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Image from page 45 of "The Adolfo Stahl lectures in astronomy, delivered in San Francisco, California, in 1916-17 and 1917-18, under the auspices of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific" (1919) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 45 of "The Adolfo Stahl lectures in astronomy, delivered in San Francisco, California, in 1916-17 and 1917-18, under the auspices of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific" (1919)

Identifier: adolfostahllectu00astruoft

Title: The Adolfo Stahl lectures in astronomy, delivered in San Francisco, California, in 1916-17 and 1917-18, under the auspices of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific

Year: 1919 (1910s)

Authors: Astronomical Society of the Pacific Aitken, Robert Grant, 1864-1951

Subjects: Astronomy

Publisher: San Francisco Stanford University Press

Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

 

 

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ssures, due to theoverlying strata, may liquefy or even solidify their centralvolumes. It is thought that the gaseous strata in each of thefour planets extend to great depths and that there is nothing inthe nature of a solid or permanent crust over the surface of anyof them. Their low densities probably mean that theirenormously deep atmospheres are still quite hot. Yet we haveno evidence that any one of them is shining by its own light.When one of Jupiters large satellites passes between the Sunand the planet, eclipsing a small area of the planets surface,that area looks black, but this may be in part a contrast effect. We should call attention to the flattened forms of Jupiter andSaturn. The rotation of the Earth once in about twenty-fourhours has caused the equatorial regions to be thrown out bycentrifugal force, in effect, and the polar regions to be cor-respondingly drawn in, until the difference between the equa-torial and polar diameters is twenty-six miles. The great

 

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Fig. 1 —Photographs of Saturn, Nov. 19, 1911, 60-inch reflector (100-footfocus) of the Solar Observatory. Direct enlargement exposures byE. E. Barnard.

 

 

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