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Image from page 54 of "The museum of natural history, with introductory essay on the natural history of the primeval world : being a popular account of the structure, habits, and classification of the various departments of the animal kingdom, quadrupeds, | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 54 of "The museum of natural history, with introductory essay on the natural history of the primeval world : being a popular account of the structure, habits, and classification of the various departments of the animal kingdom, quadrupeds,

Identifier: museumofnaturalh21869rich

Title: The museum of natural history, with introductory essay on the natural history of the primeval world : being a popular account of the structure, habits, and classification of the various departments of the animal kingdom, quadrupeds, birds, reptiles, fishes, shells, and insects, including the insects destructive to agriculture

Year: 1869 (1860s)

Authors: Richardson, John, Sir, 1787-1865 Dallas, W. S. (William Sweetland), 1824-1890 Cobbold, T. Spencer (Thomas Spencer), 1828-1886 Baird, William, 1803-1872 White, Adam, 1817-1879 Kellogg, Remington, 1892-1969, former owner. DSI Library of Congress, former owner. DSI

Subjects: Zoology

Publisher: London Glasgow Edinburgh : William MacKenzie

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

 

 

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n, and that bothwere destroyed by the Great Being with his annihilatingthunders. The native Indians of Virginia had a some-what similar legend. As these huge elephants preyedupon all the other animals created to supply the wants ofthe Indians, God the Thunderer destroyed them, onlyone succeeding in escaping the terrible bolts. This wasthe great male, which presented its head to the thun-derbolts, and shook them otf as they fell; but being atlength woiuided in the side, he fled towards the greatlakes, wdiere he remains concealed unto this day. From these simple fictions we may, at all events,infer that the Mastodon has flourished upon earth at no NATURAL HISTORY OF THE PRIMEVAL WORLD. very remote epocli. In trulli, it was contemporaneouswith the luamniotli, and tlie latter, if he did not live atthe same time as the earliest human races, precededthem hut by a very brief interval. It was Cuvier who distinguished the great quadrupedfrom the living elephant by pointing out its osteological

 

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^silN. ^ Mastujon restored. differences, and appropriately named it the Maslodnn,or teat-like toothed animal, from the Greek ij^aarog, a teat, and 63ouj, a tooth. As we have said, its habits were herbivorous. Itdoubtlessly lived on the banks of great rivers and onmoist and marshy lands. Besides the Mastodon gicjan-tnis there flourished a less formidable species, one-thirdenialler than the elephant, which ranged over nearlyall Europe. At this period (and also in the Miocene) the Apesmake their appearance. In the ossiferous beds of Sau-sun were discovered the Pitheoua antiquus, and theDryopithecns. At Pikerni, in Greece, have been foundthe entire skeleton of a Mesopilhecus, whose generalorganization resembled that of the dog-faced baboon,or mandrill. The hippopotamus, tapir, and camel of the Pleio-cene period were not distinguished by any remarkablecharacters. The horse, the ox, and the deer resembledtheir successors of the same genera in all importantfeatures; the horse, however, did n

 

 

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