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Image from page 550 of "Pompeii, its history, buildings, and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations, and also an itinerary for visitors" (1867) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 550 of "Pompeii, its history, buildings, and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations, and also an itinerary for visitors" (1867)

Identifier: pompeibuildings00dyer

Title: Pompeii, its history, buildings, and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations, and also an itinerary for visitors

Year: 1867 (1860s)

Authors: Dyer, Thomas Henry, 1804-1888

Subjects:

Publisher: London : Bell & Daldy

Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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TOMBS. 521 that it is merely indicative of the profession of Mnnatius ;the other allegorical, that it symholises the arrival of thetossed ship of life in a quiet haven. The reader may choosebetween the two, as the gods have made him poetical or pro-saic* On the opposite side of the cippus is the bisellium, orseat of honour, ranted to Munatius.

 

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Bas-relief on the Tomb of Nsevoleia Tyche. A sort of solid bench for the reception of urns runs roundthe funeral chamber, and several niches are hollowed in thewall. Some lamps were found here, and many urns, three ofglass, the rest of common earth. The glass urns were oflarge size, one of them fifteen inches in height by tenin diameter, and were protected from injury by leaden cases.They contained, when found, burnt bones, and a liquid whichhas been analyzed, and found to consist of mingled water,wine, and oil. In two of the urns it was of a reddish tint, inthe other yellow, oily and transparent. There can be nodoubt but that we have here the libations which wrere pomedas a last tribute of friendship upon the ashes of the tenants ofthe tomb. * In support of the latter opinion, Breton adduces several instances or theallegorical introduction of a ship in funeral monuments. Pompeia, p. 85, seq. 522 POMPEII. The burial-ground of Nistacidius, marked 12, offers nothingto detain us. It is s

  

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Taken circa 1867