• This is a good luck charm (omamori) that works by standing in for you (mishiro) when there is some bad luck coming your way. It claims to be of a buddhist related "chizou" but what are buddhists doing with talismen anyway? Tradition is Shinto in origin.
  • Prayer Beads. Just like catholics Buddhist say one hail matreya or boddhistatva of choice per bead. The more hail boddhisatva's you say, the purer you become.

Talisman and Prayer Beads

Newer Older

Omamori (good luck charms, or talisman) are normally associated with Shinto but the prayer beads with Buddhism. It is quite common for Buddhist temples in Japan to sell good luck charms however.

This is a good luck charm (omamori) that works by standing in for you (mishiro) when there is some bad luck coming your way. The bad luck collects in the amulet, rather than you yourself. The amulets are then disposed of at temples and shrines once they have become full of bad luck.

It claims to be of a buddhist related "chizou" but what are buddhists doing with talismen anyway? Tradition is Shinto in origin.

Dr Tao, Aoife city womanchile, and 7 other people added this photo to their favorites.

  1. behind-Eyes 119 months ago | reply

    i love shinto goods--omamori, ofuda and gosyuin.

    this is the interesting combination of omamori and juzu. because juzu is an item of buddhism. amazing view.

  2. timtak 119 months ago | reply

    The omamori above is one that was sold by a buddhist temple. There are shrines with Buddhas in them (even some shrines with scripture in them) and there are temples which sell all the knicknackery of Shinto.

  3. Dr Tao 119 months ago | reply

    Surely, amazing...

  4. giveawayboy 119 months ago | reply

    Although I'm not Buddhist, the boddhistatvas I resonate with the most are Avolokiteshvara and Jizo. As a Catholic, I just appreciate ways in which our different traditions resemble each other and I encourage mutual sharing and learning between disciplines. Peace.

  5. timtak 119 months ago | reply

    Thanks folks.!

    To Giveaway boy

    I have a theory that Joudou ShinShuu or "Pure Land" Buddhism may be based upon Catholicism. Or, if not actually based upon Catholicism in inception, taps a simiar religious sentiment, and when Catholicism was outlawed in Japan, may have been the religion of choice for those that would otherwise worship Christianity.

    Joudoushinshu
    1) Simple prayer for any time or occasion
    2) "Other power" Buddhism - it is only by worship that humans can reach the Buddha
    3) The vow of the Amida Buddha is to bear our sins and lead all into enlightenment.
    4) Enlightenment happens post death - those that believe in the Amida buddha are reborn in the "pure land" (which is in the West!)
    5) It is especially for sinners - even the bad can reach englightenment if they believe in and worship the Amida Buddha.

    Interesting difference - The Amida Buddha is neither male nor female.

  6. giveawayboy 119 months ago | reply

    Thanks for this Pure Land info. I had heard a little about this before, but you have restated it for me in a short and clear way. Thanks.

  7. xxxlguy 99 months ago | reply

    The large white bead at the bottom has a picture inside. There are 2 holes, one on either side of the bead. If you hold the bead up to a light and look through the smaller hole, you'll see a picture of Buddha.

  8. romulus200a 88 months ago | reply

    Timtak,
    I want to give juzu to a friend.What years are maiyaku and honyaku?She is having some issues and hope it will protect her from bad luck.

  9. timtak 88 months ago | reply

    The unlucky years are 25, 42, and 61 for men and 19, 33, and 37 for women. These are the "hon-yaku" the year before is the mae-yaku. The unlucky years are counted as per the number of new years that one has passed not the number of birthdays. So I think that means the unlucky years are the calendar year around ones 24, 41, and 60th birth day for men and the year around ones 18th, 32nd, and 37th birthday for women.

keyboard shortcuts: previous photo next photo L view in light box F favorite < scroll film strip left > scroll film strip right ? show all shortcuts