Art in Architecture: The Collaborative Spirit of the Interwar Period in Detroit
Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum Welcomes Art in Architecture: The Collaborative Spirit of the Interwar Period in Detroit Exhibition

VIDEO: Melissa Ford talks about the exhibition

The Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum will host an exhibition, Art in Architecture: The Collaborative Spirit of the Interwar Period in Detroit, Saturday, Feb. 5 through Saturday, May 28. A reception to celebrate the exhibition’s opening will be held at the Museum Saturday, Feb. 19 from 2 to 4 p.m.

Melissa Ford, Museum Archivist, is curator of the exhibition. “We are very excited to share this exhibition with the Great Lakes Bay Region. Detroit has some of the finest surviving examples of Art Deco and classical revival architecture in the country. These buildings include beautiful tile work, stained glass, mosaics, and sculpture. During the 1920s and ‘30s, architects, artists, and craftsmen collaborated on the design of these structures, resulting in some of the city’s most stunning architecture,” said Ford. “This exhibit includes objects and documents from the collections of the Detroit Historical Museum, Cranbrook Educational Community, Meadow Brook Hall, Temple Beth El, Penobscot Building, and the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum collection,” said Ford.

Museum Director Marilyn Wheaton said, “Originally museum staff envisioned an exhibition that would examine the relationship and the collaborations between architect Alden B. Dow and sculptor Marshall M. Fredericks. Once the research commenced, however, the landscape appeared fertile for a much broader scope of artists and architects collaborations, particularly in the Detroit area between the first and second world wars.”

Two architectural writers will give lectures related to the exhibition. John Gallagher, architecture critic and urban development writer for the Detroit Free Press, will present “The Greatness of Detroit Architecture in the Interwar Years,” Wednesday, March 16 at 7 p.m. A second lecture will follow from Jennifer Baross of Destination Detroit Media, on “Corrado Parducci, Detroit’s Architectural Sculptor,” Wednesday, April 6 at 7 pm.

This exhibition is made possible by a grant from the Michigan Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
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