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Image from page 205 of "Luther Burbank, his methods and discoveries and their practical application; prepared from his original field notes covering more than 100,000 experiments made during forty years devoted to plant improvement" (1914) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 205 of "Luther Burbank, his methods and discoveries and their practical application; prepared from his original field notes covering more than 100,000 experiments made during forty years devoted to plant improvement" (1914)

Identifier: lutherburbankhis03burb

Title: Luther Burbank, his methods and discoveries and their practical application; prepared from his original field notes covering more than 100,000 experiments made during forty years devoted to plant improvement

Year: 1914 (1910s)

Authors: Burbank, Luther, 1849-1926 Whitson, John John, Robert Williams, Henry Smith, 1863-1943 Luther Burbank Society

Subjects: Plant breeding

Publisher: New York, Luther Burbank Press

Contributing Library: NCSU Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: NCSU Libraries

  

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lings are placed onthe strongest-growing branches of the tree, thestronger growers being placed toward the outsideand lower down on the tree and on the smallerbranches. When so many varieties are grafted on a singletree, some may be extremely vigorous growers,others only moderately so, and still others will beweak, slow growers. In the winter pruning wealways take pains to give the weaker growersplenty of space to develop, while the strongergrowers are severely pruned. It is no small matter to prune properly a treeon which several hundred varieties are beingtested. An ordinary pruner might ruin the treein a few minutes, by leaving the most worthlessvarieties almost covering the tree, while smaller,slower-growing varieties of great value might beso crowded that they would either die or becomestunted and bear no fruit. This later aspect of theprocess of grafting, then, is one that imperativelydemands the attention of the plant-developer him-self, or of his most skilful assistants. [195]

 

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-ae s o «/5 s a. CQ G, o ^ S ^ ^ u u ».: o c c a : ri ^ A. ?» != h 03 =!-=: s-5 a S c o *~- -o ^ -c ^.u c 2 t^ -a0^ ^ Letting the Bees DoTheir Work Nature Will Help UsAll She Can OUT in the desert regions of the southwesternUnited States there grows a very remark-able plant called the yucca, or Spanishbayonet. Doubtless j^ou have noticed it from thecar window, or you may have seen it growing ina garden. Its bristling array of bayonet-like leavesgives it a very individual appearance, and thecluster of creamy white flowers that it puts forthon its tall central stalk gives it added distinction.But even if you are familiar with the appear-ance of the plant, you perhaps have never heardthe wonderful story of its alliance with a particularspecies of insect, upon which alliance the lives ofboth plant and insect absolutely depend. The story is one of the most curious ones inthe entire range of plant and animal life. Casesof so-called symbiosis, in which an insect and aplant are mutually mo

  

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Taken circa 1914