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Image from page 891 of "Our greater country; being a standard history of the United States from the discovery of the American continent to the present time .." (1901) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 891 of "Our greater country; being a standard history of the United States from the discovery of the American continent to the present time .." (1901)

Identifier: ourgreatercountr00nort

Title: Our greater country; being a standard history of the United States from the discovery of the American continent to the present time ..

Year: 1901 (1900s)

Authors: Northrop, Henry Davenport, 1836-1909

Subjects:

Publisher: Philadelphia, National pub co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

 

 

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eed to thefavored lands for the purpose of working thegold mines. These expeditions being re-ported to the Government, measures weretaken by the War Department to prevent 12S ADMINISTRATION OP^ ULYSSP:S S. GRANT. any intrusion into the Indian reservation.Notwithstanding this prohibition, privateexpeditions were fitted out and started forthe Black Hills. Some of these were drivenback by the Indians, with loss of life andproperty, but others succeeded in reachingthe Black Hills. It was now evident that a systematic anddetermined effort would be made to settlethe Black Hills, in spite of the opposition of to retire to the reservation to which thetreaty of 1867 confined them, and now tookadvantage of the intrusions of the whites intotheir territory to gratify their long-cherishedwish for war. They broke away from theirreservation, and made repeated forays intoWyoming and Montana, laid the countr)waste, carried off the horses and cattle, andmurdered such settlers as ventured to opposethem.

 

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SHOSHONEE FALLS, IDAHO. the army; and the government decided to,endeavor to purchase the region from the ]Sioux and throw it open to emigrationEfforts were made during the year 1875 toinduce the Sioux to sell their lands, but theweak and vacillating course pursued by thegovernment simply disgusted the Indians,and they refused to make the desired ar-rangement. The Sioux had never been really willing This brought mitters to a crisis, and earlyin 1876 the government resolved to drivethe Sioux back upon their reservation. Aforce of regular troops, under Generals Terryand Crook, was sent into the difficult moun-tainous region of the Upper Vellowstonc,and an active campaign was begun againstthe Indians. The foice was too small, how-ever, for the work required of it. In spite of the smallness of its numbers, ADMINISTRATION OF ULYSSES S. GRANT. 829 the army on the frontier succeeded in forc-\ng the savages, who were led Dy SittingBull, their most famous chief, and who num-bered several thousa

 

 

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Taken circa 1901