new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
I'm being followed by a moon shadow... | by John Underwood
Back to album

I'm being followed by a moon shadow...

  

After sunset over Wirksworth in Derbyshire. I like the jet trails, the way they slowly expand and slowly fade away, they can sometimes have a dramatic effect on the evening sky as the light gradually disappears. Sunset or sundown is the daily disappearance of the Sun below the horizon in the west as a result of Earth's rotation.

 

The time of sunset is defined in astronomy as the moment the trailing edge of the Sun's disk disappears below the horizon in the west. The ray path of light from the setting Sun is highly distorted near the horizon because of atmospheric refraction, making sunset appear to occur when the Sun’s disk is already about one diameter below the horizon. Sunset is distinct from dusk, which is the moment at which darkness falls, which occurs when the Sun is approximately eighteen degrees below the horizon. The period between sunset and dusk is called twilight.

 

Locations north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle experience no sunset or sunrise at least one day of the year, when the polar day or the polar night persist continuously for 24 hours.

 

Sunset creates unique atmospheric conditions such as the often intense orange and red colors of the Sun and the surrounding sky.

 

The Moon is Earth's only known natural satellite and the fifth largest satellite in the Solar System. It is the largest natural satellite of a planet in the Solar System relative to the size of its primary, having a quarter the diameter of Earth and 1⁄81 its mass. The Moon is the second densest satellite after Io, a satellite of Jupiter. It is in synchronous rotation with Earth, always showing the same face; the near side is marked with dark volcanic maria among the bright ancient crustal highlands and prominent impact craters. It is the brightest object in the sky after the Sun, although its surface is actually very dark, with a similar reflectance to coal. Its prominence in the sky and its regular cycle of phases have since ancient times made the Moon an important cultural influence on language, calendars, art and mythology. The Moon's gravitational influence produces the ocean tides and the minute lengthening of the day. The Moon's current orbital distance, about thirty times the diameter of the Earth, causes it to appear almost the same size in the sky as the Sun, allowing it to cover the Sun nearly precisely in total solar eclipses.

1,437 views
7 faves
3 comments
Taken on August 23, 2011