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Image from page 219 of "Elements of astronomy: accompanied with numerous illustrations, a colored representation of the solar, stellar, and nebular spectra, and celestial charts of the northern and the southern hemisphere" (1875) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 219 of "Elements of astronomy: accompanied with numerous illustrations, a colored representation of the solar, stellar, and nebular spectra, and celestial charts of the northern and the southern hemisphere" (1875)

Identifier: elementsofastron00lock

Title: Elements of astronomy: accompanied with numerous illustrations, a colored representation of the solar, stellar, and nebular spectra, and celestial charts of the northern and the southern hemisphere

Year: 1875 (1870s)

Authors: Lockyer, Norman, Sir, 1836-1920

Subjects: Astronomy

Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

r that the variation depends more upon the eccen-tricity of the orbits of the other planets than upon ourown. hibited. 379. By what is the apparent, path of a planet affected? What doesFie. 82 represent ? What is seen with respect to the nearness of the planets atdifferent oppositions ? 380. What may also be understood from Fig. 82? What 212 APPEARANCES OF SATUENS EINGS. 381. Fig. 82 also shows us that, when Mars is observedat the solstice indicated, we see the southern hemisphereof the planet better than the northern one ; while at thoseoppositions which occur when the planet is at the oppositesolstice, the northern hemisphere is chiefly visible. Butwe see more of the northern hemisphere in the latter casethan we do of the southern one in the former, because inthe latter case the planet is above the ecliptic, and wetherefore see under it better; in the former it is below theecliptic, and we see less of the southern hemisphere thanwe should do were the planet situated in the ecliptic.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fig. 83.—Different Appearances of Saturns Eings. 382. Saturns Rings as seen at Different Times fromthe Earth.—Fig. 83 shows the effect of inclination inthe case of the rings of Saturn. The plane of the rings isinclined to the ecliptic, and the different positions of this opposition will be the most favorable for observation ? 381. When is the southernhemisphere of Mars best seen, and when the northern ? Why at the latter timedo we see the northern hemisphere more fully than we see the southern hemi-sphere at the former ? 382. What is shown in Fig. 83 ? What different appear- THE EINGS SOMETIMES INVISIBLE. 213

 

 

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