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Image from page 80 of "Turkeys, all varieties. Their care and management. Mating, rearing, exhibiting and judging turkeys; explanation of score-card judging, with complete instructions" (1909) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 80 of "Turkeys, all varieties. Their care and management. Mating, rearing, exhibiting and judging turkeys; explanation of score-card judging, with complete instructions" (1909)

Identifier: turkeysallvariet00reli

Title: Turkeys, all varieties. Their care and management. Mating, rearing, exhibiting and judging turkeys; explanation of score-card judging, with complete instructions

Year: 1909 (1900s)

Authors: Reliable Poultry Journal Publishing Company

Subjects: Turkeys

Publisher: Quincy, Ill., Reliable Poultry Journal Publishing Company Buffalo, N.Y., American Poultry Publishing Company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

fields for a great share of their living, thereby gaininga healthy, robust constitution and at the same time rid-ding the fields and meadows of grass and weed seeds,g-rasshoppers and other insects that are harmful to grow-ing crops. This certainly is converting evil into good.They will do this in the fall of the year when the corn isripe and never disturb the ears of corn. Mine do, butI always feed my turkeys at home some. Put the turkey coops near the alfalfa field if yoiican and all the day they will roam through the alfalfahunting bugs. It is interesting to watch them and hearthem chatter away while at work. Tlie turkeys that are not fit for breeders are dry-picked with the head and feet off and sent to market.Out here I received twenty cents a pound and furnishedthe hotels with them. I sell as high as one hxindred andfifty pounds to a hotel at a time, so it is easy to get ridof all the surplus. I think that the farmer who does notlai^p a flock of turkejS is making a great mistake.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Seven Hardy and ViilorouB Wild Cockerels WILD TURKEYS The Hardy Nature of the Turkey has Suffered from InBreeding and Too Intimate Association with Domestic Fowls—Relief Found in Return to More Normal Conditions and the Infusion of Wild Blood ROBERT LEE BLANTON

  

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Taken circa 1909