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Image from page 641 of "Industrial medicine and surgery" (1919) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 641 of "Industrial medicine and surgery" (1919)

Identifier: industrialmedici1919mock

Title: Industrial medicine and surgery

Year: 1919 (1910s)

Authors: Mock, Harry E. (Harry Edgar), 1880-

Subjects: Occupational diseases Working class Surgery Medicine

Publisher: Philadelphia and London : W. B. Saunders Company

Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

nd that the transplant is not simply a scaffold.Autogenous bone grafts have become of paramount value also in repairing many bony defects, such as those resulting from completeloss of bone due to: 1. Destructive infections, septic, tuberculosis, lues, etc. 2. Defects of development. 3. Benign tumors, as bone cysts, myeloma, etc. 4. Encapsulated malignant tumors, as giant-cell sarcoma andchondrosarcoma. These conditions are extremely important in industrial surgery asfractures from very slight injuries sometimes occur due to the presenceof these pathologic conditions. I have had two cases of fractureand one case of alleged injury to the finger in which the accidentwas really coincidental, the real cause being the presence of a bonecyst in each case. 634 INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE AND SURGERY Bone cysts are the small, single or multiple cysts found in the bodyof the bone and usually destroy most of the cortex, the periosteumoften serving as the cyst wall. They are the end-result of a low-grade

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fig. 169.—Multiple bone cysts, osteitis fibrosa, of hands discovered in an ap-plicant for work. Under present compensation laws the employer could be heldresponsible for subsequent fractures. inflammatory affection of the bone and medullary tissues, known asosteitis fibrosa.

  

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Taken circa 1919