new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white

Schulz/Neef House-1739 East 29th Avenue

Schulz-Neef House

1739 E. 29th Avenue in Denver, Colorado USA

 

The Schulz-Neef house is one of the oldest homes in the Whittier Neighborhood. Its steeply-gabled roof, ornamental woodwork and pointed finials stand out as a fine example of the Gothic Revival architectural style, a rarity in Denver residences.

 

Built: 1881

Architect: unknown

Style: Gothic Revival/Carpenter Gothic

 

Built for German immigrant R. Ernst Schulz, a bookeeper at the German National Bank and real estate investor, the first residents also included prominent architect Frederick C. Eberley and family.

 

The house then became home to Max Neef and family after his brother Fred (whose house on Grove Street is also a Denver Landmark) acquired it at public auction in 1883.

Max and Fred Neef were liquor and tobacco wholesalers as well as saloon owners. They later owned and operated the Neef Brothers Brewery, one of the largest in the West. Max Neef died in the house in 1921, but his family continued to live there until the passing of his wife Carrie in 1945.

 

The house was briefly converted to four apartments, but returned to single-family use by The Nonakas, a Japanese family displaced during W.W.II who lived there from 1946-1967.

 

In the 1970s and 1980s, this was the home of Reynelda Muse, Colorado's first African-American and first woman news anchor. Her husband Daniel Muse was the Colorado Assistant Attorney General, and later served as City Attorney of Denver.

 

The Schulz-Neef house is one of the oldest homes in the Whittier Neighborhood. Its steeply-gabled roof, ornamental woodwork and pointed finials stand out as a fine example of the Gothic Revival architectural style, a rarity in Denver residences.

Photos and text: Gary Kleiner

Sources include: Landmark applications, Asssesor's records, Denver City Directory.

 

8,615 views
10 faves
2 comments
Taken on October 28, 2008