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Goldsmith, Henry Mills (1885-1915) | by sherborneschoolarchives
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Goldsmith, Henry Mills (1885-1915)

Sherborne School, UK, Book of Remembrance for former pupils who died in the First World War, 1914-1918.

 

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Credit: Sherborne School Archives, Abbey Road, Sherborne, Dorset, UK, DT9 3AP.

 

Details: Henry Mills Goldsmith (1885-1915), born 22 July 1885 at Compton Gifford, Plymouth. Second son of John Philip Goldsmith (solicitor) and Elizabeth Goldsmith (nee Mills) of 1 St Michael's Terrace, Devonport.

Husband of Sybil Elizabeth Goldsmith (daughter of W. King Perrens of Wilnecot, Torquay) of Rockmoor, Yelverton, Devon; father of Elizabeth Joan Goldsmith (born August 1915).

 

Attended Garfield House Preparatory School, Devonport.

 

Attended Sherborne School (School House) September 1899-August 1904.

 

Attended Jesus College, Cambridge; in 1906 President Cambridge University Boat Club and rowed for the Cambridge University Boat team in 1906 and 1907, and against Harvard in 1906. A member of the rowing Eights who won a bronze medal for Great Britain at the 1908 Summer Olympics en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rowing_at_the_1908_Summer_Olympics. In 1911 was Captain of the Jesus College boat, which won the International race at Terdonck Regatta, Belgium.

 

In 1909 joined the 5th (Territorial) Battalion, Devonshire Regiment.

 

WW1, appointed A.D.C. to the General Commanding the Wessex Division, promoted in December 1910 to Lieutenant, in February 1915 transferred to the 3rd Battalion Devonshire Regiment. Went to the front in March 1915 and was attached to the 2nd Lincolnshire Regiment and appointed Machine Gun Officer to the headquarters of the 25th Brigade.

Killed in action near Fromelles during the Battle of Aubers on 9 May 1915, aged 29.

 

Commemorated at:

Ploegsteert Memorial, panel 3 www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/873231/GOLDSMITH,%20H...

 

Jesus College, Cambridge www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/college/about-us/history/first-world-...

 

Sherborne School: War Memorial Staircase; Book of Remembrance.

 

The Granta, 13 October 1906:

'MR H.M. GOLDSMITH, JESUS COLLEGE, PRESIDENT C.U.B.C.

The 22nd of July 1885, is the first date which we can rescue from the mists of antiquity. Its roseate hues ushered our hero into the world. From that day till he went to Mr Walker’s school, at Stoke, his doings are shrouded with mystery, self-imposed. There cricket claimed him as a victim, and a predilection for coming out top led him to captain the football team.

In 1899 he went to Sherborne, where he was known familiarly as ‘Harry’ and divided his prowess between the Digby preserves and the football field. Eventually the latter proved less nervous work, and he played for his house and the 2nd XV. Even at Sherborne he showed decided literary leanings, and was known to be the proud possessor of one book. Now he has two. He was a member of a highly select club. Its very name was kept a secret from the vulgar. Its initiation ceremony was an ordeal.

In 1904 he came up to Cambridge with his library. But the prophetic eye of Mr Fairbairn singled him out at once, and laid the foundation for a successful rowing career. Thus his literary career was interrupted by rowing in the Jesus First Lent and May Boats. In October 1905 he got his Trial cap. Unfortunately he was prevented by illness from rowing at Henley in the summer.

In 1906 he won his Blue and was elected President of the C.U.B.C. in the Easter Term. Jesus College have not had a President for twenty years.

At Henley this year he was unsuccessful for the same reason that many rowing men are unsuccessful, viz., that the other crews were too strong. But the Cambridge crew that under his presidency beat Harvard, and the speech that he made at the dinner, have not those things appeared in the papers? Yet the tact he showed in the negotiations with Harvard, and the way his genial presence inspired the crew in the sweltering heat of Bourne End and Putney, these things are not recorded.

He once had a pocket terrier. But it grew into a mastiff of sorts.'

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Taken on July 22, 2013