mesopotamia, iraq - sumerian figure

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    Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC.

    Standing male worshiper, 2750-2600 B.C.
    Mesopotamia, Eshnunna (modern Tell Asmar)
    Alabaster (gypsum), shell, black limestone, bitumen; H. 29.5 cm
    Fletcher Fund, 1940 (40.156)

    In Mesopotamia gods were thought to be physically present in the materials and experiences of daily life. Enlil, considered the most powerful Mesopotamian god during most of the third millennium B.C., was a "raging storm" or "wild bull," while the goddess Inanna reappeared in different guises as the morning and evening star. Deities literally inhabited their cult statues after they had been animated by the proper rituals, and fragments of worn statues were preserved within the walls of the temple.

    This standing figure, with clasped hands and a wide-eyed gaze, is a worshiper. It was placed in the "Square Temple" at Tell Asmar, perhaps dedicated to the god Abu, in order to pray perpetually on behalf of the person it represented. For humans equally were considered to be physically present in their statues. Similar statues were sometimes inscribed with the names of rulers and their families.

    Nick . Brooks, shankargallery, and 23 other people added this photo to their favorites.

    1. hua bing chong ji [deleted] 100 months ago | reply

      Is this a recent acquisition?

    2. Xuan Che 100 months ago | reply

      Seems not. According to the notes it was acquired in 1940. I think Iraq Museum should have one that resembles this.

    3. evrimnazli 84 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Mesopotamia, and we'd love to have your photo added to the group. Thank you :)

    4. lamusediffuse 84 months ago | reply

      Thank you for sharing this photo at Museum of Iraq 2.0

    5. LeszekZadlo 77 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called 100 + Viewed Best Archaeology & Ruins Photos (add 1, award 1), and we'd love to have your photo added to the group.

      This is an invitation for all Your archaeology & ruins photos viewed 100 times or more.

    6. gipas76 75 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called civiltà sepolte, and we'd love to have your photo added to the group.

    7. Hans Ollermann 61 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Masterworks in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York., and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    8. Hans Ollermann 49 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Civilizations of the Ancient Near East, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    9. mikedarnell1974 43 months ago | reply

      Thanks for this amazing photo!
      I used it in my presentation: "Inviting Guests to your BNI chapter" - kpis.co/2010/10/14/inviting-guests-to-your-bni-chapter
      The photo links back to this page :)

      Mike Darnell
      KPIs.co - The Key Performance Indicator blog
      : )

    10. jrodrigu34 32 months ago | reply

      correct me if I am wrong, but I thought this figure is 76.2 cm. The reason I ask is because I am writing an essay on these figures, and I want to know the actual high.

    11. Xuan Che 32 months ago | reply

      Hello thanks for writing me. I believe the statue is 29.5 cm high. You can check it out on the Met's official page: www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/40.156

    12. mlhradio 28 months ago | reply

      Congratulations on receiving more than 25,000 views -- that's quite impressive! Now that you've reached this milestone, you might want to consider graduating this photograph from the 'Views: 10000' group to the 'Views: 25,000' group, which can be found here: www.flickr.com/groups/views25000/

      Once again, congratulations and hopefully your photos will receive many more views in the future! Reminder: Photos should only be in one 'Views:xx' group at a time. (This is an automatic message posted to all items in the 'Views: 10000' group that receive more than 25,000 views. There is no need to reply to this message.)

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