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Image from page 147 of "History of the Twenty-fourth Michigan of the Iron brigade, known as the Detroit and Wayne county regiment .." (1891) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 147 of "History of the Twenty-fourth Michigan of the Iron brigade, known as the Detroit and Wayne county regiment .." (1891)

Identifier: historyoftwentyf00curti

Title: History of the Twenty-fourth Michigan of the Iron brigade, known as the Detroit and Wayne county regiment ..

Year: 1891 (1890s)

Authors: Curtis, O. B. (Orson Blair), 1841?-1901

Subjects: Michigan Infantry. 24th regiment, 1862-1865 United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories Iron Brigade

Publisher: Detroit, Mich., Winn & Hammond

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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ificiently marvelous for historical record of the greatman; but when several members of the Twenty-fourth Michiganeasily performed the same feat, they believed that the youthfulGeorges ability to tell the truth and perform this stone throwing actwas not at all remarkable. (137) 138 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-FOURTH MICHIGAN. CHUCK-OR-LUCK — FRIENDLY PICKETS, ETC. On Sunday, May 10, the Chaplains of the Iron Brigade wereendeavoring to re-estabhsh religious services, but they met with acounter-attraction, as the following facetious request of ColonelRobinson of the Seventh Wisconsin to the Assistant Adjutant of theIron Brigade will show: Sir—There is a large crowd of soldiers in the grove below, engaged in theinteresting game called Chuck-or-Luck. My chaplain is running his church on theother side of me, but Chuck-.or-Luck has the largest crowd. I think this unfair, asthe church runs only once a week, but the game goes on daily, I suggest that one orthe other of the parties be dispersed.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

SOLDIKRS PLAYING CHUCK-OR-LUCK. This game which had such a fascination among the soldiers, wasa diminutive system of gambling, the elements of which too often arefound in methods adopted by churches and Sunday schools for raisingmoney by raffles and chance. This game was played with dice orsmall blocks in imitation. Sometimes it was played on a board ;often on a rubber blanket or the hard ground. Six sections werespaced off, each numbered in order. Two soldiers would play thegame, one representing the banker and the other the venturer.The latter would choose one or two of the numbers and place FROM CHANCELI.ORSVILLE TO GHTTYSHURG. 139 a piece of money on each, which were covered by the banker withan equal amount. If the dice thrown gave the number or numberschosen, then the player won and the banker lost. If the dicefailed to turn up the numbers chosen, then the banker took all themoney. The chances were about five to one in favor of the latter.Soon after pay-day this game had a great

  

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Taken circa 1891