Olga and Tatiana, Czar's daughters (LOC)

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    Bain News Service,, publisher.

    Olga and Tatiana, Czar's daughters

    [between ca. 1910 and ca. 1915]

    1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.

    Notes:
    Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards.
    Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

    Format: Glass negatives.

    Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

    Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

    General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

    Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.15942

    Call Number: LC-B2- 3045-6

    anonymous_emily, thegarveys5, and 23 other people added this photo to their favorites.

    1. Richard Arthur Norton (1958- ) 40 months ago | reply

      Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia (Olga Nikolaevna Romanova) (Russian: Великая Княжна Ольга Николаевна; November 15 [O.S. November 3] 1895, November 16 after 1900 – July 17, 1918) was the eldest daughter of the last autocratic ruler of the Russian Empire, Emperor Nicholas II, and of Empress Alexandra of Russia.
      During her lifetime, Olga's future marriage was the subject of great speculation within Russia. Matches were rumored with Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich of Russia, Crown Prince Carol of Romania, Edward, Prince of Wales, eldest son of Britain's George V, and with Crown Prince Alexander of Serbia. Olga herself wanted to marry a Russian and remain in her home country. Olga's murder following the Russian Revolution of 1917 resulted in her canonization as a passion bearer by the Russian Orthodox Church. In later years, when dozens of people made claims to be surviving members of the imperial family, a woman named Marga Boodts claimed to be Grand Duchess Olga, but her claim was not taken seriously. Olga was assassinated along with her family at Ekaterinburg. Her remains were identified through DNA testing and were buried during a funeral ceremony in 1998 at Peter and Paul Cathedral in St. Petersburg along with those of her parents and two of her sisters.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duchess_Olga_Nikolaevna_of_Ru...

      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duchess_Tatiana_Nikolaevna_of...

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