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Duvall, John Richard (1888-1917) | by sherborneschoolarchives
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Duvall, John Richard (1888-1917)

Sherborne School, UK, Book of Remembrance for former pupils who died in the First World War, 1914-1918.

 

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Credit: Sherborne School Archives, Abbey Road, Sherborne, Dorset, UK, DT9 3AP.

 

Details: John Richard Duvall (1888-1917), born 17 December 1888 at Culford, Suffolk. Only son of John William Duvall and Anna Duvall (nee Wright), of The Grange, Walton Road, Ware, Hertfordshire.

 

Attended Cliff House preparatory school, Southbourne.

 

Attended Sherborne School (Abbey House) September 1902-August 1906; scholar; 6th form. Took part in the 1905 Sherborne Pageant www.flickr.com/photos/sherborneschoolarchives/15974327312...

 

Attended Selwyn College, Cambridge; 2nd class Theology, 1911.

 

Attended Ely Theological College; ordained 1912. First curacy at Liverpool.

 

September 1914, Tutor and later Vice-Principal of St Boniface College, Warminster.

 

WW1, Reverend Captain, Chaplain to the 66th Brigade; attached to 13th Manchesters, 12th Cheshires 7th Wiltshires. Obtained a Chaplaincy in the Army in July 1915; served with the Expeditionary Force in France in 1915 and then in Salonika 1915-1917. Mentioned in despatches for gallant and distinguished service in the field. Died in Salonika of wounds received in action on 6 October 1917. Buried at Basili, Macedonia.

 

Commemorated at:

Sarigol Military Cemetery, Kriston, C. 443 www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/331775/DUVALL,%20The%...

 

Sherborne School: War Memorial Staircase; Book of Remembrance; Abbey House roll of honour.

 

His Colonel wrote: 'He considered it his duty to share the men's dangers, and that by so doing he could perform his religious duties much better. He was already beloved by every officer and man in my battalion, and there is no doubt that, by his very gallant death in charge of the forward stretcher-bearers, he has set an example which every officer and man in the battalion is anxious to follow. Personally, though I had only known him for six weeks, I feel I have lost a genuine friend and an absolutely fearless padre.'

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Taken on July 22, 2013