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Image from page 524 of "A history of advertising from the earliest times : illustrated by anecdotes, curious specimens and biographical notes" (1874) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 524 of "A history of advertising from the earliest times : illustrated by anecdotes, curious specimens and biographical notes" (1874)

Identifier: historyofadverti00samp

Title: A history of advertising from the earliest times : illustrated by anecdotes, curious specimens and biographical notes

Year: 1874 (1870s)

Authors: Sampson, Henry, 1841-1891

Subjects: Advertising

Publisher: London : Chatto and Windus

Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

ubhc revenue to the extent of^^250,000 annually will, however, be the consequence ofthe annihilation of lotteries, and it must remain for thosewho have strenuously supported the putting a stop to lot-teries to provide for the deficiency.— Although that whichended yesterday was the last, if we are informed correctlythe lottery-office keepers have been left with a great numberof tickets remaining on their hands—a pretty strong proofthat the public in general have now no relish for theseschemes.— The concourse of persons in Basinghall Streetwas very great; indeed, the street was almost impassable,and everybody seemed desirous of ascertaining the fortunatenumbers. In the gallery the greatest interest was excited,as the various prizes were drawn from the wheel j and assoon as a numbered ticket was drawn from the numberwheel, every one looked with anxiety to his share, in orderto ascertain if Fortune smiled on him. Only one instanceoccurred where a prize was drawn and a number held by

 

Text Appearing After Image:

THE LAST OF THE LOTTERIES. Z0 TTERIES AND L OTTER Y INSURANCES. 471 any individual present. The fortunate person was a littleman, who no sooner had learned that his number was agrand prize, than he buttoned up his coat, and coolly walkedoff without uttering a word. As the drawing proceededdisappointment began to succeed the hopes indulged bythose who were present. On their entrance to the hallevery face wore a cheerful appearance j but on the termina-tion of the drawing a strong contrast was exhibited, andthe features of each were strongly marked with dissatisfac-tion. The drawing commenced shortly after five oclock,and ended at twenty minutes past six. The doors of thevarious lottery offices were also surrounded by personsawaiting the issue of the drawing. The TimeSy in a short leader—short and few were theleaders in the Times of that day—published on the Thursday,says : * Yesterday terminated the lotteries in this country—may we say. for ever ? We know not. Such a result willd

 

 

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