Mavericks QP Blastoff

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She leapt off the pad with a glorious 30 ft. plume.

Computer simulations estimated she would scream to 100,000 ft. at Mach 3

• 22 ft. tall, 540 lbs
• Booster stage: machined aluminum fin can and inter-stage coupler mounted directly on the Q motor casing.
• Upper stage: Custom wound composites, titanium tip
• Festooned with redundant computers, GPS, RF transmission
• Q booster staging to a P motor with a custom forward thermite igniter
• ~6x the thrust of a cruise missile booster

I’ll share some other build photos and launch video below…

  1. jurvetson 68 months ago | reply

    1-minute Launch Video (airborne footage edited down; it took longer to return than the video run time) and the full size photo

    Upper Stage, Motors & machining, RockSim of flight, upper stage test:

    Rocket Build Weekend Secret Santa Workshop Big BALLS project P-Ref  Blastoff

  2. pegleg000 68 months ago | reply

    It looks like this shot was taken within about 4 hours, or so, of SpaceX's successful orbital launch! Sometimes it just takes 3 practice launches!-) Rumor has it that the SpaceX guys are still celebrating ....

  3. Todd Huffman 68 months ago | reply

    Q and a P?????!?!?!??!

    Not only is that enormous, but lends itself to outrageous puns!

    You mind you P's and Q's!
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P's_and_Q's

  4. Apollo 11 68 months ago | reply

    That is a thing of beauty!

  5. Omeudentista® Busy. 68 months ago | reply

    Great! Remembers me my youth when I played with ESTES rockets.

  6. .schtieF 68 months ago | reply

    wasnt there a cam and an altitude meter onboard? would be nice to make a pic at apogee

  7. rocketmavericks 68 months ago | reply

    Just a quick update, Steve. The nozzle on the Q blew about 2 seconds into thrust, creating the asymmetry that pushed the rocket horizontally.
    All electronics fired as planned, and the sustainer separated at false apogee, snapping the 4000 lbf rated shock cord. We have the nose cone, nose cone avionics and flight electronics and they are functional and under analysis. The sustainer motor section proceeded ballistically, and detonated, creating the huge crater and frag pattern we forwarded in photos. So the rocket performed to specification, but the cracked graphite nozzle failure suggest a new nozzle design for an even bigger rocket next year. problem is that our rockets are getting bigger than we are allowed to fly without additional waivers. Also need a better nozzle design, especially if we build a full scale Redstone.

  8. Todd Huffman 68 months ago | reply

    @rocketmavericks Love the analysis. Sounds like you need to get more waivers!

  9. jurvetson 68 months ago | reply

    ...a visual for Toma/rocketmavericks' description:

    QP crater

    Also, here’s a final test video where Tom detonates the separation charge to make sure the machined aluminum structures will work to separate the booster and sustainer stages of the rocket.

  10. Victor1 68 months ago | reply

    Its in there somewhere....

  11. jurvetson 68 months ago | reply

    The truth is out there...

    Here's an even better video from Rockets Magazine...

  12. jurvetson 67 months ago | reply

    RocketsMagazine also has a great video montage of the weekend, opening with this launch... and that camera in the foreground.

    Videos best viewed full screen size.

  13. jurvetson 67 months ago | reply

    A shard of the booster was found at the crater. The "CSI report" from Dick's return to the site this weekend concludes:

    "We now know that the booster did not separate from the sustainer, and that the booster followed the sustainer right into the playa and left behind a couple of traces of its prior existence."

  14. jurvetson 62 months ago | reply

    Just watched a larger project.... with a similar outcome.... and with an automobile as the payload! Crazy Brits...

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