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Image from page 355 of "Moving pictures : how they are made and worked" (1914) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 355 of "Moving pictures : how they are made and worked" (1914)

Identifier: movingpicturesho00talb

Title: Moving pictures : how they are made and worked

Year: 1914 (1910s)

Authors: Talbot, Frederick Arthur Ambrose, 1880-

Subjects: Motion pictures

Publisher: Philadelphia : J. B. Lippincott Co.

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

c _. v. a C

 

Text Appearing After Image:

[Copyright, C. ArtiisirbAg.THE LATES1 CRAZE l\ TRICK CINEMATOGRAPHY.Silho lettes with models. xxiii TRICK PICTURES 259 just as great hilarity in the United States as attended itsexhibition in this country. During the past two years the silhouette trick film hascome to the front owing to the novelty of the fundamentaltheme and the successful combination of humour withmystery. We all know the old shadowgraph play, whereinthe actors carry through their parts behind a white sheetbefore a powerful light, which casts their shadows uponthe screen. The idea is now applied to cinematography.One or two films of this character made their appearancesome time ago from foreign sources, but it has been leftto an English experimenter, Mr. C. Armstrong, to reducethis ingenious trick subject to an exact science. In an American attempt in this direction, living actorswere used, but the outcome was scarcely happy, inasmuchas the trick effects were very limited, being confined mostlyto weird contrasts in

  

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Taken circa 1914