Nineteen minutes past 11 o'clock

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    Love when our photos clearly show the time, and that's the case with this great capture of St. Patrick's Hill in Cork City...

    Thanks to guliolopez who did so much work on Barriscale's Jewellers and Watchmakers at no. 5 Bridge Street, whose lovely clock shows to great effect in this photo. Read all about them below.

    Really lovely also to hear from achesonblog that the business at no. 4, William McNay, was his great great grandfather's. William lived from 1835 to 1916. McNay's was a boot shop, and remained in the family until the 1940s.

    Delighted to hear from Barriscalefamily who said:
    "My Great grandfather was William Barriscale who owned the shop and I believe it stayed open until the early 1940's. I have tried to find where the clock went as far as I can ascertain it was donated to the African missions and is lost. Richard emigrated to Canada and continued to work their as an optician."

    We were absolutely delighted also to hear from grantlandon who said:
    "My family owned Landons Printing Works and Book Factory which was at number 16 from at least 1845 up until some time in the 60s I think. Some of you might even remember it."

    Date: Circa 1900

    NLI Ref.: L_CAB_00814

    Abaraphobia, chloe.sobel, and 64 other people added this photo to their favorites.

    View 20 more comments

    1. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 27 months ago | reply

      Fascinating! Damn the dodgy handwriting on some of the household returns. Who was George ?zenran? for example, very exotic name for Church of Ireland chap from Waterford.

    2. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 27 months ago | reply

      They do seem to alright! Especially this one, with the flat running board...

    3. blackpoolbeach 27 months ago | reply


      George Zinkant and family, house 6 in Wilkin Street (Waterford Urban No. 4, Waterford), 1901 census.
      www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Waterford/Water...

    4. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 27 months ago | reply

      Brilliant! Do you know that there's a mechanism to report errors online? If you had a couple of minutes, you could submit Zinkant as a correction... But don't let it distract you from your "work" here now!

    5. blackpoolbeach 27 months ago | reply

      I am going for a lie down in a dark room.....

    6. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 27 months ago | reply

      Oh alright, you can take this evening off! :D

    7. blackpoolbeach 27 months ago | reply


      Here is a later photo of a chauffeur in a similar uniform.
      www.picturethepast.org.uk/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_in...
      I cannot imagine a bloke wearing a white suit and cap unless it was part of the job.

    8. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 27 months ago | reply

      That magnify widget is very handy, isn't it?
      P.S. Glad to see you're refreshed after your "lie down in a dark room"... :)

    9. achesonblog 26 months ago | reply

      Behind the clock at 4 Bridge Street was the boot shop of my great great grandfather William McNay (1835-1916)

    10. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 26 months ago | reply

      That is amazing! William McNay is clearly visible and I had already tagged with his name. Did the shop stay in the family at all after 1916?

    11. achesonblog 26 months ago | reply

      I believe the shop and home remained in the family until the 1940s. William's son, also named William (1861-1945), continued in the boot business.
      William McNay (1861-1945) seated left:
      www.flickr.com/photos/achesonblog/5034352581/in/set-72157...

    12. achesonblog 26 months ago | reply

      In the first floor window above Twomey's public house on the corner of Coburg Street are the offices of the N.S. & F.U. The National Seamens' and Firemens' Union was a British based union not well thought of by Connolly and others in Irish Labour.

    13. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 26 months ago | reply

      How lovely that you have that photo! William looks like a very dapper gentleman...

    14. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 26 months ago | reply

      And thank you for the info on the N.S. & F.U. While I tagged for that window sign, I hadn't known what the acronym stood for...

    15. Barriscalefamily 26 months ago | reply

      Amazing photograph of the Barriscale shop. My Great grandfather was William Barriscale who owned the shop and I believe it stayed open until the early 1940's. I have tried to find where the clock went as far as I can ascertain it was donated to the African missions and is lost. Richard emigrated to Canada and continued to work their as an optician. Would be very interested to see any other photographs you have in your collection.

    16. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 26 months ago | reply

      How tremendous! Thanks a million for getting in touch. As you can see from the comments above, everyone was fascinated by the Mystery of the Disappearing Clock. guliolopez's father thought it was still there in the 50s/even into the 60s. What do you know about timing (if you'll pardon the pun)? Do you think the clock stayed for some years after the shop itself closed?

      If I come across another photo of your family's shop, I will certainly post them here...

    17. guliolopez 26 months ago | reply

      Smashing! I knew that one of the remaining Cork Barriscale's would shed some light :) Glad to hear that Richard kept the business going after he left Cork. Pity to hear about the uncertain fate of the clock though.

    18. grantlandon 24 months ago | reply

      Fantastic photo and some great comments demonstrating some amazing knowledge of turn of the century Cork. My family owned Landons Printing Works and Book Factory which was at number 16 from at least 1845 up until some time in the 60s I think. Some of you might even remember it. Thanks so much for a truly remarkable photo.

    19. National Library of Ireland on The Commons 24 months ago | reply

      Brilliant to hear from you. I'm adding your information to the description under this great photo. Delighted you like it!

    20. pellethepoet 18 months ago | reply

      Reproduced in Colm Lincoln's Steps & Steeples : Cork at the Turn of the Century, Dublin : O'Brien Press, 1981, p. 36.

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