Regeneration - Carlton Towers, Leeds

Just over a week ago this pile of rubble looked like the building to its left. It is the first of several blocks that are due for demolition in this area.

 

The redevelopment is being documented by several photographers here on Flickr, but most comprehensively by James Bell www.flickr.com/photos/jamesw-bell/sets/72157623315479893/

And www.flickr.com/photos/jamesw-bell/sets/72157623227498787/

 

This is my small contiribution to the recording of this regeneration, photographed by a camera lifted by a kite. Best Viewed Large On Black

 

This image features in A Different Perspective by Martin Roe

www.blurb.com/user/store/meerstone1

  • James W Bell - Leeds 5y

    Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Tower Blocks and Architecture of the 1960s and 1970s (UK only), and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    thanks for the link, but it's not necessary! it's always good to see efforts in different styles.

    excellent viewpoint :)

    Best Wishes

    James
  • Melani Amarathunga 5y

    Hi, I'm an admin for a group called The World From Above, and we'd love to have this added to the group!
  • Michael Layefsky 5y

    Great shot.....I love this set! Now I want to see another aerial photo of that other building in mid-collapse!

    I tried such a shot once, semi-successfully.The blast startled the hell out of me!!
  • meerstone 5y

    Thanks Michael. No big bangs here its all done by machine. The blue machine has been brought in specially. It apparently has a 50m reach. I will have to see if I can get over when the next one starts to come down. The area is surrounded by tower blocks so the wind could be tricky.
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Taken on February 22, 2010
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