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Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: The seven scientists asked to testify for the defense standing in front of the Defense Mansion.

Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: The seven scientists asked to testify for the defense standing in front of the Defense Mansion. Rural countryside near Dayton, Tennessee Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Cumberland Coal & Iron Company buildings, Dayton, Tennessee. Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Dayton, Tennessee, High School Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Ova Corvin ("Precious") Rappleyea, standing on steps of the Defense Mansion. Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Howard Gale Byrd, Charles Francis Potter, with Byrd's children John and Lillian, in front of Byrd's parsonage in Dayton, Tennessee. Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Dayton, Tennessee Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Rhea County (Tennessee) Courthouse Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Rhea County (Tennessee) Courthouse Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Dayton, Tennessee Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Dayton, Tennessee, High School Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: John Thomas Scopes (l) and George Washington Rappleyea (r) Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: John Thomas Scopes Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Unidentified man in front of auto dealership, Dayton, Tennessee. Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: George Washington Rappleyea (l) and John Thomas Scopes (r) Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Howard Gale Byrd, outside the Defense Mansion. Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Outdoor proceedings on July 20, 1925, showing William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow. [4 of 4 photos] Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: George Washington Rappleyea Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: George Washington Rappleyea (left) and Charles Francis Potter (right). Tennessee v. John T. Scopes Trial: Ova Corvin ("Precious") Rappleyea (married to George Rappleyea).

During 1925, Watson Davis (1896-1967), Science Service managing editor, took numerous photographs while covering the State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes trial as a reporter. In what was dubbed "The Trial of the Century," Scopes was tried and convicted for violating a state law prohibiting the teaching of the theory of evolution. William Jennings Bryan served on the prosecution team, and Clarence Darrow defended Scopes. Almost eighty years later, the nitrate negatives, including portraits of trial participants, and images from the trial itself and significant places in Dayton, were discovered in archival material donated to the Smithsonian by Science Service in 1971.

Marcel C. LaFollette, an independent scholar, historian and Smithsonian volunteer uncovered these rare, previously unpublished photographs of the 1925 Tennessee v. John Scopes "Monkey Trial" in the Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA). In 2005, SIA restored fifty-two of the negatives with funds granted by the Smithsonian Women's Committee. Included here are thirty-nine of the images. All of these thirty-nine Science Service photographs were taken by Watson Davis, Managing Editor of Science Service, while he was in Dayton, Tennessee, June 4-5, 1925, and July 10-22, 1925. LaFollette identified and dated each of these images, and has published a new book highlighting these and other images from the trial entitled, Reframing Scopes: Journalists, Scientists, and Lost Photographs from the Trial of the Century, University Press of Kansas, 2008.

Also included are two other groups of images: 1) Portraits of scientists who served as witnesses for the defense in the Scopes Trial taken from the Science Service morgue file; and 2) Donated images taken by William Silverman, a nineteen-year-old business administration major at the Georgia Institute of Technology who went to Dayton, Tennessee, with his former high school science teacher to observe the Scopes trial. Silverman's ten candid photos reflect both a young person’s interest in the famous personalities and recognition of the drama taking place during the trial’s last days. These snapshots add new views of Dayton during the trial.

To learn more about archives and the Smithsonian's history, visit THE BIGGER PICTURE. To view more collections from the Smithsonian, visit the Collection Search Center.

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noctuatua says:

Thank you Thank you Thank you
Posted 90 months ago. ( permalink )

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Mary M Bennett says:

What a gift from the Smithsonian. Thanks.

Here we are again in the USA dealing with evolution and the government separation from religion. We are lucky the founders of this country included the 2nd amendment when they wrote the constitution
Posted 90 months ago. ( permalink )

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kevus says:

Oh man, Bucky is going to be really pissed!
Posted 90 months ago. ( permalink )

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sandhillcat63 says:

Uhh...Mary?
The second amendment is the right to bear arms.
The first amendment guarantees freedom of religion, not its removal from public discourse.
Posted 90 months ago. ( permalink )

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Jody Collins says:

Thank you so much for posting these!
Posted 87 months ago. ( permalink )

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grace*c* says:

Thanks for sharing such a valuable collection online! Fantastic history, fantastic photos.
Posted 85 months ago. ( permalink )

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The Brokaw Girls says:

Do we have permission to use these images free?
If so, who do I contact to be sure? I want to use them, with proper credits, in my public access program about the Scopes Trial.
Posted 85 months ago. ( permalink )

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Smithsonian Institution says:

You are welcome to use these for personal and non-commercial use. If you feel like sharing your project with us, please drop us a Flickr mail. Enjoy!
Posted 85 months ago. ( permalink )

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George says:

Photography changes our perspective on historical events
click.si.edu/Story.aspx?story=418
Posted 76 months ago. ( permalink )

shans55 [deleted] says:

Awesome picture, Thanks for sharing. If you want to upload your picture or post your link to,

www.fourpxdirectory.com
Posted 69 months ago. ( permalink )

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Smithsonian Institution says:

The story of how the Smithsonian Institution Archives received some of the images in this set is profiled in the New York Times.

Read more here:
www.nytimes.com/2011/03/17/arts/design/smithsonian-expand...

Best,
Catherine Shteynberg
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Posted 60 months ago. ( permalink )

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