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Image from page 673 of "The world's inhabitants; or, Mankind, animals, and plants; being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands" (1888) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 673 of "The world's inhabitants; or, Mankind, animals, and plants; being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands" (1888)

Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett

Title: The world's inhabitants; or, Mankind, animals, and plants; being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands

Year: 1888 (1880s)

Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891

Subjects: Civilization Culture

Publisher: London Ward, Lock

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

WOMAN OF ZAMBESI. 66o THE INHABITANTS OF AFRICA. On the Rovuma river it is worn even by the men. As is so usual amongAfrican tribes, they are great believers in the poison ordeal. The shores of Lake Nyassa are thickly peopled, all the people beingtattooed from head to foot with figures which specially mark the tribe.The Matumboka, who live to the west of the lake, produce little wart-like elevations on the face, giving a very repulsive appearance to the women. It is scarcely as yet possible to take a general view of the people ofthis vast region, except to say that they are for the most part more alliedin race, and far more in language, to the Kaffirs, than to the Soudanese

 

Text Appearing After Image:

HEAD MEN IN THE ROVUMA DISTRICT, EAST AFRICA. THE MAN ON THE RIGHT IS A MAVIA.(Fr<)?ii a Phofograpli lent h)^ D\\ Beddoe, F.E.S.) Negroes. We must content ourselves for the most part with followingThe fli6 descriptions of the more notable explorers. CameronUnyamuesL (Across Africa) thus describes the natives of Unyamuesi,north-east of Ugogo. Their distinguishing tribal marks are a tattooedline down the centre of the forehead and on each temple ; the two tipperfront teeth are chipped so as to show a chevron-shaped gap; and a smalltriangular piece of hippopotamus ivory or of shell, ground down white andpolished, is hung round the neck. ^ Their ornaments consist principally ofbeads and brass and iron wire. Chiefs and headmen wear enormouscylindrical bracelets of ivory, extending from wrist to elbow, which SOUTH TROPICAL AFRICANS. 66i are used also as signals in warfare. The noise • occasioned by strikingthem together is heard at a long distance, and is used by the chiefsas a call fo

 

 

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