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Evans, David (1913-1942) | by sherborneschoolarchives
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Evans, David (1913-1942)

Sherborne School, UK, Book of Remembrance for former pupils who died in the Second World War, 1939-1945.

 

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Credit: Sherborne School Archives, Abbey Road, Sherborne, Dorset, UK, DT9 3AP.

 

Details: David Evans (1913-1942), born 27 August 1913, son of John Herbert Evans and Margaret Evelyn Evans, of London (formerly of Tramore, Birchwood Road, Parkstone, Dorset).

 

Attended Dane Court Preparatory School, Parkstone, Dorset.

 

Attended Sherborne School (Lyon House) January 1928-July 1932; 6th form; Prefect; Head of House; Fletcher French prize, 1932; 1st XI cricket team, 1930, 1931, 1932.

 

Articled to chartered accountant.

 

Played for Dorset XI 1932-1934.

 

WW2, Lieutenant in the Dorsetshire Regiment, attached 5th Battalion, King's African Rifles. Awarded the Military Cross. Killed in action at Fianarantsoa, Madagascar, on 2 November 1942, aged 29.

 

Commemorated at:

Diego Suarez War Cemetery, Madagascar, 2. A. 8 www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2223594/evans,-david/

 

Sherborne School: War Memorial Staircase; Book of Remembrance; Lyon House War Memorial.

 

Obituary, 'The Shirburnian', March 1943: 'Lieutenant (Temp. Captain) David Evans, Dorsetshire Regiment, attached King's African Rifles (g 1928-32). David Evans came to Sherborne in 1928. He was Head of his House, in the School Cricket XI for three years, and winner of the Fletcher French Prize. He was shot by a sniper in Madagascar two hours before the Armistice was arranged. He had been awarded the Military Cross a few months previously. "He set a splendid example by carrying a load of mortar bombs all day, by gallantly keeping his mortar in action against the enemy tanks until they were within two hundred yards and finally by assisting an Askari with a broken leg for three miles under heavy fire." He was buried on a hill-top as dusk was falling, and his friends "were glad of the gathering darkness... as the bugles sounded the Last Post." His many friends will remember, both at School and on Pilgrims' Cricket tours, his wonderfully happy disposition. But it hid something more, an exceptional capacity for taking pains. Before he died, he had nearly completed a very full dossier of each of the eighty natives under his immediate control, with a full record of their doings, their capacity and the personal troubles and problems of each. No wonder he had been called "the most beloved Officer in his battalion."

 

His housemaster, A.H. Trelawny-Ross, wrote in the Lyon House newsletter (July 1943): 'Capt. David Evans, Dorset Regiment, attached King's African Rifles (1928-32). He was Head of the House, in the School Cricket XI for three years and winner of the Fletcher French Prize. He won the M.C. when "he set a splendid example.. keeping his mortar in action against enemy tanks till they were within two hundred yards and finally assisting an Askari with a broken leg for three miles under heavy fire." He was killed by a sniper in Madagascar a few days before the armistice. He was buried on a hill-top when dusk was falling. "He was the most beloved officer in his battalion." I last saw him when he and David Shirreff came over from Dorchester one summer afternoon, both vigorous, strong, talented. Off they went, gay and eager, having volunteered for service in Africa. Both won the M.C., and they were together when he was killed. On a hill in Madagascar is a spot "that is for ever England."

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Taken on August 1, 2013