the report of the Fire Insurance Committee, which stated that there were five insurance companies in the district devoted solely to the interests of lumbermen. They were all successful, the one most so being the Northwestern Retail Lumber Dealers' Insurance Association, which had been the means of securing very cheap insurance for lumbermen. A resolution was passed favoring a uniform bankruptcy law. The report of the committee on membership recommended that the secretary visit the lumber districts and solicit new members for the association. Mr. Pendennis White, of Tonawanda, read an interesting paper on " The Scalper and the Illegitimate Trade," which created a lively discussion. Another interesting question discussed was what an article costs the manufacturer to produce and sell, and what it costs the lumberman not manufacturing to put his lumber on the market. The general opinion seemed to be that ample pains was not taken to ascertain what the lumber actually cost the dealer or manufacturer. The choice of the association was unanimously in favor of Hon. John N. Scatcherd, of Buffalo, as president. Mr. Scatcherd, whose portrait we present, is of the well known lumber firm of Scatcherd & Son, who handle large quantities of Canadian hardwoods. His election should be a source of gratification to the trade at Buffalo, while all agree that he is eminently qualified for the duties which he will be called upon to per- form. John S. Eastabrook, Saginaw, and Robert C. Lippincott, Philadelphia, were chosen first and second vice-presidents respectively. The convention closed with a successful banquet. TIMBER RESOURCES OF THE KLONDYKE. Mr. Ivan Petroff, special agent of the United States government in Alaska for the tenth census,

 

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Hon. John N. Scatcherd, President-Elect National Wholesale Lumber Dealers' Association. has furnished some interesting information re- garding the forests of Alaska. The trees are mainly evergreen, the spruce family predominat- ing. White birch is also found throughout the region that supports the spruce, chiefly among the watercourses. The alder and willow are found on all the lowlands, reaching beyond the western and northern limits of the spruce. A poplar resembling the cottonwood of the United States, and which, under favorable circum- stances, attains a large size, is also found in the timber sections of Alaska south of the Arctic circle. As is well known, there are considerable forests along the south Alaskan coast, being a continuation of the great forests of Washington and British Columbia, the south-eastern Alaskan climate being very similar to that further south, though, of course, somewhat colder. POSSIBILITIES OF TRADE WITH FOREIGN COUNTRIES. Mr. Edmund E. Sheppard, Dominion Trade Commissioner to Mexico, Central and South America, has submitted his final report to the Department of Trade and Commerce, in which he refers at some length to the possibilities of increasing our trade with these countries. His observations and conclusions of the lumber trade are of special interest to Canadian manufacturers, and are given below : LUMBER. Returning to our starting point, Mexico does not take the lumber from Canada that should be exported to that country. Her trade is nearly all with the Southern States of North America, which, owing to contiguity on the Gulf side, affords a more available source of supply. Nevei theless, in white pine and spruce on the Gulf side and British Columbia pine on the Pacific side, agents of our lumbermen should do a very profitable business. BRAZIL.—In Brazil, owing to the fact that an insect attacks white pine and burrows through it until it is almost like a handful of ashes, white pine is little used except for decorative purposes and doors and windows, where it is needed for its lightness, and is protected by varnishes and paint. Yellow pine, owing to the large quantity of pitch it contains and comparative freedom from insect attack, is esteemed preferable. In my extended report on Brazil, I have given the statistics of this trade. It amounted in the year named to only about $52,000. Already one Canadian agent at least has endeavored to increase this export, and in the interior and the southern parts of the country the importation of material suitable for window-frames and doors should be very large ; but as I have before remarked, it will have to be pushed under personal supervision, the broken cargoes from United Slates ports being more acceptable than our large direct cargoes. Uruguay.—Uruguay imported in 1896 $517,000 worth of pine, $500,000 of it from the United States. The total imports of timber were $771,000 (gold). Argentina.—Our direct export ol lumberto Argen- tina in 1896 was $410,000 ; in 1897 it was $538,000, and can be very largely increased, as the woods of that country suitable for lumber are giown nearly altogether in the south towards Patagonia and are very heavy and not adapted to the purposes for which white pine is used. In the three countries last enum- erated spruce is nearly altogether brought from Maine, and handling it is already a very large business. The export of portions of houses already prepared is success- ful in but few countries, owing to the tariffs, but the export of white pine lumber to Argentina, there to be milled and made into doors and sashes and frames in the yard where it is received, should be a very profitable business, for of all the countries of the South, Argentina is most rapidly increasing in population, the stretches of arable land being enormous, and the erection of small dwellings proceeding at a very rapid rate. The export to Argentina of lumber suitable for the fitting of cattle vessels is also an important feature, and is already to a considerable extent in the hands of a Canadian who is familiar with both the lumber and cattle business, but un- fortunately he is not taking all his supplies from this country. Our lumber business to Argentina, instead of being about $420,000 per annum, should be five times that sum. A table I have prepared shows the average move- ment of lumber, as well as of other import articles, shipped to the River Platte, which includes Uruguay and Paraguay. While I was in Argentina Congress was in session, and what was considered the unneighborly conduct of the

  

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Title: Report of the commissioner of fish and fisheries on investigations in the Columbia River basin in regard to the salmon fisheries [microform]

Identifier: cihm_15996

Year: 1894 (1890s)

Authors: McDonald, Marshall, 1835-1895; Gilbert, Charles H. (Charles Henry), 1859-1928; Evermann, Barton Warren, 1853-1932; United States

Subjects: Salmon fisheries; Fishery law and legislation; Salmon fishing; Saumon; Pêche commerciale; Saumon

Publisher: Washington : G. P. O.

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Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

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54

 

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INVEsTIOATIOiVS K-f TUF COLUMBIA RIVKK BASIN. VimxT with .1 rcry narrow liiuirt o' ti-eth; p»l".tinc8 iinlifd; «kiii whoUv naked, InU-nil line "omplctd. Dor^inl (inn imt joiiitMl iirili-st* Btcxtn-iiie lm«p; fiii» iill Imv. tlit^ peed.nils l)iiri<ly rfB<liiiiK fror.t (if iiiiiii; fruiit of aiial .tiiiler tliird ray of h*-!'"-!!! ilortiil. It.t Inut ray under fourth fmii l,.^t ray of laltir. Tree lortion of faiidnl peiliiiicle ^lll•!^Mld Ia«t anal ruyi contain m! 1} in licn.i; portinii ln-liind tinHPof last dorsal ray 3 in heiKl; nnither dorsal iiorHiiul roa<'liir(( liiiKo of raiidiij wlien ileiirenhcd. t e( nrscly Bpoilid or blodhed as in philoiiijit; dornal barn indistiui't; two narrow hlaok lin<» ilownward and liaokword from tlie eye; an evenly oonvex dark bar at base of oandnl dorsalH, pectorals, and cyndal faintly crossbarrod. Len ,'t!i HI mm. The /«t'Cond specimen, which is 71 mm. long, agrees cUtsely in every respect with the tj pe. This species in very closely reJati'd to Co((u» philnnipn, from wriich il ditVcru only in the total ubsenre of iii y preo])t'rcular spine. In both specimens, and on each hiilc, the |)rcopcr- ciilft' margin is ' dirtVrs in numy important res|)ects, and is undoubtedly dis*tiiic.'. Thus the Alaskan form hiis the posterior nostrils in short but ccnspicuouB tubes, the prorliital i rod need into a lobe which conceals all of the maxillary eice|)t tho extreme tip, ar.i tl:e dorunl tin with 8 or 9 spines and \'^ to 20 30ft rays. Cottiit pliilonips is ;>. •" tying into tlie South Fork of tho Ciour d'Alene River, near Ward- ner, Idaho. We have also seen Hpecinnns t.'iken from Birch Creek, in wesleru Idaho, by Merriam and ISailey. 37. CottUB rcargiuatuB Hean. Six small .,pceimenH from Mill Creek at Walla Walla (the type locality of marffinatiiii) »gTCi! with Bean's description and diirer from all other western .specimens of Coitus which wo have spc.i in having but three sr)ft rays in the ventral (ins. So far as can be ascertained from our very immature specimens, .narfiiunliit strongly resembles pirpicrui, with which it agrees in fin rays, naked skin, the incomplete lateral line, and the absence of palatii'e teeth. C. perpUruH has constantly 4 soft rays in the ventral fins, and other differinces may appear when conipired with adult speeimeiis. In our Rpeeimens of marf/inaluii, the anus varies in jiosition, being sometimes nearer base of caudal fin than snout, sometimes nearer snout. Twenty-two •mall specimens, coll"' ted by Hcaa and Woolimm at Sand Point, Idaiio, are for tho pronent referred to tins npeciuu, though we aie not certain that this idtmtilicatiou is corrects, Tho veutrals 1 jcin to be t, 3, bitt the body is more or les* covered with priukles.

  

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Ediz Hook, Port Angeles, WA

 

Two mills are among the top private employers in Port Angeles as of 2007, although both had seen changes in ownership. The pulp mill at Ediz Hook passed from Crown Zellerbach to Daishowa America and then to Nippon Paper Industries.

 

The cooperative plywood mill was worker-run for 30 years until the owners sold it to ITT in 1971. It was bought by Klukwan, Inc., an Alaskan Native village corporation in 1989, and is now known as K Ply.

 

www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/nippon-paper-mill-cogener...

 

August 12, 2016:

The paper mill that has anchored Ediz Hook for 98 years is for sale.

 

The Nippon Paper Industries USA plant and the company’s newly built biomass cogeneration plant west of downtown Port Angeles are being marketed for sale by PricewaterhouseCoopers Corporate Finance LLC in southwest British Columbia.

 

There is no sign the mill, which employed 160 as of June 2015, would be closed, said City Manager Dan McKeen.

 

PWC Managing Partner Rishi Kapoor invited the Port of Port Angeles to consider purchasing Nippon in a July 25 email to port Executive Director Karen Goschen.

 

“We are working with our client (Nippon Paper – Japan) on running a formal sale process for the Pulp and Paper Mill & Co-Gen [cogeneration] facility located adjacent to the Port Angeles Harbour,” Kapoor said in the email.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ediz_Hook

 

Ediz Hook

Ediz Hook is a 3-mile-long (4.8 km) sand spit that extends from northern shore of the Olympic Peninsula at Port Angeles northeasterly into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The end of the spit serves as home for the Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles. It is also the base of operations for the Puget Sound Pilots.

 

Much of the spit is accessible by car on the Ediz Hook Road (1.5 to 2 miles), which passes several turnouts and picnic areas, with broad views of Port Angeles and the Olympic Mountains, notably the peaks of Mount Angeles and Klahhane Ridge. To the north marine traffic can be observed, and orca pods, harbor seals and other marine life can be spotted. Several long stretches of public beach facilitate beachcombing and birding. The end of the spit is used by the Coast Guard and not accessible to visitors.

 

"The Hook" was created by wind and tidal action along the southern edge of the Strait, that carried sediment from the delta of the Elwha River eastward. The presence of the sand spit creates a natural harbor to the south, with the spit sheltering the area off Port Angeles from the large ocean-sourced swells that roll eastward down the Strait.

 

The calm waters of the harbor and sandy beaches attracted people to the area long before the appearance of European explorers and settlers. Recently uncovered archeological evidence indicates that a community, known today as Tse-whit-zen, was occupied for generations by the Klallam Native American people.

 

For the past few decades, notable erosion of Ediz Hook has occurred. This is believed to be caused by the presence of the Elwha River dams, which have reduced the amount of sediment carried by the river. The Elwha Ecosystem Restoration project has completed a program of dam removal that has restored the original flow patterns of the Elwha river and is expected to diminish this loss. Several projects have added large boulders to the northwest side of the spit to slow its erosion and protect the Port Angeles Harbor.

Breakfast at Ediz Hook, Port Angeles, WA

 

Two mills are among the top private employers in Port Angeles as of 2007, although both had seen changes in ownership. The pulp mill at Ediz Hook passed from Crown Zellerbach to Daishowa America and then to Nippon Paper Industries.

 

The cooperative plywood mill was worker-run for 30 years until the owners sold it to ITT in 1971. It was bought by Klukwan, Inc., an Alaskan Native village corporation in 1989, and is now known as K Ply.

 

www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/nippon-paper-mill-cogener...

 

August 12, 2016:

The paper mill that has anchored Ediz Hook for 98 years is for sale.

 

The Nippon Paper Industries USA plant and the company’s newly built biomass cogeneration plant west of downtown Port Angeles are being marketed for sale by PricewaterhouseCoopers Corporate Finance LLC in southwest British Columbia.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ediz_Hook

 

Ediz Hook

Ediz Hook is a 3-mile-long (4.8 km) sand spit that extends from northern shore of the Olympic Peninsula at Port Angeles northeasterly into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The end of the spit serves as home for the Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles. It is also the base of operations for the Puget Sound Pilots.

 

Much of the spit is accessible by car on the Ediz Hook Road (1.5 to 2 miles), which passes several turnouts and picnic areas, with broad views of Port Angeles and the Olympic Mountains, notably the peaks of Mount Angeles and Klahhane Ridge. To the north marine traffic can be observed, and orca pods, harbor seals and other marine life can be spotted. Several long stretches of public beach facilitate beachcombing and birding. The end of the spit is used by the Coast Guard and not accessible to visitors.

 

"The Hook" was created by wind and tidal action along the southern edge of the Strait, that carried sediment from the delta of the Elwha River eastward. The presence of the sand spit creates a natural harbor to the south, with the spit sheltering the area off Port Angeles from the large ocean-sourced swells that roll eastward down the Strait.

 

The calm waters of the harbor and sandy beaches attracted people to the area long before the appearance of European explorers and settlers. Recently uncovered archeological evidence indicates that a community, known today as Tse-whit-zen, was occupied for generations by the Klallam Native American people.

 

For the past few decades, notable erosion of Ediz Hook has occurred. This is believed to be caused by the presence of the Elwha River dams, which have reduced the amount of sediment carried by the river. The Elwha Ecosystem Restoration project has completed a program of dam removal that has restored the original flow patterns of the Elwha river and is expected to diminish this loss. Several projects have added large boulders to the northwest side of the spit to slow its erosion and protect the Port Angeles Harbor.

Title: Bulletin of the U.S. Department of Agriculture

Identifier: bulletinofusdep926950unit

Year: 1913-1923. (1910s)

Authors: United States. Dept. of Agriculture

Subjects: Agriculture; Agriculture

Publisher: [Washington, D. C. ?] : The Dept. : Supt. of Docs. , G. P. O.

Contributing Library: American Museum of Natural History Library

Digitizing Sponsor: American Museum of Natural History Library

  

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1 BULLETIN No. 950 4^"^5L Contribution from the Forest Service WILLIAM B. GREELEY, Forester

 

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Washington, D. C. June 15, 1921 REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF PULPWOOD RESOURCES OF THE TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST, ALASKA. By Clinton G. Smith, Forest Inspector. CONTENTS. Objects of this statement Demand for pulp and paper Advantages, of regional development- Importance of Alaska as a source of paper supply ; Location of the region Communication and accessibility- Topographic and other surface features Climate of the region Timber and stand Quality of timber Suitability for pulp and paper._ Logging . Labor Construction of improvements Operating materials and mill sup- plies Disposal of mill effluents Water supply Water power 9 10 11 13 14 14 15 15 16 Water-power permits Developed water power in Alaska- Fuel Markets Taxes Freight rates Procedure in Government sales Authority to sell timber Policy Stumpage prices and readjust- ments , , Stumpage price readjustments in Canada Financial standing of purchasers- Amount of capital required Applications for timber and water power , Time required to secure contract References Maps and surveys Sample agreement Map of Tongass National Forest 18 18 19 19 20 20 22 23 23 24 26 26 27 27 28 28 28 29 40 OBJECTS OF THIS STATEMENT. This statement has been prepared to aid those who wish informa- tion on the timber and other resources of the Tongass National Forest in Alaska, to indicate the capital and organization necessary for the development of Alaskan pulp and paper mills, to show what data on the timber resources of that region have been and are being collected by the Forest Service, and to outline the conditions of pur- chase of timber on the National Forests.1 1 Acknowledgment is made to the Forest Products Laboratory for technical features; particularly to a report by H. E. Surface, entitled " Conditions Existing for the Manu- facture of Pulp and Paper in Alaska," material from which has been freely used; and also to the district forester at Portland, Oreg., for valuable assistance. 29729°—21 ^1

  

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Title: American forestry

Identifier: americanforestry201914amer

Year: 1910-1923 (1910s)

Authors: American Forestry Association

Subjects: Forests and forestry

Publisher: Washington, D. C. : American Forestry Association

Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

  

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THE PANAMA CANAL AND THE LUMBER TRADE 91

 

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Boom of Logs and Sawtviill at Douglas, Alaska. the deep fiord-like "canals" of the alaskan coast offer exceptional opportunities for rafting logs and for loading them from the wharves to ocean-going vessels. importance to the yellow pine manu- facturers is in the Argentine Republic where there is a very large demand. Southern shippers are familair with the needs of this market and would offer resistance to any incursions in their selling territory. The West Coast of South America will probably always remain largely in the hands of the western lumber producers owing to their proximity . The cheaper freight rate, coupled with the fact that fir limiber usually sells at a lower f.o.b. mill price will largely discourage yellow pine men from seeking to develop a market in that part of the world. The same is true also of the Asiatic markets whose demands for our lumber have not increased greatly during the last de- cade. It is more than probable that out- side of the limiber shipped there from the west coast that the chief supplies will be drawn from Japan, Formosa and Siberia, all close at hand. It is not to be expected that the opening of the Panama Canal will either be a panacea for all of the troubles of the Coast lumbermen or the means of giving the people of the eastern part of the United States cheaper limiber, since it will take some years to build up a trade in western lumber and to develop shipping and terminal facilities so that the movement of large quantities of fir lumber will be possible. In the meantime the advancing price of stump- age and the reduction in the annual out- put of southern yellow pine, its greatest competitor, will have reduced compe- tition and the territory now controlled by the pine manufacturers will gradually be absorbed by the Coast manufac- turers without any marked reduction in lumber prices—probably at an increased price. We need not expect cheaper lumber on the eastern seaboard because of the opening of the Canal but we may reasonably hope to have a more gradual increase in lumber values than we would be warranted in expecting if the pro- ducts of the great forests of the West were not to be made available to us at a transportation cost much lower than now prevails.

  

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Title: American forests

Identifier: americanforests20natiuoft

Year: (s)

Authors: National Irrigation Association (U. S. ); New Jersey Forestry Association; South Jersey Woodmen's Association; American Forestry Association

Subjects: Forests and forestry -- Periodicals

Publisher: Washington [etc. ] American Forestry Association [etc. ]

Contributing Library: Earth Sciences - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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THE PANAMA CANAL AND THE LUMBER TRADL 91

 

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Boom of Logs and Sawmill at Douglas, Alaska. THE DEEP fiord-like "CAKALS" OF THE ALASKAN COAST OFFER EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR RAFTING LOGS AND FOR LOADING THEM FROM THE WHARVES TO OCEAN-GOING VESSELS. importance to the yellow pine manu- facturers is in the Argentine Republic where there is a very large demand. Southern shippers are familair with the needs of this market and would offer resistance to any incursions in their selling territory. The West Coast of South America will probably always remain largely in the hands of the western lumber producers owing to their proximity . The cheaper freight rate, coupled with the fact that fir lumber usually sells at a lower f.o.b. mill price will largely discourage yellow pine men from seeking to develop a market in that part of the world. The same is true also of the Asiatic markets whose demands for our Itraiber have not increased greatly during the last de- cade. It is more than probable that out- side of the lumber shipped there from the west coast that the chief supplies will be drawn from Japan, Formosa and Siberia, all close at hand. It is not to be expected that the opening of the Panama Canal will either be a panacea for all of the troubles of the Coast lumbermen or the means of giving the people of the eastern part of the United vStates cheaper lumber, since it will take some years to build up a trade in western lumber and to develop shipping and terminal facilities so that the movement of large quantities of fir lumber will be possible. In the meantime the advancing price of stump- age and the reduction in the annual out- put of southern yellow pine, its greatest competitor, will have reduced compe- tition and the territory now controlled by the pine manufacturers will gradually be absorbed by the Coast manufac- turers without any marked reduction in lumber prices—probably at an increased price. We need not expect cheaper lumber on the eastern seaboard because of the opening of the Canal but we may reasonably hope to have a more gradual increase in lumber values than we would be warranted in expecting if the pro- ducts of the great forests of the West were not to be made available to us at a transportation cost much lower than now prevails.

  

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Title: The water birds of North America [microform]

Identifier: cihm_05652

Year: 1884 (1880s)

Authors: Baird, Spencer F. , 1823-1887; Brewer, T. M. (Thomas Mayo), 1814-1880

Subjects: Birds; Water-birds; Oiseaux; Oiseaux aquatiques

Publisher: Boston : Little, Brown

Contributing Library: www.flickr.com/search/?tags=bookcontributorCanadiana_org

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

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â i i I lis if 120 PR^COCIAL GIIALLATORE^! â LIMIC'OL^. Remuiiider of the lower parts, upper part of tla- ntiiip, upper tail-toverta, and ends of secondaries, pure white. BreeiUny-jdum'tiie: Uppi'r jtarts dr. Icy lilaciiish, the wiiii,'-covorta li^'htf-r, lUDro brownish gray, tlie featliei's showing darker centre- ; back and scapuhus little, if at all, varied with rufous; crown dusky, unifoni, or streaked. Spriinj (and winter.') p/nimtrje: Ujjper parts nii.xed black and briglit lufous, the latter color occupying chiefly the middle of the back (longitudinally) and the wing-coverts, the scapulars and tertials nii.\ed black and rufous. Piieuni more streaked with white, and markings about the head and neck more sharply defmed than in the summer dress, "Bill black; iris lia/el ; feet deep orange-red, claws black" (AlI)L'Bon). Yountj: Head chieHy mill led grayish, witlnnit well-delined markings ; black of the jugulum and breast indicated by niou'.ed dusky, occupying the same area, but not sharply defined ; upper parts grayish dusky, the feathers bordered terminally with butf or whitish. Total length about 9 inches; wing, 0.1X1; tail, 2.50 ; culmeu, .80-.90; tarsus, 1.00; middle toe, .7o.

 

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Spring plunwfie. The variations noted in a series of more than sixty specimens of this species are chiefly individ- ual and seasonal. Examples are variously intermediate, according to the season, hetween the two quite distinct stages of plumage described above as the breeding and the winter dress. Unfortu- nately there are very few specimens from other countries than America, so that we cainiot say whether those from diH'erent continents differ perceptibly. Two European examples, however, in the winter livery, seem identical with American skins. The specimens in the daik, dull-colored summer plumage have been erroneously considered as sho "ing a tendency toward the charactei's of S. vulanocephalus, or forming the " connecting link " betwt n that species and S. interpres â thij view being apparently based on geographical consider- ations, the specimens upon which this o])inion was founded conung from the Prybilof Islands. Specimens in the same plumage occur, however, thi.ntghout the northern regions, including the Old World, and apparently represent simply the sum.ner dress. The series of sununer specimens from other idealities than Alaska, however, is unfortunately very small; and it may possibly prove true, that what we ,;ave described above as the breeding- plumage of true S. interpres represents really a darker-colo' ^d Alaskan race, and that the brighter- colored plumage described as the winter dvess is really the full breeding-plumage of true interpres. However this may be, the dark Alaskan birds have nothing whatever to do with S. melanocepliedus, which has not oidy veiy different proportions, but also in every stage a conspicuously different pattern of coloration. The Common Tiu-nstone is one of the most widely distributed and at the same time one of the r .ost abundant of l)ird.s. Breeding in great numbers in all the high Arctic regions, oi- i in the northern portions of both continents, it wanders thence southward over a!' lands. It is found at certain seasons on both the Atlantic and Pacific shores, and also in the interior of North and South America, as far even as the Straits of Magellan. It has been taken in various parts of Europe, Africa, and Asia.

  

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Alaskan Black Cod, BBQ Pork Belly & Squash Dumpling in a Matsutake Mushroom Broth

 

served with Sandhill "Small Lots" Viognier, British Columbia

 

Kodiak - August 22, 2012

 

Pictured above is Begich staffer and NOAA fellow Bill Mowitt.

 

Bill Mowitt, Begich NOAA Fellow

 

On Kodiak Island, an incredible find. The Kodiak High School arts students have made quite an exhibit out of marine debris. Meet "Ophelia." Looking forward to meeting more Alaskans this afternoon at our mobile office at Mill Bay Coffee and Pastries.

 

Alaskan Black Cod, BBQ Pork Belly & Squash Dumpling in a Matsutake Mushroom Broth

 

Wine pairing: Sandhill "Small Lots" Viognier, British Columbia

1