• Base is 13.5 meters high, columns 19.9, and the complete, non-ruined temple about 39.6 (J. Ward-Perkins, "Roman Imperial Architecture") - Dominus Et Deus
  • Columns are made of Egyptian granite; the rest of the temple is limestone (J. Ward-Perkins, "Roman Imperial Architecture") - Dominus Et Deus

'Ba'lbek, Collones du Grande Temple, vue du sud', (Baalbek (Lebanon) Columns of the Great Temple, view from the south)

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Wilhelm Hammerschmidt (active c.1858-1870); 'Ba'lbek, Collones du Grande Temple, vue du sud', (Baalbek (Lebanon) Columns of the Great Temple, view from the south), about 1860s; Albumen print; 27.2 x 22cm

Don McCullin is one of Britain’s greatest photographers. For his latest project he has photographed archaeological remains around the Mediterranean. On a recent visit to the Museum, to coincide with the opening of a major exhibition of his work, Don made a personal selection of photographs from the National Media Museum's collection, revealing how these sites were recorded by earlier photographers such as Francis Frith and Maxime Du Camp.

Don McCullin: "I'm pretty sure that this is what's left of the Temple of Jupiter because I've photographed Baalbek two or three times. It is the most beautiful place in the Roman world. It is considered by the British Museum to be one of the gems, so it would be wrong not to include this picture."

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We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions of the original physical version of apply though; if you're unsure please visit the National Media Museum website.

For obtaining reproductions of selected images please go to the Science and Society Picture Library.

Lavda, wdb3b, Kenchy, and 40 other people added this photo to their favorites.

  1. Zigpha 56 months ago | reply

    Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Zigpha, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

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