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Pinci, Michele Arthur Kennedy (1923-1944) | by sherborneschoolarchives
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Pinci, Michele Arthur Kennedy (1923-1944)

Sherborne School, UK, Book of Remembrance for former pupils who died in the Second World War, 1939-1945.

 

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Credit: Sherborne School Archives, Abbey Road, Sherborne, Dorset, UK, DT9 3AP.

 

Details: Michele Arthur Kennedy Pinci (1923-1944), born in Reading, Berkshire on 13 June 1923, son of Count Mario Fausto Maria Pinci (1896-1987) and Countess Gwendoline Pinci (née Kennedy), of 14 Rue La Fayette, Paris, France.

 

Attended Lambrook School, Bracknell.

 

Attended Sherborne School (School House) May 1937-December 1939.

 

Worked for De Haviland Aircraft Ltd.

 

WW2, Lieutenant, 2nd Special Air Service Regiment (SAS), A.A.C. Operation Wallace – killed on 11 September 1944, aged 21, by an Allied fighter-bomber sweep while patrolling in a civilian car at Plateau de Longres, France.

 

Commemorated at:

Clichy Northern Cemetery, Hauts-de-Seine, France, Plot 16. Row 13. Grave 13. Inscription on his headstone: ‘WHEN CAN THEIR GLORY FADE?’ www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2235186/pinci,-michel...

 

David Stirling Memorial (SAS Memorial), Doune, Perthshire.

 

The Allied Special Forces Memorial Grove, National Memorial Arboretum.

 

Sherborne School: War Memorial Staircase; Book of Remembrance.

 

Obituary in 'The Shirburnian', December 1944: 'Had Michele Pinci been at Sherborne for more than two short years he might well have been remembered for his football: but even so his place was secure in the esteem and liking of the narrower circle who knew him well. Living in France and almost bilingual, his outlook could be unusual and refreshing, but essentially his character, especially its keen sense of humour, was as English as anything could be. Leaving early he worked with an aircraft firm till his time came to serve; he then did most valuable liaison work, for which his special gifts made him eminently qualified. Killed in September 1944, he was a faithful son of the two countries in which he lived.'

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Taken on August 1, 2013