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Image from page 468 of "The illustrated companion to the Latin dictionary and Greek lexicon; forming a glossary of all the words representing visible objects connected with the arts, manufactures, and every-day life of the Greeks and Romans, with represen

Identifier: illustratedcompa00rich

Title: The illustrated companion to the Latin dictionary and Greek lexicon; forming a glossary of all the words representing visible objects connected with the arts, manufactures, and every-day life of the Greeks and Romans, with representations of nearly two thousand objects from the antique

Year: 1849 (1840s)

Authors: Rich, Anthony, 1803 or 1804-1891

Subjects: Classical dictionaries

Publisher: London, Longmans

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

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er, like the modernsacristy, built at the back of a temple.Front, ad M. Caes. 1. 8. ed. Ang.Maio. OPISTHOGRAPHUS (&m<r06-ypacpos). Written on both sides ofthe paper, or backed, as it is techni-cally called by our compositors ; apractice not habitual to the ancients,but adopted sometimes for economy,especially in the case of foul copieswhich were intended to be writtenout fair afterwards. Plin. Ep. iii.5. 17. OPOROTHECA or OPORO-THECE (oTrwpoerjKrj). A store forpreserving autumnal fruits, such aspears, apples, grapes, &c. Varro,B. R. i. 2. 10. Id. i. 59. 2. OPPESSULATUS. (Apul. Met.i. p. 16. ix. p. ^98. Ammian. xxxi.13. 15.) Fastened with a Pessulus ;which see. OFPIDUM. Generally, a town;thence, in a special sense, the mass ofbuildings occupying the straight endof a circus (Nsevius ap. Varro, L. L.v. 133. Festus, s. v.), which includedthe stalls for the horses and chariots(carceres), the row of seats above,where the musicians and spectatorssat, the gate between them, through

 

Text Appearing After Image:

which the Circensian procession en- I trance, because there were generally tered the course (porta pom-pa), and j fourteen, though this particular cir- the towers which flanked the whole j cus, which was a very small one, on either side, all which together j only had twelve. Its general situa- presented the appearance of a town, | tion as regards the rest of the edifice as shown by the annexed example, ; is shown by the ground-plan, p. 165. representing the oppidum in the cir- j A A and b., and a portion in elevation, cus of Caracalla near Rome, restored j belonging to the hippodrome once from the existing remains, which are ; existing at Constantinople, at p. 166. very considerable. One stall has j OPTIONES. Deputies or adju- been added on each side of the en- I tants in the army, whom the superior 454 OPTOSTROTUM. ORBIS. officers and centurions had the powerof appointing to assist them in thedischarge of their duties, or to per-form their duty for them in case theywere themselves in

  

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Taken circa 1849