• The pons (bridge) which connects the cerebrum to the corresponding cerebellum on the other half is also considered to be a part of the brainstem.
  • The front part (genu is Latin for knee because that's what it looks like) of the corpus callosum which connects the two halves of my brain together.

    This allows me to think whole thoughts and not just half baked ideas ;)
  • This is my thalamus through which most of the nerve connections to and from different parts of my cerebral cortex pass.

    In addition it is a gatekeeper, determining which parts of the flood of sensory inputs get to the cortex, and is thus involved in the regulation of sleep, alertness and attention. It is probably part of, the mechanism of consciousness.
  • The cerebellum's role is the fine coordination of movement.
  • The primary visual cortex is at the back of my head and is the first brain area to process signals from the retina.
  • A sinus cavity. This one is the frontal sinus.
  • Another sinus. This one is the sphenoid.
  • the spinal cord
  • A suture in the skull, which is where the bones surrounding the baby's soft spot fuse firmly together in the adult.
  • The hard palette (the roof) of my mouth.
  • My epiglottis keeps me from choking to death every time I eat or drink something.
  • Even men have an uvula, so it's probably not what you may be thinking it is. It hangs off of the soft palette and cartoonists like to draw it.
  • My pituitary gland (or hypophysis) sits here. This is the master endocrine gland that controls most hormone producing cells in the body.
  • This should be my optic chiasma, the point where 1/2 of each optic nerve crosses the mid-line to end up on the other side.
  • the pineal gland is here. It coordinates the daily and seasonal rhythms of the body.
  • The mammillary bodies are involved with the processing of recognition memory and smell recollection.
  • Here is the medulla oblongata, a part of the brain stem, which contains the cardiac, respiratory, vomiting and vasomotor centers and deals with autonomic functions, such as breathing, heart rate and blood pressure. Be careful of mine please.
  • Folded up wrinkles of muscle, fat and skin. I was effectively hunching in the MRI while laying on my back.
  • This is the cerebral aqueduct, and below it the 4th ventricle - full of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).
  • This area is part of the third ventricle, itself a part of the ventricular system within the human brain. It is full of CSF and surrounds the two thalamic halves.
  • One of the disks in the cervical part of my spine.
  • This is my hypothalamus. It links the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland (hypophysis).
  • Part of the choroid plexus hanging in my 3rd ventricle which produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that cushions my brain and fills the ventricles. 500 ml/day is produced but it needs to fit into a 135 to 150 ml space, so it must be continuously reabsorbed.
  • The nucleus accumbens is thought to play an important role in reward, laughter, pleasure, addiction, fear and the placebo effect
  • This whole thickness is part of my cerebrum (also known as the telencephalon). Contrast this with the cerebellum, at the bottom right.
  • My tongue of course.
  • The habenula is the stalk of the pineal gland. Habenular nuclei (neural bodies) have been shown to be involved in many functions, including pain processing, reproductive behavior, nutrition, sleep-wake cycles, stress responses, learning, and negative feedback/negative rewards.
  • This is part of my fornix which carries signals from my hippocampus to my mammillary bodies
  • This shows the thickness of my cingulate cortex. Cingulum means belt in Latin and it surrounds my corpus callosum

Annotated Sagittal T1 Midline MRI Scan of Reigh's Brain

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The same shot as the previous one in my photostream, except this one is labelled using Flickr notes. If you can't see them click on the photo to make sure you are on its individual page and then hover your mouse over the image for a bit.

For those misguided people who are 'doctoring' themselves...a note on variation. The gross physical structure of each brain can be strikingly different between people - while still being quite normal! Don't be at all concerned if the gyri and sulci (the ridges and grooves of the folds of the surface) don't match yours, or if the size of my thalamus and the shape of my corpus callosum are different from yours.

technovore, drjmedulla, sz1125, and 8 other people added this photo to their favorites.

  1. xxcorixx 56 months ago | reply

    So, I hope you don't mind, but I sort of used a picture of your brain during a presentation for my Psychology class.
    It was a great visual aid.

    :)

  2. Reigh LeBlanc 56 months ago | reply

    of course not. glad to be able to help.

    Reigh

  3. loveablelevi1 24 months ago | reply

    Hi,
    I have used your pic on my blog. Hope that's ok?
    coldteaandsmellynappies.blogspot.co.uk/

  4. Reigh LeBlanc 24 months ago | reply

    of course not. glad to be able to contribute to your content.

    Reigh

  5. periphericphotos 23 months ago | reply

    Hello,
    I'm using this photo as the icon on my science blog. I've cited you and linked back to this page in the footnote. Let me know if that's not okay or if you want me to modify my citation.
    Thanks!

  6. MelissaCCheung 18 months ago | reply

    Hi Reigh,

    This is a great photo! I hope it is ok if I use it in my latest blog post on how researchers discovered that learning a new language makes parts of your brain bigger (I was sure to cite you and link back to your photo). It’ll be up on October 17th.

    My blog is called Real Research, Real Simple and explains research in fun, everyday language. Here's the link if you'd like to check it out (I write the blog for Sunnybrook Research Hospital in Toronto – I see we’re both in that general region of Canada):

    realresearchrealsimple.sunnybrook.ca/

    Thanks!
    Melissa

  7. emuriel 11 months ago | reply

    Hi! I liked you photo and I will use shortly in a new post about the brain in my blog: www.enriquemuriel.com (spanish). Thank you!

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