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Clatworthy, Thomas Eland (1886-1916) | by sherborneschoolarchives
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Clatworthy, Thomas Eland (1886-1916)

Sherborne School, UK, Book of Remembrance for former pupils who died in the First World War, 1914-1918.

 

If you have any additional information about this individual, or if you use one of our images, we would love to hear from you. Please leave a comment below or contact us via the Sherborne School Archives website: oldshirburnian.org.uk/school-archives/contact-the-school-...

 

Credit: Sherborne School Archives, Abbey Road, Sherborne, Dorset, UK, DT9 3AP.

 

Details: Thomas Eland Clatworthy (1886-1916), born 22 May 1886, son of Eland Clatworthy (1849-1940), ironmonger and breeder of South Devon cattle, and Mary Jane Clatworthy (nee Bailey) (1850-1895) of Cutsey House, Trull, Taunton, formerly of Highland Villa, Taunton, Somerset.

 

Attended Messrs Alston and Rawes preparatory school, Taunton.

 

Attended Sherborne School (Abbey House) January 1899-July 1901.

 

Occupation: in business.

 

WW1, 2nd Lieutenant in the 37th Dogras, Indian Army. Killed in Mesopotamia on 6 January 1916.

 

Commemorated at:

Basra Memorial, Panel 43 and 65 www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1659929/CLATWORTHY,%2...

 

Taunton War Memorial and the Trull War Memorial wendys-questionable-public-musings.blogspot.co.uk/2011/12...

 

Sherborne School: War Memorial Staircase; Book of Remembrance; Abbey House roll of honour. E. Clatworthy and Mrs E. Clatworthy donated towards the Sherborne School War Memorial in memory of 2nd. Lieut. T.B. Clatworthy.

 

The following is extracted from letter originally written by Lieutenant Goodland to Thomas Clatworthy’s parents: ‘...On January 5th our cavalry scouts came in touch with the enemy. We knew that very soon the infantry would be in action. Early the next day (the day of Tom‘s death) we marched out of bivouac and I waved Tom a greeting, this was the last I saw of him. We were soon advancing in extended order against very heavy shrapnel fire. The 37th were on the left, we were on the right, the 102nd in support, and the 97th in reserve. We were unable to make much headway and I afterwards heard that whilst lying down with his Company Commander, and waiting for the next opportunity to advance, a shell burst over the left wing of our front line killing Tom and wounding his C.O. I think Tom must have died immediately, as the shrapnel bullet entered his forehead. I am sure he did not live to suffer for any length of time. He was buried on the field of battle, a spot on the left of the bank of the Tigris, midway between Ali Garbhi and Shaikh Sa’ad, a soldier‘s grave...’

 

His obituary appeared in the Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 21 January 1916: 'Mr Eland Clatworthy, of Cutsey Hall, Taunton, the well-known breeder of Devon Cattle, has received official intimation from the India Office that his son, Sec. Lieut. Thomas Eland Clatworthy, was killed in action between the 6th and 8th January, in the Persian Gulf. Lieut. Clatworthy, who was 30 years of age, joined the 5th Somerset L.I. soon after the outbreak of war, and went to India with the 1-5th Battalion. At Ambala he was given a commission in the Indian Army, and attached to the 37th Dogras. He saw his first service in the field on the north-western frontier of Afghanistan in the quelling of tribal disturbances, and subsequently he went with 18,000 troops to Buzra, in the north of the Persian Gulf. The last letter received by his father was dated December 8th in which he stated: "An Arab pilot has come aboard to enable us to navigate the river. He brings wild reports of reinforcements for the Turks of Germans and Bulgars. We shall meet them in a few days." Lieut. Clatworthy was an Old Boy of Sherborne School, and before the war was in partnership with his father. He was very popular in Taunton, and had a wide circle of friends.'

 

An obituary appeared in an unidentified Taunton newspaper: 'GALLANT TAUNTON OFFICER KILLED. SECOND-LIEUTENANT T.E. CLATWORTHY. It was with feelings of deep regret that Tauntonians heard on Monday of the death of Second-Lieutenant Thomas Eland Clatworthy, eldest son of Mr Eland Clatworthy, of Cutsey Hall, Trull, and High-street, Taunton. Lieutenant Clatworthy was thirty years of age, and immensely popular with a wide circle of friends. He joined the 5th Somerset L.I. soon after the outbreak of war, and was with the first detachment to be sent on foreign service. In India he was for a time stationed at Ambala, and while there he was given a commission in the Indian Army, and attached to the 37th Dogras. He went with his Company to the North-Western Frontier of Afghanistan to assist in quelling disturbances among the frontier tribes, and subsequently, with 18,000 troops embarked at Karachi and sailed to Buzra, in the north of the Persian Gulf. The last letter his father received from him was on December 8th, in which he stated: "An Arab pilot has come on board to enable us to navigate the river. He brings wild reports of reinforcements for the Turks of Germans and Bulgars. We shall meet them in a few days." On Sunday morning Mr Clatworthy received the following telegram from the Military Secretary of the India Office: "Deeply regret to state your son Second-Lieutenant T.E. Clatworthy, Indian Army Reserve of Officers, attached 37th Dogras, officially reported from Persian Gulf killed in action between the 6th and 8th of January. Mr Secretary Chamberlain desires to express sincere sympathy with you in the loss of this gallant officer." Lieutenant Clatworthy was educated at Sherborne School and went into partnership with his father in June 1909. He was an only son by Mr Clatworthy's first wife. His father is president of the Trull Rifle Club, who are indebted to him for one of the finest ranges in the county. It is hardly necessary to add that Mr Clatworthy is one of the best known breeders of Devon cattle in the West of England.'

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Taken on July 22, 2013