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Image from page 367 of "An encyclopædia of gardening; comprising the theory and practice of horticulture, floriculture, arboriculture, and landscape-gardening, including all the latest improvements; a general history of gardening in all countries; and a s | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 367 of "An encyclopædia of gardening; comprising the theory and practice of horticulture, floriculture, arboriculture, and landscape-gardening, including all the latest improvements; a general history of gardening in all countries; and a s

Title: An encyclopædia of gardening; comprising the theory and practice of horticulture, floriculture, arboriculture, and landscape-gardening, including all the latest improvements; a general history of gardening in all countries; and a statistical view of its present state, with suggestions for its future progress, in the British Isles

Identifier: encyclopdiaofg00loud

Year: 1827 (1820s)

Authors: Loudon, J. C. (John Claudius), 1783-1843

Subjects: Gardening

Publisher: London : Printed for Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

 

 

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311

 

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1786. The tied plank {fig. 314.) is formed by fixing the ends of one or more planks in two heads or cases of cast-iron (a, a), and then connecting them by wrought-iron rods (b, b) fixed to the heads in the manner of a string to a bow. A very light bridge is thus formed, which acts both by tenacity and gravity. Thus, when a light weight is on the bridge, the particles of the boards are not moved, but merely pressed on, and therefore the arched part may then be said to act by gravity ; while this pressure being propagated to the abutments, these are held in equilibrium by the iron rods acting by their tenacity. On the other hand, when a bridge of this sort is heavily loaded, the

 

 

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