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Image from page 104 of "Chemistry: general, medical, and pharmaceutical, including the chemistry of the U. S. Pharmacopia. A manual on the general principles of the science, and their applications in medicine and pharmacy" (1894) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 104 of "Chemistry: general, medical, and pharmaceutical, including the chemistry of the U. S. Pharmacopia. A manual on the general principles of the science, and their applications in medicine and pharmacy" (1894)

Identifier: chemistrygener00attf

Title: Chemistry: general, medical, and pharmaceutical, including the chemistry of the U. S. Pharmacopia. A manual on the general principles of the science, and their applications in medicine and pharmacy

Year: 1894 (1890s)

Authors: Attfield, John, 1835-1911

Subjects: Chemistry Pharmaceutical chemistry

Publisher: Philadelphia, Lea brothers & co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

dor ; hencethe above operation, and many others described farther on, inwhich this gas is indispensable, can only be performed in theopen air or in a fume-cupboard—a chamber so contrived thatdeleterious gases and vapors shall escape into a chimney inconnection with the external air. In the above experimentthe small quantity of gas required can be made in a test-tube,after the manner of hydrogen itself. To some fragments offerrous sulphide (FeS) add water, and then sulphuric acid ; thegas is at once evolved, and may be conducted by a tube into thesolution of ammonia. Ferrous sulphate remains dissolved: FeS + H2SO, = H2S -f FeS04. Sulphuretted-hydrogen Apparatus.—As no heat is necessaryin making sulphuretted hydrogen (U. S. P.), the test-tube ofthe foregoing operation may be advantageously replaced by abottle, especially when larger quantities of the gas are required.In analytical operations the gas should be purified by passingit through water contained in a second bottle. Fig. 18.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Sulphuretted-hydrogen Apparatus. The most convenient arrangement for experimental use isprepared as follows : Two common wide-mouth bottles areselected, the one having a capacity of about half a pint, theother a quarter pint; the former may be called the generating-bottle, the latter the ivash-bottle. Fit two corks to the bottles.Through each cork bore two holes, with a round file or otherinstrument, of such size that glass tubing of about the diam- 98 THE METALLIC RADICALS. eter of a quill pen shall fit them tightly. Through one of theholes in the cork of the generating-bottle pass a funnel-tube, sothat its extremity may nearly reach the bottom of the bottle. Tothe other hole adapt a piece of tubing six inches long and bentin the middle to a right angle. A similar elbow-tube is fittedto one of the holes in the cork of the wash-bottle, and anotherelbow-tube, one arm of which is long enough to reach to nearthe bottom of the wash-bottle, fitted to the other hole. Re-moving the corks, tw

  

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Taken circa 1894