new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
A Million Stars in the Deep South ( NGC 104, 47 Tucanae ) by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/mikeoday ) | by Mike O'Day
Back to photostream

A Million Stars in the Deep South ( NGC 104, 47 Tucanae ) by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/mikeoday )

NGC 104 ( also known as 47 Tucanae ) alongside the far more distant NGC 121 in the constellation Tucana by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay )

 

NGC 104 - 47 Tucanae, is the second largest Globular Cluster in the sky ( after Omega Centauri ). Only visible from lower latitudes, it was not recorded by European observers until Nicholas de Lacaille did so whilst visiting South Africa in 1751.

 

Containing millions of stars and appearing about the size of the full moon, 47 Tucanae is in fact approximately 214 light years in diameter and around 15,000 light years from Earth..

 

The smaller cluster, NGC 121, appears as a companion to 47 Tucanae but is in fact of similar size, more than ten times farther away at around 200,000 light years and belongs to one of the Milkyway's dwarf galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud.

 

Links:

 

500px.com/MikeODay

photo.net/photos/MikeODay

 

Details:

 

47 Tucanae / NGC 104

RA 00h 24.1m, Dec -72 deg 5'

 

NGC 121

RA 00h 268.1m, Dec -71 deg 31'

 

Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope

Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount

Guiding: Orion Shortube 80 guidescope, Starshoot Autoguider, PHD2

Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector

Nikon D5300 (unmodified)

Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90

Combination of 66 images ranging from 25 to 200 sec @ ISO400

 

16 Oct 2015

re-processed 21 Sept 2016

 

Pixinsight

4,486 views
91 faves
10 comments
Uploaded on September 22, 2016