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Image from page 139 of "The gold fields of the Klondike; fortune seekers' guide to the Yukon region of Alaska and British America;" (1897) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 139 of "The gold fields of the Klondike; fortune seekers' guide to the Yukon region of Alaska and British America;" (1897)

Identifier: goldfieldsofklon00leon

Title: The gold fields of the Klondike; fortune seekers' guide to the Yukon region of Alaska and British America;

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors: Leonard, John W., 1849-1932

Subjects:

Publisher: Chicago, A.N. Marquis & co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

 

 

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saw in order to make their boats, timber being quite plen-tiful. It will take about six hundred feet of lumber to make aboat to hold four men and outfits. It will be from twenty-five to thirty feet long, and should be carefully and stronglymade. Boats for the Yukon are made in all styles, andsome without any style at all. The best are made with lapstreaks, and are tightly calked with oakum and pitch.Take enough time to make the boat a sound one, for itmust last a considerable time and withstand rough usage. When the raft is completed and loaded, the voyage is com-menced. A good sail will help immensely, and if our party THE GOLD FIELDS OF THE KLONDIKE 5 are not sufficiently adept to make a sloop rig for the boat, asquare sail will do very well. KEEP TO THE RIGHT. The right-hand side of Lake Bennett should be followeduntil Cariboo Crossing is reached. Here there is a streamconnecting Lake Bennett with Lake Tagish, and near by isa well worn trail used by bands of Cariboo in their annual

 

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PROSPECTORS CAMP OX THE KLONDIKE. or biennial excursions. The connecting river is about twomiles long, and quite sluggish. In Lake Tagish we keepnear the left-hand shore for about eighteen miles, andthen enter a river which is about six miles long. Abouthalf way is Tagish House, a large Indian council house, 126 THE GOLD FIELDS OF THE KLONDIKE several huts and a burial ground, usually deserted, but be-longing to the Stick tribe of Indians. The river is wideand sluggish, and in some places quite shallow. Weemerge into Lake Marsh or Mud Lake, through whichwe follow the left bank twenty-five miles to the head ofa wide river, the Lewis. On Marsh Lake, if it be sum-mer, we learn most completely the suction capacity of thefamed Yukon mosquito. But now we are through it andwell on our way down the Lewis we have something else tothink of, for about twenty miles of the river having beenpassed we are approaching the worst danger points of thewhole journey. MILES CANON AND WHITE HORSE RAPIDS. Ab

 

 

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