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Image from page 342 of "The naturalist's library; containing scientific and popular descriptions of man, quadrupeds, birds, fishes, reptiles and insects;" (1850) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 342 of "The naturalist's library; containing scientific and popular descriptions of man, quadrupeds, birds, fishes, reptiles and insects;" (1850)

Identifier: naturalistslibra00goul

Title: The naturalist's library; containing scientific and popular descriptions of man, quadrupeds, birds, fishes, reptiles and insects;

Year: 1850 (1850s)

Authors: Gould, Augustus A. (Augustus Addison), 1805-1866

Subjects: Natural history

Publisher: Boston, Phillips, Sampson, and company

Contributing Library: MBLWHOI Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MBLWHOI Library

 

 

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e leather,excellently adapted for moccasins, or other articles of winter clothing. Itsmovements are very heavy ; it shuffles or ambles along, its joints crackingat every step, with a sound heard to some distance. During its progress,it holds up its nose so as to lay the horns back horizontally. Although itsfigure is uncouth, yet when seen in a wilderness, in all the glory of its fullgrown horns, no animal could appear more majestic or imposing. THE STAG* Is one of those mild, tranquil, innocent animals, which seem as if they werecreated solely to adorn and animate the solitude of the forests, and to occupy 1 Ccrvu* clapkus, Lin. MAMMALIA—STAG. 335 remote from man, the peaceful retreats of nature. His light and elegantform ; his flexible, yet nervous limbs; his head rather adorned, than armed,with a living substance, like the branch of a tree, which is every yearrenewed; his size, his swiftness, his strength, sufficiently distinguish himfrom the rest of the inhabitants of the forest.

 

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The old stags shed their horns first, which happens about the end of Feb-ruary, or the beginning of March. Stags in their seventh year do notundergo this change till the middle or the end of March; nor do those intheir sixth year, till the month of April. After they have shed their horns, they separate from each other; the veryyoung ones, alone, associating together. They remain no longer in covert;they seek the beautiful parts of the country, the groves, and the open cop-pices, where they remain all the summer, till they recover the antlers whichwere wont to adorn their brows. And, during this season, they carry theirheads low, for fear of striking them against the branches; for they areexceedingly tender till they arrive at perfection. The horns of the oldeststags are scarcely half repaired by the month of May; nor do they attaintheir full length and hardness till about the end of July. The horns of theyoung stag are very late shed, and very late recovered; but when theseare complet

 

 

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Taken circa 1850