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Image from page 160 of "Polynesian mythology and ancient traditional history of the New Zealand race, as furnished by their priests and chiefs" (1855) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 160 of "Polynesian mythology and ancient traditional history of the New Zealand race, as furnished by their priests and chiefs" (1855)

Identifier: polynesianmythol00greyuoft

Title: Polynesian mythology and ancient traditional history of the New Zealand race, as furnished by their priests and chiefs

Year: 1855 (1850s)

Authors: Grey, George, Sir, 1812-1898

Subjects: Mythology, Polynesian Legends -- New Zealand

Publisher: London : J. Murray

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

o Aotea-roa. The names ofthe canoes were as follows : the Arawa was firstcompleted, then Tainui, then Matatua, and Tald-tumu, and Kura-hau-po, and Toko-maru, andMatawhaorua. These are the names of the canoesin which our forefathers departed from Hawaiki, PEEPARATIONS TO EVIIGEATE. 135 and crossed to this island. When they had lashedthe topsides on to the Tainui, Rata slew the son ofManaia, and hid his body in the chips and shavingsof the canoes. The names of the axes with whichthey hewed out these canoes were Hauhau-te-Rangi,and Tutauru. Tutauru was the axe with whichthey cut off the head of Uenuku. All these axes were made from the block of greenstone brought back by Ngahue to Hawaiki, wliicliwas called The fish of Ngahue/ He had pre-viously come to these islands fiom Hawaiki, whenhe was driven out from thence by Hine-tu-a-hoanga,whose fish or stone was Obsidian. From that causeNgahue came to these islands ; the canoes whichafterwards arrived here came in consequence of hisdiscovery.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

lAUHCHlNU A CANOE. THE VOYAGE TO NEW ZEALAND. When the canoes were built and ready for sea.they were dragged afloat, the separate lading ofeach canoe was collected and put on board, withall the crews. Tama-te-kapua then rememberedthat he had no skilful priest on board his canoe,and he thought the best thing he could do wasto outwit Ngatoro-i-rangi, the chief who hadcommand of the Tainui. So just as his canoeshoved off, he called out to Ngatoro, I say,Ngatoro, just come on board my canoe, and per-form the necessary religious rites for me. Thenthe priest Ngatoro came on board, and Tama-te-kapua said to him, You had better also call yourwife, Kearoa on board, that she may make thecanoe clean or common, with an offering of sea-weed to be laid in the canoe instead of an offeringof fish, for you know the second fish caught in acanoe, or seaweed, or some substitute, ought to be THE VOYAGE TO NEW ZEALAND. 137 offered for the females, the first for the males ;then my canoe will be quite common

  

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Taken circa 1855