new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
City of Miami Springs, Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA | by Photographer South Florida
Back to group

City of Miami Springs, Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA

Miami Springs is a city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The city was founded by Glenn Hammond Curtiss, "The Father of Naval Aviation", and James Bright, during the famous "land boom" of the 1920s and was originally named Country Club Estates. It, along with other cities in Miami-Dade County such as Coral Gables, Florida, and Opa-locka, Florida, formed some of the first planned communities in the state. Like its counterparts, the city had an intended theme which in its case, was to reflect a particular architecture and ambiance.

 

In this case it was a regional style of architecture called Pueblo Revival developed in the southwest, primarily New Mexico, and incorporating design elements of Pueblo architecture. Other buildings incorporated Mission style design. In fact, the original Hotel Country Club was designed to resemble a Pueblo village.

 

Shortly prior to incorporation in 1926, the city was renamed after a spring located in the area which provided parts of Miami with fresh water until the mid-1990s. As of 2010, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 13,809.

 

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.0 square miles (7.8 km2). 2.9 square miles (7.5 km2) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) of it (1.34%) is water.

 

Miami Springs was founded by an aviation pioneer, and thus, the fate of the city has always been intertwined with the aviation industry, particularly since Miami International Airport (MIA) is located just south of the city on the southern border of NW 36th Street. The airline industry brought many residents from airline crew bases, as well as employment opportunities at the airport, which brought much prosperity to the city. This dependence, however, left the city vulnerable. The sudden 1991 collapses of both Eastern Airlines and Pan American World Airways left many Miami Springs residents unemployed and unable to afford living in the neighborhood. Given that the businesses in Miami Springs had always relied upon the large disposable incomes of the employees of the large airline carriers, the bankruptcy of both corporations in the same year created a chain reaction, eventually causing many small businesses to close their doors. Despite the closure of the airlines, from a residential standpoint, Miami Springs remained strong. The city is often seen as blessedly isolated from the perceived turbulence of the rest of Miami-Dade County. This has continued to provide ample replacements for the older residents who are lost over time. Nonetheless the legacy of the airline closures remains. Residential millage taxation rates hover near the state mandated maximum because continued weakness in the commercial sector makes it an insufficient source of tax revenue.

 

Roughly speaking the core of Miami Springs (excluding the more recently annexed areas) is roughly shaped as a triangle with three definable sides. Northwest 36th Street forms most of the southern boundary whilst the Miami River canal forms the northern/eastern boundary. Finally, the Ludlam Canal and Florida East Coast Railroad Yard delimit the western boundary.

 

Credit for the data above is given to the following website:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami_Springs,_Florida

 

© All Rights Reserved - you may not use this image in any form without my prior permission.

 

451 views
49 faves
0 comments
Taken on October 4, 2020