Adult Male Habronattus cognatus Jumping spider

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I apologize for the lack of posts lately - I've been quite busy. Rest assured, big news (don't get your hopes up just yet - just be thinking "NG") and more shots are on their way! For now, check out some of my more recent artwork:


Here's an old shot from last last May that I originally turned down in favor for this shot. I realize this type of shot may not be a big hit, but in retrospect, I prefer this composition despite the decreased magnification and hidden chelicerae. Here's the original text that accompanied the last post:




Several weeks ago, I photographed an interesting looking female Habronattus at a spot near the Canadian River I visit frequently to look for tiger beetles. She looked quite different than the usual female H. coecatus specimens I can find relatively easily around Oklahoma, so I've been having high hopes I finding a new Habronattus male species every time I head out to the spot.


So, my persistence payed off, and after a rather unsuccessful afternoon of stalking the larger tiger beetles near the river, I spotted this little guy (~4mm) as he was watching a large caterpillar wiggle its way across the sandy path. I was exhausted and didn't feel like chasing him around in the sand, so I let him hop in a jar I had with me and took him on home.


Although not as flashy as some of the Habronattus species in the U.S., this little male H. cognatus is handsome in his own right - I love those intermittent, mottled scales on his chelicerae. He wasn't in the best cosmetic shape (missing scales/worn) but proved to be quite a lively and active spider that would only slow down when partially covered by the leaves I collected and set out to photograph him on. During the next bug-hunt, I released him at the excact same spot where I found him.


If you are interested in the Habronattus genus (you really should be) make sure to take a look at tolweb's entry here:




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Taken on May 5, 2010