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Image from page 617 of "Insects abroad : being a popular account of foreign insects, their structure, habits, and transformations" (1883) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 617 of "Insects abroad : being a popular account of foreign insects, their structure, habits, and transformations" (1883)

Identifier: insectsabroadbei00wooduoft

Title: Insects abroad : being a popular account of foreign insects, their structure, habits, and transformations

Year: 1883 (1880s)

Authors: Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889

Subjects: Insects

Publisher: London : Longmans, Green

Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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with a band of black, broadest at thetip. The centre of the wing is red, and the rest is bright yellow.The lower wings are entirely yellow, except two angular blackspots. The female is quite unlike the male, being simply blackand grey, and so dissimilar are the sexes that even an accom-plished practical entomologist like Mr. Wallace had some diffi-culty in determining the identity of the species. Mr. Wallace has given, in the Journal of Entomology, abrief but graphic description of the habits of these Butterflies:— The species of Iphias are all large and handsome Butterflies, p P 578 INSECTS ABROAD. frequenting the skirts of forests and the margins of streams inforest districts. The males often settle on the ground in damp and muddyplaces, in company with many Papilionidse and Pieridae. Whenthus resting, with wings erect,they are at once distinguishable fromall around them by the peculiar attitude they assume, the upperwings being depressed between the lower pair, so thai its basal

 

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Fin. 322.—Hebouoia (or [phias) lcncogynio. (Red, yellow, and black.) half is completely hidden by them. As probably a consequenceof this, we find that this basal half of the upper wings is alwayspale in colour on the under side, and devoid of the characteristicmarkings of the exposed portions. The females fly rather low,in woods and thickets, and, seldom coming out into the opengrounds, are therefore less easily captured. 1 found the female of this interesting species flying amongdense thickets in the island of Borneo, and was completely THE GLArCIlPF.. 579 puzzled by its appearance, till I one day caught a glimpse of theunderside of its wings, when I knew it must be an Iphias. Iafterwards obtained a few males, but it was never abundant. The specific name, leucogynia, is formed from two Greek wordssignifying a white female, and is given to the insect on accountof the pale colour of the female. Another species of this genus is represented in the accom-panying illustration. It has a l

  

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Taken circa 1883