Carliol House

Dated 1927, Carliol House was originally the headquarters of NESCo, the Newcastle Electric Supply Company. It faces the magistrate's court, police and fire station, also in Portland stone. These were designed by Robert Burns Dick who was responsible for many of Newcastle's significant 20th century buildings. His are the towers either end of the Tyne Bridge, as is the 11-storey building, once the Northumberland County Council Offices; now the Vermont Hotel whose rear is visible under the viaduct at the bottom of Dean Street.

1975doods faved this
  • Doug PRO 7y

    looks good, there are loads of interesting buildings in the town. interesting history too.
  • Dave Webster PRO 7y

    Thanks for this - I'd forgotten about Carliol House although used to go there with my mum in the days when people paid their electricity bills face to face. Once went back to see the IT people on one of the upper floors as Northern Electric had an ICL mainframe.

    Had no idea the architect was the same as the Tyne Bridge towers.
  • Paul J White PRO 7y

    Aye, the 'leccy building as we of a certain age know it ;-)

    I must research the architect a bit, as that was from a very quick google. I do love the subtle curve on it - very Art Deco, but easy to miss from ground level.
  • DoUBleMoVEmeNt 7y

    I've been looking art this thinking how to get a nice shot. You've got a good eye mate!
  • Paul J White PRO 7y

    Thanks! There's a lot of low level tat and street furniture - it really needed to be cropped above that level. I was lucky with the sky, having just bought a polarizing filter ten minutes before ;-)
  • bryan jones 7y

    fantasticbuilding/photo paul
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Taken on October 21, 2008
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