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Image from page 35 of "Cotton, its cultivation, marketing, manufacture, and the problems of the cotton world" (1906) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 35 of "Cotton, its cultivation, marketing, manufacture, and the problems of the cotton world" (1906)

Identifier: cottonitscultiva01burk

Title: Cotton, its cultivation, marketing, manufacture, and the problems of the cotton world

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Burkett, Charles William, 1873- Poe, Clarence Hamilton, 1881-

Subjects: Cotton growing Cotton manufacture

Publisher: New York, Doubleday, Page

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

..^ yt^jM.^* .,^- ¥: Kj^L3 >3<5^y)^ ^rionH^S^. - o 6 Xi/^/zcXt/w *i^^. A MONARCH THAT BROOKS NO RIVALS. Our cotton exports exceed in value all other exports combined—the total valueof all other products from every American farm, ranch, dairy, fruit farm, stock farm,and garden, North, South, East and West.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

IAKI OF ULR .15410,000,000 IN COTTON EXPORT VALUES An ocean steamer taking on three bales of compressed cotton for export toEnglish mills. COTTON 17 THE BEGINNING OF ENGLAND^S GREATEST INDUSTRY Our English ancestors, late in taking up the man-ufacture of cotton, even after beginning it allowedthe industry to grow slowly. Spinning was done onthe distaff, or at best on the one-thread spinning-wheel; and for weaving the hand-loom had knownbut little improvement since the days of the Caes-ars. Nor was there any kind of co-operation,any division of labor; each individual family at-tempted to carry on the entire process of spinningand weaving the cloth. But about 1760 we see the beginnings of a revolu-tion. The Manchester merchants then began tofurnish cotton and linen yarn to weavers, payinga fixed price for spinning and weaving the product—and so the industry, hitherto primitive and cha-otic, began for the first time to take shape as a defin-ite, well-planned organization. Very soon aft

 

 

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