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Bannerman, Douglas Edward (1917-1944) | by sherborneschoolarchives
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Bannerman, Douglas Edward (1917-1944)

Sherborne School, UK, Book of Remembrance for former pupils who died in the Second World War, 1939-1945.

 

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Credit: Sherborne School Archives, Abbey Road, Sherborne, Dorset, UK, DT9 3AP.

 

Details: Douglas Edward Bannerman (1917-1944), born 26 January 1917, son of Edward M. Bannerman and Jean Bannerman of Rock, Wadebridge, Cornwall.

 

Attended Rottingdean School.

 

Attended Sherborne School (Lyon House) January 1931-July 1934.

 

WW2, Lieutenant, 9th Bn. Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).. Killed in action in Italy on 22 January 1944, aged 26.

 

Commemorated at:

Minturno War Cemetery, Italy, VIII, H, 12 www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2633776/BANNERMAN,%20...

 

Sherborne School: War Memorial Staircase; Book of Remembrance; Lyon House roll of honour.

 

His housemaster, A.H. Trelawny-Ross, wrote in the Lyon House letter (July 1944): 'Lt. Douglas Edward Bannerman (1931-34), Royal Fusiliers, was killed in action in Italy early this year. He came to Sherborne from Rottingdean in 1931 and was here for nearly four years. A fine natural athlete and an exceptionally good golfer, he was by no means without artistic feeling and his pleasing disposition won him many friends. He gave unstinted help to the boys at Southwark when he was working in London with the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, and with John Muriel he was a keen Territorial. On the outbreak of war they both joined the Royal Fusiliers, but after a time were separated, though both fought in Italy. It was there that he was killed, and many will be saddened by the news, for in his short life he had contributed much to the common good.'

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Taken on August 1, 2013