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Thoth Caduceus, Asklepios Mercury,Hermes | by TRANCE  GATE
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Thoth Caduceus, Asklepios Mercury,Hermes

The rod, the Caduceus of Mercury or the Karykeion of Hermes, a short rod entwined by two snakes and topped by a pair of wings, is often used as a ‘medical’ symbol instead of the staff of the Physician Asklepios with only one snake –this misuse is a remnant of the alchemists that associated Mercury, the magician, with healing powers(Hermes the Shepherd, became famous to be able to charm men’s eyes to sleep, actually with the rod he got from Apollo, but in a modern sense Mercury represents captivating or fascinating words, tricky and deceiving, that can lure or charm men’s eyes into sleep, or into a hypnotic trance). ‘Karykeion’ derived from the Greek karykeion = ‘herald’s staff’, itself based on the word ‘eruko’ meaning restrain, control.

The rod as a magic tool probably derived from the Egyptian Thoth; Egyptians loved snakes as a symbol of power and Thoth was the god in charge of restraining or controling good and evil forces to stay balanced, and who also had such a magic rod. The single serpent staff also appears on a Sumerian vase of c. 2000 B.C. representing the healing god Ningishita, the prototype of the Greek Asklepios.

And to add some biblical confusion: …the Lord said unto him [Moses], What is that in thine hand? And he said, A rod. And he said, Cast it on the ground. And he cast it on the ground, and it became a serpent; and Moses fled from before it. And the Lord said unto Moses, Put forth thine hand, and take it by the tail. And he put forth his hand and caught it and it became a rod in his hand. Exodus 4:2-4 And the Lord said unto Moses, Make thee a fiery serpent, and set it upon a pole: and it shall come to pass, that every one that is bitten [by a sepent or madness?], when he looketh upon it, shall live

 

The rod, the Caduceus of Mercury or the Karykeion of Hermes, a short rod entwined by two snakes and topped by a pair of wings, is often used as a ‘medical’ symbol instead of the staff of the Physician Asklepios with only one snake –this misuse is a remnant of the alchemists that associated Mercury

 

Thot's Scepter: The ancient Egyptian deity Thot was a god of science, sorcery and an "accountant" of the soul's earthly deeds. This is the design of his staff. A 2- or 3mm thick copper ire is twisted at the end into the shape of a flat spiral, with 3-4 coils 10 cm in diameter. It has also 2 coils of transverse, 3-dimensional spiral, each 5 cm in diameter, closer to the handle. The wire is inserted into the 16 cm long, square-sectioned handle made from dense wood. The handle is 4 cm thick at base and 1.5 cm thick at its wire end. The entire staff with the wire coil is 41 cm long. The narrow end of the handle has 13 deep bellow shaped notches.

The staff works even without the wire (albeit not as intensely). The wire is thin and could be of any material. But, it works the best when it is thickly insulated in two layers. This increases its effect. If you hold the staff as demonstrated in the picture, the total radiation emanating from the center of the large spiral, perpendicular to its surface, are very well-perceivable by the human palm on both sides of the spiral. I have never found out the purpose behind this ancient Egyptian tool and what use they may have had for this "double-beam" emanator.

 

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Taken on April 27, 2009