The Hundredth Monkey Effect

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    This phenomenon is considered to be due to critical mass. When a limited number of people know something in a new way, it remains the conscious property of only those people. The Hundredth Monkey Syndrome hypothesises that there is a point at which if only one more person tunes in to a new awareness, a field of energy is strengthened so that new awareness is picked up by almost everyone.

    The Hundredth Monkey Effect was first introduced by biologist Lyall Watson in his 1980 book, ‘Lifetide.’ He reported that Japanese primatologists, who were studying Macaques monkeys in the wild in the 1950s, had stumbled upon a surprising phenomenon. Some anthropologist were studying the habits of monkeys on some islands in the ocean off the shores of Japan. They found one particularly smart little fellow, and taught it to wash its food before eating it. He learned to do this quite quickly. Soon the other monkeys in his family also began to wash their food before eating it. Later this behavior spread to other monkeys in the clan. About the time one hundred monkeys were washing their food prior to eating it, suddenly all the monkeys on all the islands, some thousands of miles away, began to wash their food before eating it.

    This surprising observation became known as the Hundredth Monkey Effect and has been repeatedly observed. This same phenomenon is true in humans as well. It is part of the reason we have trends in fashion, the economy, and politics, etc. When we understand this concept, it becomes very important for us to develop our positive thinking. Humanity will be free, free at last. Free to build a better world, by "giving" - from the immense power of love, instead of "taking" - from the energy of fear.

    read more: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hundredth-monkey_effect

    © Copyright 2009 Michael Paukner. All Rights Reserved.
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    yaleman, universeist, and 76 other people added this photo to their favorites.

    1. martinolli 55 months ago | reply

      you art is unbelievable greetings from México

    2. naumanansari 55 months ago | reply

      Great work Mic

    3. OscarFalcon 54 months ago | reply

      Woah, interesting...

    4. Penrod Vladyka [deleted] 54 months ago | reply

      That is so wierd..I was driving home from work thinking about this (100 monkey effect) and couldn't remember the name of it and landed on this webpage...all of your work is very interesting and professionally done...thanks for sharing.

    5. - Joci - 54 months ago | reply

      This is the Best!

    6. Gagan.singh 54 months ago | reply

      hi Michael, nice graphic. Just wanted to bring this to ur notice: www.uhh.hawaii.edu/~ronald/HMP.htm

    7. 424-2564 54 months ago | reply

      incredible and educational! what more could i ever ask for!

    8. alv_168 51 months ago | reply

      from the Wikipedia link:
      The effect discredited

      An analysis of the appropriate literature by Ron Amundson, published by the Skeptics Society, revealed several key points that demystified the supposed effect.

      Unsubstantiated claims that there was a sudden and remarkable increase in the proportion of washers in the first population were exaggerations of a much slower, more mundane effect. Rather than all monkeys mysteriously learning the skill it was noted that it was predominantly younger monkeys that learned the skill from the older monkeys through the usual means of imitation; older monkeys who did not know how to wash tended not to learn. As the older monkeys died and younger monkeys were born the proportion of washers naturally increased. The time span between observations was in the order of years.

      Claims that the practice spread suddenly to other isolated populations of monkeys ignore the fact that at least one washing monkey swam to another population and spent about four years there.[citation needed] It is also to be noted that the sweet potato was not available to the monkeys prior to human intervention: it is not at all surprising that isolated populations of monkeys started to wash potatoes in a similar time frame once they were made available.

    9. Chris[topher] Lin 46 months ago | reply

      Interesting!

      --
      http://twitter.com/hufort (?)

    10. oXane 46 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called New Directions, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    11. oXane 46 months ago | reply

      monkey business,.

    12. borgmarc 43 months ago | reply

      t-shirt! pleeaaaaaaaaeeeeese (http://www.threadless.com/ ? )

    13. nnniccck 34 months ago | reply

      absolutely fantastic!

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