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Simmons, Frank Wortley (1888-1917) | by sherborneschoolarchives
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Simmons, Frank Wortley (1888-1917)

Sherborne School, UK, Book of Remembrance for former pupils who died in the First World War, 1914-1918.

 

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Credit: Sherborne School Archives, Abbey Road, Sherborne, Dorset, UK, DT9 3AP.

 

Details: Frank Wortley Simmons (1888-1917), born 15 February 1888, eldest son of Charles Franklin Simmons, JP, CC, and Mary Alexander Simmons of Eastrop Fields, Basingstoke, Hampshire; brother of Paul Emery May Simmons (1893-1915) www.flickr.com/photos/sherborneschoolarchives/9339757101/...

 

Attended Weymouth College.

 

Attended Sherborne School (Abbeylands) September 1901-April 1906; 6th form. Took part in the 1905 Sherborne Pageant www.flickr.com/photos/sherborneschoolarchives/15355367973...

 

Qualified as a professional associate of the Surveyors' Institute; in 1911 passed his final examination as a fellow of the Surveyors' Institution, although too young to qualify formally.

1 January 1911, became a partner of the firm of Messrs. Simmons and Sons, auctioneers and estate agents of Henley, Reading and Basingstoke.

 

1911, appointed assistant secretary of the Royal Counties Agricultural Society, of which his father was secretary, and in 1912 was made secretary of the Basingstoke Root and Stock Show Society, on the resignation of his father after 25 years' service.

 

Honorary Secretary of the Berks and Oxon Chambers of Agriculture.

 

Assistant Secretary of Royal Counties Agricultural Society.

 

WW1, Captain in the Hampshire Regiment. In August 1914 joined the O.T.C. Camp, Salisbury Plain, and was commissioned to 2/4th Bn. (T.), Hampshire Regiment. December 1914, went to India with his Battalion. September 1915, promoted Captain at Quetta. April 1919, went to Egypt, and then to Palestine. He was killed on 22 November 1917, aged 29, at Nebi Samwil during an attack on Jerusalem.

 

Commemorated at:

Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel, K. 81 www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/648130/SIMMONS,%20FRA...

 

Basingstoke War Memorial www.ipernity.com/doc/286273/24478821.

 

Church of St Michael, Basingstoke: memorial window in memory of F.W. Simmons and P.E.M. Simmons. One of the panels represents St Ealdhelm and below it is a picture of Sherborne School.

 

Reading University College First World War Memorial www.flickr.com/photos/reading_connections/9414779228/in/p....

 

Sherborne School: War Memorial Staircase; Book of Remembrance; no.26 memorial pew in the School chapel; Abbeylands roll of honour. C.F. Simmons and Mrs Simmons donated £50 towards the Sherborne School War Memorial in memory of their sons, Capt. P.E.M. Simmons and F.W. Simmons.

 

Obituary, The Shirburnian, December 1917: 'CAPTAIN FRANK WORTLEY SIMMONS, Hampshire Regiment, killed on November 22nd, aged 29, was the eldest son of Mr C. Franklin Simmons, J.P., C.C., of Eastrop Fields, Basingstoke. He was educated at Sherborne, and afterwards entered his father's profession, qualifying as a professional associate of the Surveyors' Institute. On January 1st, 1911, he became a partner of the firm of Messrs. Simmons & Sons, auctioneers and estate agents, of Henley, Reading, and Basingstoke, and in the same year, passed the final examination as a fellow of the Surveyors' Institution, although too young to qualify formally. In 1911 he was appointed assistant secretary of the Royal Counties Agricultural Society, of which his father is secretary, and a year later was made secretary of the Basingstoke Root and Stock Show Society, on the resignation of his father after 25 years' service. He was also honorary secretary of the Berks and Oxon Chamber of Agriculture. He secured a commission in the Hampshire Regiment soon after the war broke out, and went to India with his regiment, being promoted to Captain when at Quetta in September 1915. He went to the front early this year.'

 

The following letter from a 'Brother Officer' appeared in 'The Field': 'Sir, In your issue of December 8th last there is an obituary notice of Captain F.W. Simmons, Hampshire Regiment, giving some account of his activities in the agricultural world. Should you be able to spare the space, I would like to supplement your notice with a few words concerning his military side. As his brother officer for the last three years in India and Egypt, I was in a position, peculiarly well suited, to form some estimate of his work and character. It is difficult to conceive a more useful regimental officer. A natural power of command was united to ability and quick decision. He was beloved by his men, and I shall not forget the form in which this was expressed on one occasion. We were in bivouac, preparatory to a long and arduous march through desert country up to the front. In the cold dawn Simmons returned from down country, just as the hurry of preparation for the start began. He came striding over the hill, and as he drew near, his company recognised their leader, returning at the nick of time, and spontaneously burst into rounds of cheers. An unrehearsed effect, but I for one felt how much it meant. It takes a lot to make Englishmen so demonstrative. A few months later he fell, at the head of his men, within sight of Jerusalem.'

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Taken on July 22, 2013